Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

The Bermuda Showband from Loughrea pictured at Silver Strand in 1967. Among the line-up were Brendan Shaughnessy (Vocals), John Colohan (Lead Guitar), Larry Cooley (Second Guitar), John Small (Bass), Noel Donnellan (Trunmpet), Donal Herlihy (Sax/Clarinet), Benedict Donnellan (Trombone) and Paddy Fallon (Drums).

1918

House tarred

A startling occurrence is reported from Athenry, where, on Wednesday night week, the house of Mrs. K. O’Neill, The Square, was tarred. Mrs. O’Neill’s house has been under police supervision since the beginning of the New Year, and the only reason that can be assigned for the tarring of her premises is that a relative of hers bought at a public auction recently a certain house property situated at the Square.

A representative of the “Tribune” learned that the house property in question, which fronts the Square, and adjoins Mr. Lynch’s drapery, was built by a Mrs. Broderick. Portion of the premises then built, but not included in the recent sale, is at present occupied by Mrs O’Flynn, a daughter of Mrs. Broderick. After Mrs. Broderick’s death, the larger and main portion came into the possession of her son, Mr. John F. Broderick. His interest was bought by a Mr. Bernard Nolan, on whose death the business was carried on by his wife, who married a Mr. Leavy.

For the past two years or thereabouts, she has ceased to do business in the premises, and on the 29th December last, the house was auctioned by order of the Courts.

A number of bidders, including solicitors and auctioneers, attended at the auction, and the property was knocked down to Mr. Hayes at £445.

Asked if she had any statement to make regarding the tarring, Mrs. O’Neill named certain parties as being responsible. She denied that it was for her use Mr. Hayes bought the property. It might have been for his sister that Mr. Hayes bought it. The auction was open to any person who wished to bid. She denied that her house had been fired into.

Mrs O’Flynn, The Square, said that she had hoped she would have been able to secure ownership of the house, which had been built by her mother, and she did not expect she would have any opposition at the auction. She had been prepared to pay more than any reserved price.

1943

Port for Connacht

Somewhat in the manner of the Skibbereen Eagle which became famous long ago by announcing that it was “keeping an eye on the Tsar”, our Waterford contemporary, the Evening News, has warned us that it is watching Galway with dark suspicion.

Because we commented on the fact that Tramore had been given pride of place in the Irish Tourist Board’s development schemes at a time when there was no suggestion of anything being done for Galway and Salthill our contemporary declares that “for some time past Galway has been displaying a hostile complex about Waterford” and it reads a deeply sinister meaning into the decision to send a deputation to Dublin with a view of getting more ships for our hard-hit port.

“This move,” says the Evening news, “looks rather like an effort to exert ‘undue influence’ on the Government to divert traffic from other ports,” and it goes on to proclaim “Waterford will endeavour to prevent any diversion of what little shipping now comes into our fine, safe and conveniently located harbour.”

Truly, all is yellow to the jaundiced eye, but for sheer unadulterated ráiméis, we have seldom read an editorial pronouncement to equal this. Nobody will be more surprised that the members of the Galway deputation to learn that they are going up to Dublin to “exert undue influence” on the Government.

They are under the impression that the object of the deputation is to place before the responsible authorities the full facts as to the complete absence of shipping from this port for the past year and more, and to suggest that it should be possible to send at least one cargo boat a month to discharge and load at Galway docks.

Military ‘attack’

From 2p.m. to 6p.m. on Sunday, large-scale exercise in which all of the voluntary services of the district took part, were carried out in Loughrea. The town was “attacked” at 3 o’clock from all sides by L.D.F. units from neighbouring villages, while units from the town defended.

Incidents arising from these engagements brought the L.S.F. into action and this branch had a busy time dealing with attempted “bank robberies”, “looting of food depots”, etc.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

"How do Jacob's get the figs into the Fig Rolls?" was a question that captured the imagination of Ireland when it was first used as part of a marketing campaign by Jacob's for their leading biscuit. Jim Figgerty, pictured here with locals in Loughrea on July 3, 1970, was the only man with the answer! Played by actor Patrick Griffin, Jim Figgerty was part of the company's television campaign in the 1960s and early 1970s and visited towns across the country to promote the brand.

1922

The demon drink

The most contemptible of all types of mankind is he who partakes of intoxicating drink throughout the entire day and far into the night. He is never drunk, nor is he ever sober. He is appropriately called a “soaker”.

At the meeting of the Ard-Fheis, Mr. de Valera made a statement which, to those who do not understand the full significance, may not have appeared very germane to the issue. But we are given to understand that his declaration that he was “sorry the drink evil was coming again to the country” was timely, and ought to be followed up with strong action by those upon whom the discipline and good conduct of the Irish people, and the army, which is their servant, depends.

Mr de Valera said he believed he was expressing the united view of every member of the Dáil and of the Officer Board of Sinn Féin when he said that he believed Ireland was really in danger the time the drink evil came back. They wanted the support of the organisation to end that evil, and generally, restore order.

