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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Enda Cunningham

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Comm Games teams 14 June 1980 1

1914

Home Rule celebrations

At Headford Petty Sessions, Galway, Mr. Michael Doherty, licensed publican, was prosecuted for a breach of the Licensing Act.

Constable Quirke stated that on the 28th May he entered the licensed premises and saw a party there who was not a bona-fide traveller.

Mr. Concannon, solr., on behalf of both defendants, admitted the charge and said that the offence happened on a night of great rejoicing not only in Headford, but everywhere.

It was the night of the passing of the Home Rule Bill.

Mr. Comerford (D.I., prosecuting): Not everywhere.

Mr. Concannon: We had it in Tuam.

Mr. Comerford: Tuam is not everywhere – not in Ulster.

Mr. Concannon: We have our own Volunteers as well as Ulster.

The publican was fined 20s. and costs.

Kinvara ‘gun fight’

At Kinvara Petty Sessions, Mr. O’Beirne, D.I., summoned Thomas Shaughnessy and Michael Staunton, for disorderly conduct. Thomas Kearns deposed that he was in Gill’s public-house. Shaughnessy came in and asked Staunton something about a revolver he had in his hand.

A tussle ensued between the defendants, in the course of which the revolver left Staunton’s possession.

Sergeant Reilly slated he considered it advisable to have both defendants bound to the peace. The Bench ordered the defendants to enter into a bond, themselves in £10, and two sureties of £5 each, to keep the peace.

1939

‘Late’ nurses cautioned

At a meeting of Galway Hospitals and Dispensaries Committee, the secretary recalled that three girls had been reported out of the Central Hospital until four o’clock one morning. They had been asked for an explanation and they now wrote stating that they arrived at the porter’s lodge at 12.30am, got in over the wall and in through the window of the dormitory.

They were sorry that this occurred and added that it had not been their intention when leaving the hospital to remain out later than the usual time.

The matron wrote stating that she looked on the fault as serious, but as the girls had long service in the institution, she asked the committee not to deal with the matter more seriously than to curtail the girls’ weekly late pass.

The committee agreed to leave the matter pass with a caution. Mr. Lydon remarked that girls going out on bikes found it very difficult to time their return.

100 year-old trees felled

James Finn, Moorpark, was prosecuted under the Forestry Act for cutting trees on his land without having got permission from the guards. For similar offences, Joseph Corbett, Shudane, and Martin Rabbitt, Fahy’s Village, were also prosecuted. Mr R.J. Kelly, State Solicitor, prosecuted.

Guard Bodkin said that on January 26 he found four beech trees felled on Finn’s land. The trees were over 100 years old and were only suitable for firewood.

Guard Kerins said he found eleven trees cut on Corbett’s land. Corbett told the Justice they had to cut the trees for firewood owing to the bad season for turf last year. There were nine or ten people getting the timber for firewood and he did not receive and did not ask any money for it.

Guard Henry said he found one beech tree felled on Martin Rabbitt’s land.

Mr Kelly said the prosecutions in cases of this kind were becoming frequent. The offences appeared to have all occurred early in the present year. There were very little formalities to be gone through in getting permission from the guards, who gave such applications very favourable consideration. He was instructed to ask for penalties in these cases as a warning to others.

The Justice said he didn’t like to see three prosecutions coming together as it should total disregard of the Act. It was all pure carelessness as the guards showed sympathetic consideration to all applicants for leave to cut trees, especially for firewood.

If these offences continued in the district, he would impose a stiff penalty. He fined defendants 4s., 11s., and 1s., respectively.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Crowds flocked to the unveiling of a monument on June 15, 1959, to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the landing of Alcock and Brown at Derrygimlagh Bog.

1921

British Empire’s decay

History records the rise and fall of many empires. When nations reach the zenith of their power, they begin to decay, and often “great is the fall there of.”

That the British Empire is on the down grade is becoming more apparent every day. There are many cases contributing to this decline, but perhaps England’s treatment of the sister island is one of the chief.

That great soldier-statesman, General Smutts, predicted that unless justice was meted out to Ireland, the Empire would suffer. When he made that prediction, the Coalition Government had not sent over the “Black and Tans” to keep order in Ireland, nor had their barbarous reprisals shocked humanity.

What would he say now if he expressed his views on England’s treatment of the sister isle? He would say what the Press of every nation is saying: she is destroying her moral prestige in the eyes of the world. Other nations today incline to look upon her as the Irish nation has always looked upon her.

As Lloyd George is responsible for the “bad peace” and the present muddle in Europe, he is responsible more than any living man for the work of disintegration going on in the Empire.

Frightfulness in the face of revolt against a civil population, vicarious punishment of innocent for guilty is the measure of his statesmanship.

Councillors’ arrest

Eight members of the Galway County Council, who travelled to Galway on Wednesday to attend a special meeting to discuss finances and consult with the rate-collectors, were arrested on their way to the courthouse where the meeting was to have been held at twelve o’clock.

The meeting was summoned by the vice-chairman, Miss Alice Cashel.

As Miss Cashel was on her way to the meeting she was arrested by plain clothes policemen between the post office and Moon’s Corner, and conveyed to Eglinton police station.

She had arrived in town on the previous evening to attend the meeting. She was searched by two lady searchers, and removed to Renmore.

Martin Forde, P. C. Curley, John Cloherty, Martin Finnerty, Michael Finnegan, Michael Keaveney and Michael Hawthorne, other members of the county council, were also arrested by plain clothes policemen outside the courthouse and taken to Eglinton-st.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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Children play on the frozen flood water between Grattan Road and Beach Court on January 1, 1979. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

1921

Shots exchanged

A telegram from our North Galway representative yesterday stated: –

A report reached Tuam last night that Sergeant Beglan and Constable McGuire, of Castlegrove temporary police station, were fired at when on patrol duty at about eight p.m., and returned the fire.

Some men with revolvers appeared on top of a ditch and called on the police to halt. Shots were discharged. The police returned the fire, and after a short exchanged, the attacking party withdrew.

The fire on either side does not appear to have taken any affect.

Our reporter telegraphed later: –

It is stated that the police were fired at near Castlegrove as they were going to a shop for provisions. They were in the act of crossing a stile when the shots went off.

Rifle cartridges were subsequently found at the site of the ambush. One of the police stood and had a narrow escape, whilst the other threw himself on the ground.

Seeking compensation

Messrs. Grossman and Co., Belfast, applied for £40 compensation for injury to a motor car at Loughrea on October 27, 1920. – Francis Rock, Belfast applied for £10 compensation for injury to an overcoat on the same occasion.

Dr. Comyn, who appeared for the applicant, said this was a most peculiar case. This gentleman, Mr. Francis Rock, was a commercial traveller who lived in Belfast. He travelled for jewellery for the other applicant, Messrs. Grossman and Co.

On the evening of October 27, this gentleman was in Loughrea in the ordinary course of his duty for Messrs. Grossman and Co., who supplied him with a motor for the purpose of carrying on his business. He had what was known as a hooded Ford car for carrying his wares behind, and on the date in question he left the Railway Hotel at Loughrea and proceeded up the Main-st. in the direction of the West Bridge.

There was a party of uniformed policemen – none of them local police – travelling in two lorries some distance in front of Mr. