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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Staff at work in December 1970 in the Micro-Motors Groschopp (Ireland) Ltd. factory, then celebrating its first year on the Galway Industrial Estate. A total of 38 were then employed in the manufacture of fractional horsepower motors for printing machines, textile and laboratory equipment, with plans to treble this number within the following five years.

1919

Transport facilities

If agricultural production is to be developed in Ireland to its fullest extent, transport facilities in rural districts must be considerably improved and cheapened.

The statement holds good as regards production from industries other than agriculture, but since agriculture dominates the national economy of this country the remarks that follow are confined to consideration to the question from that viewpoint.

Apart from the question of increased production there are other considerations which render necessary to the provision of adequate means of transport – with, as a consequence, wider range of marketing.

There are, for instance, the increasing costs of labour, and of practically every item included in the terms “cost of production” and “cost of marketing”.

Home rule resistance

Frankly we sympathise with the attitude taken up by Mr. Eamonn de Valera in his cable message to Mr. Arthur Griffith.

He warns the Irish people against being misled by the old dodge of the boy riding on the donkey holding the eternal carrot before the stupid animal’s nose.

We cannot forget that Sir Horace Plunkett worked for eighteen months at the Irish Convention while the Irish people remained patient and expectant and towards the end of all these arduous labours, Mr. Lloyd George incontinently set up a narrow ne plus ultra that destroyed, as it was obviously intended to destroy, the work of that assembly and threw the Irish people back into the wilderness.

The blight

Further appearances of blight are reported from four districts in Co. Kerry, from the Clifden, Letterfrack and Shrule districts of Co. Galway, from Miltown-Malbay, Co. Clare, and from Clare Island, Co. Mayo.

Only small patches of crops are affected and spraying is stated to be fairly general now in the areas. The further appearance of the disease should, however, serve as a reminder to growers who have not yet commenced spraying operations that the work should be taken in hand immediately when growth is sufficiently forward, that is, when the stalks are from 12 to 15 inches high.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Molly Browne singing 'Here's a toast to you Claddagh at the foot of Fairhill' at the opening of Claddagh Festival on August 1, 1976.

1921

Tackling food prices
We trust that there will be a good attendance and a united effort to get an efficient committee at the Anti-Profiteering Committee’s preliminary meeting at the Town Hall at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesday. A real effort should be made to secure that people of independent standing, whose courage in the public interest can be relied on, are put on the committee.
What is wanted more than anything else is a little grit, and our criticisms, we are glad to note, have already gone far to encourage this. We welcome Dr. Walsh’s reference, even though belated, to the price charged for essential foodstuffs, such as bread and milk, in Galway.
But what of gas at 10s. 10d.? Wicklow has decided that 7s. 6d. is an ample price to pay, and Wicklow has refused to accept anything but Irish arbitration on the price.
In consequence, Wicklow town has buckled its armour and reversed the usual order of things by cutting off the gas company and is resorting to other means of lighting and heating. And it has been found that wonders can now be achieved on paraffin oil!
Mr. Fallon, of Abbeygate-street, advises in our columns today meat at from 9d. to 1s. per lb., and in consequence Mr. Fallon can rely upon crowds of customers, whilst those of his colleagues, who refuse to face facts, can stand with folded arms and unclaimed carcases.
Messrs. Commins and Greany are selling an ordinary twig at 1s. 6d., which it cost 5s. 6d. to purchase a few months ago. Above all, the new profiteering committee should watch the public market, ensuring that local people should have the food in preference to the exporter.

1946

Light agenda
The Oughterard Development Association has invited the three West Galway T.D.s to a conference on Sunday next to discuss ways and means of redressing local grievances. The main items on the agenda are the question of providing a modern sewerage system and the proposed extension of E.S.B. current to the town.
It is understood that the plans for the sewerage system are now in their final stage and only awaiting the sanction of the Department. The T.D.s will be asked to see that sanction be forthcoming as speedily as possible.
The people argue that if unlimited financial resources can be made available to open up new tourist centres in out-of-the-way places, some consideration should be given to the claims of long-established centres like Oughterard.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Islanders after they greeted the Archbishop of Tuam, Dr Joseph Cunnane, who had travelled to Aran to perform the island's first Confirmations in four years at St Brigid's Church, Kilronan, on June 25, 1970.