We are informed by clergymen who know rural County Galway and the habits of the people intimately that the young men of to-day do not drink to intoxication, but they have acquired more dangerous habits in certain areas: they “soak” drink for long periods at a time, and their addled minds are, therefore, open to any suggestion of mischief or evil, whilst their power to do honest work such as strong clean men glory in is dulled.

Inevitably, demoralisation follows. We trust that this tale of degeneracy is exaggerated, but we very much fear that it is too true. The fact that Mr. de Valera should make public reference to it at the Ard-Fheis is significant.

“Half the mischief,” a well-known clergyman informs us, “is hatched out at cross-roads public houses by men who spend hours there when they might be doing honest work at home.”

It is well that the country should be aroused immediately to this most insidious of all dangers, for if alcoholic demoralisation should spread, then of a surety the road to utter demoralisation and ruin would be a speedy one to travel, and all the best traditions of our Irish manhood would soon be undermined.

Although we do not, and never have, advocated total abstinence against temperance, better a thousand times that we should lose altogether the liberty to touch intoxicants than that our young men, and, alas, also some of our women, should be reduced to the degrading level of “soakers”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Some of those confirmed at Kilmacduagh on May 6, 1970.

1922

Collins interview

Mr. Michael Collins told Mr. John Steele of the “Chicago Tribune” in an interview to which the romantic interest of the head of a new State attaches that he had just returned from the country where he had spent the week-end reading John Mitchell’s account of the American Revolution and the years following.

This might pass, he said, for a history of the present days in Ireland – “there are the same divisions, the same disorders, the same rebellious elements. America won thorough. So shall we.”

Following this optimistic note, the head of the Provisional Government told Mr. Steele that if Mr. de Valera and his followers refuse to cooperate to end the campaign of anarchy, then he is prepared to fight.

But it will not be civil war. It will be simply a police measure. “If this peace effort fails,” he is reported to have said, “then there will be no other. Every avenue of co-operation will have been explored, and we shall have to take strong action to restore order in the country. It is not an easy problem; for a revolutionary Government, in the nature of things, must take some account of motives. There is a lot of plain looting, robbery and violence going on.

“That is common criminality and must be punished. Also, there is a certain amount of commandeering from what, after all, is a patriotic, if misguided motive. That, too, must be stopped; but it requires a different method. Then there is the question of disarmament. There are too many guns in the country – uncontrolled guns, I mean – and they’ve got to be got in. a gun is a dangerous thing for a young man to have. Some day he may use it in a quarrel over a girl, or over a shilling, or over a word. That is one of the problems the revolutionary Government has got to solve, and is determined to solve, but it cannot be done in a day or two.”

He added that Irish people had the right to vote at an election, even if they voted wrongly.

Second bite of apple

The residence of Captain Gardiner, Lismanny, was raided by armed men on Saturday night and a Ford car taken.

It is stated that when visited some time ago, the car could not be taken away as it was out of order and the raiders had to content themselves by taking the wheels.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

County Galway dancers who won many trophies in competitions over two weeks in June 1967 pictured with their trophies in Eyre Square on June 26, 1967. From left: Breda Keedy, Ballinasloe, who won the shield for the single jig at Athlone Feis, Mary Kelly, Ballinasloe, who won the minor championship (under 11) at Athlone and the minor championship at Drumshambo Feis, Esther McGough, Tuam, who won the under 9 championship at Athlone and Rosemary Mannion, Gort who won the minor competition at Carrickedmund, Co Westmeath and the under 13 competition at Athlone.

1922

Raids and robberies

During the past week a regular epidemic of raids and robberies has taken place in and around East Galway, as a result of which considerable sums of money, jewellery, clothing etc. have been taken away from their owners.

In certain districts scarcely a residence has been immune from the midnight marauders who continue to pursue their nefarious deeds with unrelenting vigour, and in the present state of things, apparently, without fear of detection.

To the least observant, it is obvious that the parties who perpetrate these outrageous are a band who avail of the unsettled condition of affairs now existing, and all right-thinking persons, anxious for the restoration of normal conditions, will earnestly hope that peace will soon come to our distracted land so long torn by internal strife, and that there will soon be an end to crime which tends to disgrace a country once famous for its honour and chivalry.

Home raided

At two a.m. on Sunday morning the residence of Mr. John Cobban, a Presbyterian farmer living at Shanbally, about three English miles from Ballinasloe, was raided by a party of armed and disguised men who arrived in a motor car.

Entrance was affected by breaking a pane of glass in a window through which one of the party got in and opened the door for the others.

The raiders then searched the house, taking with them some jewellery, overcoats, £5 in cash, and a suit of clothes belonging to Mr. John Cobban, junr., and also his watch. Mr. Cobban is a Scotchman who has lived in the district for about fifty years.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending