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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking part in the music section of St Joseph's Youth Club (Shantalla area) talent competitions in the local Community Centre in 1980 were Caroline Casserley and Annette Martyn of Corrib Park; Maria Casserley, Davis Road; Louise O'Connell, Ardilaun Road and Linda Donnellan, Corrib Park.

1914

Ireland’s soldiers

Monday’s demonstration at Athenry, Galway when the massed Volunteer Corps of the county were reviewed by Col. Moore, was one of the most remarkable ever seen in the West of Ireland, and it was unquestionably the most historic and impressive that has taken place in Connacht for the last fifty years.

The spirit of nationality which pervaded the immense gathering and the bearing of the men in the ranks were such that as Mr. J.B. Concannon very aptly put in afterwards “it would make one proud of being an Irishman after having witnessed that day’s proceedings”.

Fully 5,000 people were present, and the strength of the different companies was over 2,000. The interest taken in the review by Galway citizens and merchants may be judged by the fact that many big stores and warehouses were closed down for the day, while three steamers in the dock were allowed to remain idle. Galway City was well represented, but when the question of population is considered, it lost badly in comparison with the country contingents.

In fact, the little village of Craughwell had as many men as Galway. It is hoped, therefore, that the counsel of Col. Moore will not be lost on the citizens, and that when the next review comes round the capital and chief town of the West will set a good example to the country contingents by sending at least eight or ten companies.

1939

Galway’s liner traffic

The transatlantic holiday traffic is once again in full swing and again on Saturday and Sunday, Galway port presented very busy scenes. The homeward-bound Cunard White Star liner, Samaria, arrived at the port on Saturday and was in the harbour for close-on six hours.

One hundred and ten passengers debarked from the liner in the afternoon and arrived at Galway docks on the tender, Cathair na Gaillimhe, shortly after eight o’clock. On the following morning, the Cunard White Star liner, Laconia, outward-bound for Boston and New York arrived and took on board a number of passengers for the Atlantic crossing.

Galway man’s heroism

Mr. Martin Browne, Liam Mellowes Terrace, claims to have rescued about fifty people from danger of death, and certainly the number who owe their lives to his bravery are many. On Friday afternoon, he effected another gallant rescue from Galway docks.

At about 8 o’clock on Friday evening, a four-year-old boy, Alfred Murray, son of Mr. John Murray, stevedore, employed by the Limerick Steamship Company, fell into the sea just outside the gates of the Commercial dock.

Mr. Browne, pausing only to divest himself of his coat and cap, jumped off the pier and, with the assistance of Mr. Patrick O’Donnell, dockgateman, brought the boy to safety. Were it not for Mr. Browne’s promptitude and bravery, the little boy would undoubtedly have lost his life.

Despite Mr. Browne’s many acts of heroism – acts performed unostentatiously and in the spirit which prompted him to withdraw quietly immediately he had performed his gallant deed on Friday evening – he has never received any public tribute other than two small monetary awards. The suggestion has been made that his latest act of courage should be brought to the notice of the Carnegie Hero Trust.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Pupils of St Mary's College, Ballygar, waiting for tea at the opening of the school's new extension on December 10, 1982.

1922

State is recognised

At 3.30 on the morning of December 6, 1921, a Treaty between Great Britain and Ireland was signed in a room in London. In pursuance of that Treaty, the Government of the Irish Free State was handed over to Mr. Michael Collins on January 16 of the present year.

This week the Free State became a fait accompli, recognised by all the nations of the earth, ratified by its own Parliament and that of Great Britain. This is the great central historical fact which nothing can alter.

In other times under other conditions, this would be a week of general jubilation in Ireland. There can be no doubt about the feelings in the hearts of the majority of people. They feel with the late Mr. Arthur Griffith that “the substance of freedom” has been won, with President Cosgrove that the Irish Government “takes over the control and destiny of our people to hold and administer that charge, answerable only to our own people and to none other; to conduct their affairs as they shall declare, right without interference, not to domination, by any other authority whatsoever on this earth.”

For the Free State has the power, by right of international treaty, to maintain military, naval and air forces, to impose tariffs, to control its own finances absolutely, to make its own laws.

And there is firm hope that before long the green, white and orange of the tricolour will wave triumphantly over not twenty-six counties merely, but over all Ireland.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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