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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By – Threatening the Davenports

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Pupils from Kilchreest National School, Co Galway, photographed about 1947. Back row, left to right: Maureen Lally, Maura Stewart, Mary Frances Callanan, Pauline Carty, Carmel Fahy, Maureen Smith, Phil & Eileen Haverty, Beanie Carty, Biddy Howley and Ann Glynn; Fifth row: Miko Buckley, Bridie Fallon, Nora Hanlon, Mary Fallon, Mai Burke, Maura Connaughton, Bridie Cormican, Sadie Kelly, Mikie Connaughton and Paddy Carty; Fourth row: Bridie Sheil, Una Finnerty, Claire Doyle, Freida Hanlon, Teresa Murray, Phil Carty, Polly Connaughton, Marie Haverty, Angela Kelly, Mary Sheehan, Mary McLoughlin and Teresa Cormican; Third row: Paddy Roland, Eileen Carty, Breda Murray, Mary Ryan, Margaret Coye, Mary Larkin, Bridie Haverty, Tessie Hanlon, Bridget Coye, Dermot Doyle, Flan Doyle, Paddy Carty, Peter Sheehan and Brendan Hawkins; Second row: Seán Sheehan, Eugene Kelly, Tomsy Finnerty, Seán Hawkins, Jimmy Burke, Kevin McLoughlin, Thomas Burke, John Headd, Seamus Coye, Joseph McLoughlin, Liam Smith, Tommy Hanlon and Patrick Cunningham; Front row: Joe Callanan, Paddy Ryan, John Larkin, Michael Coye, Seán Stewart, Willie Joe Carty, Michael Carty, Brendan Callanan, Donal Ryan, Frankie Stewart, Paddy Finnerty, Bernard Larkin, Tommy Kiggins and Paddy Stewart.

1914

Threatening the Davenports

At the City Petty Sessions, Sergt. McMullen summoned Pat King for having on the night of June 25 come out behind the Misses Davenports place at Rockhill at 10.40 and called the ladies filthy names and threatened to knock the wall.

The Sergeant added that there was some trouble about grazing. Mr. T.M. Kenny (of Messrs Blake and Kenny) appeared on behalf of the Misses Davenport and Mr. O’Dea defended.

Sergt. McMullen deposed that the defendant at 10.30pm made use of language calculated to lead to a breach of the peace. He had no coat or cap on at the time, and made use of filthy and insulting remarks to the ladies.

Cross-examined by Mr. O’Dea: Defendant was about 300 yards away from the house at the time. Defendant spoke English; witness was clear on that. Defendant said “They took the land from me, sergeant.”

Complaints had been made of the conduct of the defendant on previous occasions. He had also been summoned for assaulting the police. Defendant was bound to the peace for a period of twelve months, himself in £10 and two sureties of £5 each.

1939

Cinema star’s sister

“What delighted us most about Galway is the friendliness and hospitality of its citizens,” said Mrs. Marion Grant, Connecticut, sister of Katherine Hepburn, the famous film actress, when she landed from the Cunard White Star Liner, Scythia, at Galway on Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Grant, both of whom are twenty-one years of age, are making a five weeks’ honeymoon tour of the West of Ireland.

Hotelier fined

At Galway District Court before Justice Sean Mac Giollarnath, George McCambridge, Royal Hotel, Galway, was charged with a breach of the licensing laws on April 10.

Guard Roger Heneghan gave evidence of visiting the premises at 3.15am and finding the following men on the premises: Brian Mac Dubhaill, Bothair Athair Griobhta; Padraig Ó Cuinn, Gaillimh, and Padraig Cruadhlaoich, An Line Nua, Gaillimh.

Defendant said that he was manager of the Royal Hotel for the past twelve months. The night Boots was in employment there when witness took over. His instructions that the licensing laws should be kept were issued to everyone in his employment. He was most anxious that no drink should be sold after hours.

The Justice said that he was satisfied there could not be proper control over premises as long as the Boots had access to the drink. He imposed a fine of 40s with an endorsement. The men found on the premises were each fined 10s.

Ashford hotel opening

With the opening of Ashford Castle as an hotel, the storied village of Cong will probably be the Mecca of many visitors to the West this summer. Heretofore the beautiful Ashford Park was more or less a closed shop to sight-seers – as admittance was strictly by permit – and consequently one of Ireland’s most interesting historical remains was almost beyond the reach of the general public.

Docks strike settled

The strike at the Galway Docks which resulted in the Limerick Steamship Company’s vessel, Rynanna, leaving on Friday last without her cargo, and held up the same company’s vessel, Maigue, in the Docks for a few days this week, was settled at a conference between representatives of the Galway Harbour Commissioners, the Galway Employers’ Federation and the dockers’ branch of the ITGWU.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Rev Fr Raymond Watters O.P recites a decade of the rosary as the rain begins to pour down during the Blessing of Galway Bay on August 15, 1882.

