Galway In Days Gone By

Staff at work in December 1970 in the Micro-Motors Groschopp (Ireland) Ltd. factory, then celebrating its first year on the Galway Industrial Estate. A total of 38 were then employed in the manufacture of fractional horsepower motors for printing machines, textile and laboratory equipment, with plans to treble this number within the following five years.
Staff at work in December 1970 in the Micro-Motors Groschopp (Ireland) Ltd. factory, then celebrating its first year on the Galway Industrial Estate. A total of 38 were then employed in the manufacture of fractional horsepower motors for printing machines, textile and laboratory equipment, with plans to treble this number within the following five years.

1919

Transport facilities

If agricultural production is to be developed in Ireland to its fullest extent, transport facilities in rural districts must be considerably improved and cheapened.

The statement holds good as regards production from industries other than agriculture, but since agriculture dominates the national economy of this country the remarks that follow are confined to consideration to the question from that viewpoint.

Apart from the question of increased production there are other considerations which render necessary to the provision of adequate means of transport – with, as a consequence, wider range of marketing.

There are, for instance, the increasing costs of labour, and of practically every item included in the terms “cost of production” and “cost of marketing”.

Home rule resistance

Frankly we sympathise with the attitude taken up by Mr. Eamonn de Valera in his cable message to Mr. Arthur Griffith.

He warns the Irish people against being misled by the old dodge of the boy riding on the donkey holding the eternal carrot before the stupid animal’s nose.

We cannot forget that Sir Horace Plunkett worked for eighteen months at the Irish Convention while the Irish people remained patient and expectant and towards the end of all these arduous labours, Mr. Lloyd George incontinently set up a narrow ne plus ultra that destroyed, as it was obviously intended to destroy, the work of that assembly and threw the Irish people back into the wilderness.

The blight

Further appearances of blight are reported from four districts in Co. Kerry, from the Clifden, Letterfrack and Shrule districts of Co. Galway, from Miltown-Malbay, Co. Clare, and from Clare Island, Co. Mayo.

Only small patches of crops are affected and spraying is stated to be fairly general now in the areas. The further appearance of the disease should, however, serve as a reminder to growers who have not yet commenced spraying operations that the work should be taken in hand immediately when growth is sufficiently forward, that is, when the stalks are from 12 to 15 inches high.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City  and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.