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Galway Fertility Clinic – Egg Vitrification

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Egg vitrification or freezing of eggs for later use is available at Galway Fertility Clinic

Egg vitrification or freezing is now available at Galway Fertility Clinic.

This can be considered as insurance against aging as it involves freezing eggs when young so they are available when older.

In many cases they will never be needed as the woman will not have fertility issues and will conceive naturally.

‘In women under 35 where 20 mature eggs are frozen we would anticipate an 80% chance of a baby’, says Dr Lowe.

‘We have women asking for egg freezing who are over 38 and the chance of a baby for someone with 20 eggs remaining could be less than 30%.

‘There is no guarantee of a successful pregnancy and the reasons for delaying pregnancy should be explored”

For more information contact the Galway Fertility Clinic here.

See also:

Galway Fertility Clinic sees 20% rise in pregnancy rates

What is an embryoscope?

Country Living

There’s far more to a name than one might think at first

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

It’s funny at times how a small thing can set a thought process in place. Hopefully, not being too narcissistic from a newspaper point of view, as I was looking at the front-page picture on the front page of last week’s Connacht Tribune, a really delightful shot (by Seán Lydon) of a young girl from Portumna picture alongside Joe Healy and her pet lamb at Corrandulla Show, the link between names and activities/occupations struck me.

It was the prettiest of pictures of seven-year-old Isabella Dagg but straight away the link between the name and the sheep rang a bell in my brain, and took me back to one of those farm activities that as a child, I certainly had no great fondness for – yes, you’ve guessed it, dagging sheep.

This piece of ovine grooming certainly held no romance for a 12-year-old, although in fairness, my contribution to the process was mostly in the containment of the lamb or hogget that was coming under the ‘barber’s touch’ from my father’s dagging shears. The ‘dagging’ word had nearly evaporated from my brain cells until I glanced at that beautiful picture.

On a broader scale there is a very academic term to describe people of a particular name who end up in a profession that matches their moniker. We’ve all come across them here and there – the John Barber who cuts hair or the Seán Ashe who doctors trees.

Now, admittedly this has to slip into the world of grand trivia, but what else would man be doing on a showery Thursday?

Anyway from my little research probes, the scientific or academic title for this name link to occupations is ‘nominative determinism’. (Try saying that some night when you have a couple of pints extra in the tank!).

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Door to a new world

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Michael Hegarty with his book Gateways to Psychotherapy.

Lifestyle – Michael Hegarty had a successful career in banking and finance until his world fell apart in 2008 when his marriage of 36 years ended. At a crossroads, he tentatively moved in a new direction and has since gone on to train and practise as a psychotherapist.  His own therapy sessions helped heal deeply buried childhood traumas and changed his life. He has now written a book on talk therapy to help others appreciate its benefits, as he tells BERNIE NÍ FHLATHARTA.

Never was the saying ‘when one door closes, another one opens’ as true as it was for one man who found himself on a journey of self-discovery, which led to a whole new career.

That’s exactly how Michael Hegarty became a psychotherapist, an occupation he had never anticipated.

Not only has the former banker and financial consultant been working as a psychotherapist for the past 10 years but he has just written a book explaining what’s involved.

To put it simply, it’s a practical and structured approach to talk therapy – as it says on the cover. And already, Gateways to Psychotherapy has been well received among his peers and readers at home and abroad.

Michael is brutally honest in the book’s introduction about how he stumbled into therapy. He floundered when his marriage of 36 years broke up in 2008 and says he was lost in body and soul, despite his work, swimming sessions in the gym, hill walking and fishing on the Corrib.

He didn’t think twice when his son, David, suggested he enrol in a philosophy course. This was the start of a new journey for him, one that would take him into the inner workings of his mind.

It was an emotional journey that brought hidden, repressed childhood trauma to the fore, memories of child abuse, (being sexually abused more than 400 times over two-and-a-half years, from age 12, until he put up his fists to the man responsible, who turned and walked away, looking for his next victim) abandonment (his mother disappeared for six months when he was just six. She was actually in Holles Street Hospital in Dublin) and the day-to-day struggle of being one of 12 children.

The family moved many times to accommodate his father’s banking job which resulted in Michael changing primary schools five times. He was born in Nenagh but lived in Westport, County Mayo; Tullow, County Carlow; Enniscorthy, County Wexford; and Kenmare, County Kerry, before he himself joined the bank straight from Leaving Cert at 17.

He subsequently lived and worked in Castletownbere, West Cork; Doon, County Limerick; Dunlavin, County Wicklow; Dunmanway, West Cork; and Cork City before arriving in Galway in 1981.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Photographed in November 1976 at a precurser to Galway Arts Festival. From left: Kevin Cheeser, Bernie Lynch RIP, Jimmy O’Malley, Mary Coughlan and Ollie Jennings. They were all in the UCG Arts Society and were at a reception in Áras Fáilte on the corner of Merchants Road and Victoria Place to announce a weekend of Arts events including back-to-back concerts in the Jesuit Hall, Sea Road with Loudon Wainwright 111 and The Bothy Band. It was £1 admission to Loudon and all 500 tickets sold out.These students went on to start the first Galway Arts Festival in April 1978. The festival, which kicks off on Monday next, is now in its 45th year.

1922

A nations agony

The news which it is our melancholy privilege to convey to our readers this week is sad reading. Irishmen who but yesterday lived in brotherly comradeship are in death grips.

It is not a fight with a foreign enemy, but a fratricidal strife. And it must leave its inevitable trail of bitterness, which may sour the opening years of a land restored to nationhood after seven and a half centuries. Hence, it would have been better if the struggle could have been avoided, if the constitutional way of settling our own differences had been chosen.

The people have stated their wish and will. Surely in a civilised country it should be the supreme law?

The politicians, too, seemed to have reached mutual understanding, whereby the advantages already gained would be secured to the country, and it was common property that the army was on the point of arriving at a working arrangement.

In Galway City, the two sections had, some earlier incidents notwithstanding, worked admirably together. It is of a piece with the national tragedy today that men who but a week ago were doing police work in the City, and doing it admirably, should now be ranged against brothers in the recent struggle.

But those who grumble against the destruction of national property should take consolation from the outstanding fact that at a time of acute tension and trial, every precaution was taken locally to ensure that no Irish blood was spilt, no person endangered, and looking out upon the wreck of Dublin, they should thank God and hold their peace.

None the less, there is the poignantly tragic feeling that those for whom – blood being thicker than water – we had gained a sincere affection since they came amongst us no longer as hunted men should not be working together for the common weal instead of strangling the economic and national life of a country that for years to come will need the services and the strenuous work of every single son.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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