1911

Opening old wounds

“The incoherent explanation of the Irish Office will convince many that what was most feared in Ireland is true – namely, that the British Government, while negotiations for ‘peace’ are in progress, while a truce is in operation, have set about organising the most horrible of all kinds of war in Ireland – the fanatical religious wars of the seventeenth century.”

Ireland has very good reason to be suspicious of English politicians who come to her bearing gifts. We need scarcely wonder that the revelations so opportunely made during the week of an attempt to raise a secret Orange army have created a spirit of uneasiness throughout the country.

If there is to be Irish Peace, all parties to that peace must work steadily towards it. There must be sincerity and plain dealing and these presuppose good-will, the sedulous avoidance of causes of friction, and the preparation for a period when uncertainties and tragedies of to-day will have passed into an evil memory.

So far as Ireland outside the six counties in concerned, the manner in which the Truce has been observed has won the admiration even of those of our political enemies who are not altogether blinded by prejudice. Nothing has been done either by word or action that would embarrass the men who are charged with the high task of bringing to Ireland the greatest of all gifts – namely, a lasting peace – and of bringing to England that which her politicians declare they most ardently desire – namely, an end to the century-old conflict that has embarrassed them in every corner of the globe where friendly international relations are of vital importance to their wellbeing.

Whilst the majority of people in Ireland have left no doubt as to their earnest desire for an honourable settlement, the scenes that have taken place in the home of the Partition Parliament since Friday last are such as to shock humanity.

Whilst it was learned last evening that the Curlew restrictions and the steps taken by the authorities had restored tranquillity for a time, it was also learned that two further victims had succumbed to the uncontrolled mob.

The death of these two who had been wounded in the previous day’s rioting brings the number of victims during the week in Belfast up to the alarming total of twenty, whilst over seventy have been wounded, and many more have been rendered homeless.

In the midst of these horrors, it is openly charged against the British Government, which is negotiating with Ireland for peace, that it is at the same time secretly conniving at the establishment of an “Ulster” Army, which, as the Parliament of the North-East has no funds, the Government will obviously finance.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A child on horseback in Ballinasloe as part of the Festival Week on October 1, 1977.

1921

Indifferent girls

If our girls have any sense of local or personal pride, they will take prompt measures to remove the grave reproaches cast upon them at the meeting of Ballinasloe Asylum Committee on Monday.

It was charged that those who entered the institution to fit themselves for one of the most responsible posts in the nursing profession were “careless” in their studies, and “absolutely indifferent to their duties”.

A well-known Roscommon clergyman, whose knowledge of the classes from which these girls are drawn is considerable, went further and declared that they are “careless, idle and lazy”.

We had this week remarkable confirmation of the suggestion that girls who aspire to business and secretarial are indifferent to study. A shorthand-typist, so-called, was dismissed from a business establishment for incompetence – then she applied to a local school to study business methods.

It had apparently never occurred to her to improve her efficiency so long as she could “hang” on to her position. It is, indeed, a remarkable fact that Galway, with all its schools, seems unable to turn out a well-trained, well-educated, efficient business girl.

Those who are being sent out to the world are largely without skill, without ambition, and they altogether lack that thoroughness that tell so much in the office girl.

State of the roads

The state of the roads in this district has become a menace to human life. There are deep potholes all over, and the slush in most towns is ankle deep.

Nobody seems to be doing anything at all to roads. Yet money is being paid out every quarter for “maintenance”. Travellers must be careful if they wish to avoid accidents. And whilst the roads are allowed to run down officials are kept comfortable in jobs.

Surely, whilst general repairs on a large scale need not be undertaken, something should be done to clean the streets, and prevent our roads going altogether to pieces. The worse they get, the greater the costs on ourselves later.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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