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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway in days gone by

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Galway Fashion Fair 1982

1914

Violent assault

Mr. Flynn, manager for Mr. James Lee, grocery and spirit stores, Dominick-street, Galway, was arrested on Saturday night, charged with having committed a violent assault on a man of the labouring class, known as Patsy Owens.

It appears that Owens and several other men were drinking in Lee’s bar and loud talk ensued. Mr. Flynn several times expostulated with Flynn for his conduct in annoying other customers, and eventually jumped over the counter and put Owens out on the street.

When outside the door of the premises, Owens struck Mr. Flynn in the face, and the latter retaliated by striking his assailant in the face. Owens is alleged to have fallen on the edge of the flags face downwards, and sustained a bad wound to his forehead.

Medical opinion was that the man was in a serious condition.

Mr. Flynn was conveyed to the barracks, where he was kept in custody for some time. Late on Saturday night he was released on bail. Owens regained consciousness on Sunday morning, and is reported to be improving.

Exciting sequel

An exciting sequel to the fracas in Lee’s pub occurred last night when Patsy Owens escaped from the Galway Workhouse hospital. Immediately, the authorities were notified of the occurrence.

Sergt. Golding had all his men of the Dominick-street barrack detailed to make an exhaustive search of the surrounding country. It appears that Owens left the hospital some time after 11 o’clock.

There was comparative quiet in the House at the time, and evidently Owens had judged the details of his escape to a nicety. He was first seen at Nile Lodge, or a distance of 400 yards from the Workhouse.

Wearing only a nightshirt, his appearance at midnight created quite a sensation, and many ladies who were returning from the theates had serious nerve shocks.

Sergt. Golding, with half-a-dozen constables, searched the road from Galway to Barna, while others were despatched to the Rahoon district, and in fact to every habitable village within a radius of four miles of the city.

The search was continued during the night and the men, weary and tired, only returned to barracks at 8 o’clock this morning to refresh themselves.

A wire was received at Eglinton-street barrack at 2 o’clock today, stating that Owens had been traced to Oughterard, where he was taken into custody.

1939

Shark battle

A three hours’ battle between a basking shark twenty-five feet long and six men in two curraghs was watched by a crowd of people gathered along the shore at Mynish, Carna, on Tuesday evening.

The men were out fishing for Pollock when they observed the shark sleeping in a cove at Mason Island. Stealing up close to it, they managed to ‘harpoon’ it with a grappling iron attached to a long rope, the end of which they had made fast to the curraghs.

The shark immediately made a dash for the open sea, dragging the curraghs after it at a terrific speed. One of the men had a shot-gun and he fired several shots into the shark’s body.

After each shot, the shark leaped into the air and then took off in a different direction. On one occasion, it doubled back towards the curraghs and half swamped one with the wash of its tail. Only the expert handling of the curraghs by experienced oarsmen averted a disaster. By this time, the people on the shore were becoming quite nervous, and they shouted to the boatmen to let go the rope and give up so dangerous a chase. The latter, however, were loth to forego their prize, and the chase continued in a shower of spray.

Not until they had been dragged over two miles out to sea did the young men decide that discretion was the better part of valour and accordingly loosed their hold of the rope.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Angela O'Keefe, Chairwoman of Music for Galway, pictured with a £16,000 Steinway grand piano just after it was delivered to University College Galway, ahead of its assembly in the Aula Maxima. Music for Galway fundraised to buy the piano which had to be transported from London after its purchase.

1922

Tackling drink

The International Congress on Prohibition sitting in Brussels reports that the liquor problem is substantially the same everywhere. In Ireland at present alcoholism has for us a tragic interest.

At no period in Irish history has there been so great a consumption of alcoholic liquors. Prohibition, even if it were practicable, would not solve the problem. America has taught us that lesson.

Scarcely a week passes that the American hospital registers do not record the death from alcoholic poisoning on a scale unprecedented before the country went “dry”.

The drink problem will never be successfully tackled in Ireland until such time as the public cooperate with the authorities in a rigid enforcement of the licensing laws and the drunkard is regarded as a pariah in a respectable community.

In this connection the announcement made at the last Galway parish court that persons found guilty of illicit distillation will be sent to jail without the option of a fine will be welcomed.

This is a step in the right direction and should act as a deterrent to people at present engaged in a traffic which is slowly poisoning the lives, in the moral as well as the physical sense, of large numbers of our people in outlying portions of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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