1922

Dawn surrender

National troops operating from Galway and Athenry at dawn on Wednesday morning surrounded an area about four miles between Liscananaun village and Aucloggeen, on the eastern side of the Corrib, and after a smart movement captured nineteen irregulars, with their officers, twenty-two service and Mauser rifles, a number of service revolvers and automatics, and considerable quantities of ammunition for bombs.

The National troops were under command of Co-Commandant Austin Brennan, O.C., Galway area, and the various battalion and company officers, and the plan to surround these villages, which lie in a marshy waste between the Curragh Line, or Galway-Headford road, and the main road from Galway to Tuam, was evolved after information had been received that a number of irregulars were quartered there, and were commandeering sheep and foodstuffs from people in surrounding districts.

Slowly and silently, accompanied by a Lancia armoured car on which machine guns were mounted, the National troops moved out from Galway shortly before two a.m. on Wednesday. One column took the Galway to Headford road, the other taking the Tuam road.

The column operating on the Headford road swung to the right beyond the Cregg river, taking the road to Drumgriffin. By dawn they had taken up extended formation in the woods around Cregg Castle, and this formed a trap into which the irregulars were subsequently driven.

Trade unions position

Mr. Cathal O’Shannon, T.D., in his presidential address at the Trade Union Congress on Monday, declare that organised Labour was separate from and independent of any political party, and would take no dictation from any quarter outside its own ranks.

He strongly protested against militarism, from whatever quarter it came, and condemned the political censorship of thought and opinion, the ignoring of laws relating to the custody of prisoners, the existence of a semi-military police force, and the propaganda on both sides.

The present conflict or strife, he declared, was unnecessary and counselled the Irish workers to keep aloof from it.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A winner at Ballybrit in July 1964 is led back by its owner and connections.

1922

Civil War impact

Had Ireland enjoyed the blessings of peace this year, the summer and autumn of 1922 would have stood out in our annals as a period when we had entered upon the first stages of real prosperity and welcomed the Irish from overseas to the shores of a free land.

Thousands of Americans came in the earlier part of the season. They had wallets full of money, which they were willing and anxious to spend amongst the people of their own land. To their dismay and keen disappointment, they found Ireland in a state of war.

A holiday in the ordinary sense was out of the question. Many of them turned to the highlands of Scotland; others went to Oberammergau, and other parts of the Continent; some turned westward again.

The daily Press has been full of the impressions of these visitors. Some of them had gone through experiences which tinged these impressions with rankling bitterness. We can imagine what they will say when they return home!

Ireland has lost by this fratricidal strife morally as well as materially, and the tragedy is that the loss has yet to be fully accounted, and that it comes upon a nation that has just secured its freedom after a struggle of centuries and at a time when we need all the wealth and work we can secure for national reconstruction.

It is now a matter of doubt whether Galway race meeting can be held this year, as those interested are not keen on courting a failure that would lower the prestige that Ballybrit has won.

Wait goes on for light

The proposed scheme for electric lighting of the town of Athenry has been temporarily postponed owing to the present condition of the country. The proposed capital was to be £3,000, £2,100 of which was to be subscribed by seven directors, while the rest was to be got from shareholders. It is expected that the project will be re-mooted as soon as opportunity offers.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking it all in at the Galway Races in 1964.

1922

Economic war

The Irish Minister for Local Government has issued letter to each parish priest and public representative calling attention to the fact that the operators of the irregulars assume more and more distinctly the character of war upon the economic life of the Irish people. Bridges are being broken and roads obstructed all over the country.

In many places the railways have been cut and traffic interrupted. Within the last few days sections of the canals have been drained off. Mr. Cosgrove says that these acts do not prevent the progress of National troops, do not even seriously impede the transport of military supplies.

They are effective only against the civilian population, preventing the proper distribution of flour, foodstuffs, causing generally great hardship and, in some cases, actual starvation; hindering the dispatch of livestock and farm produce into the customary markets and inflicting losses on the agricultural community.

The Minister goes on to point out the unemployment stagnation, and cumulative distress that must follow such acts, and declares that the economic weapon is being used to force the people to reject the Treaty and enter upon a hopeless and unnecessary war with England.

Gaelic revival 

If Ireland be wise, and her sons do not throw her back into a whirl of chaos and anarchy and lay her once more an easy prey to conquest, the Gaelic revival is assured within the lifetime of the present generation.

Our children will soon be using their own tongue as the medium of learning the arts and sciences: though it will be disclosed to them the knowledge of other peoples and lands, and of the things that concern their own.

Our Gaelic contribution on page two this week is an inspiring study. Apart from the material aspect that 560 teachers studying at local centres have in small measure compensated for the loss of the races, the fact has emerged that Galway can become the greatest centre of Gaelic culture in Ireland.

The ceilidhthe and scoraidheachta held at various centres have been the wonder and delight of our visitors, some of whom have come from the Capital of the “Black North” to learn their mother tongue at its fountain head.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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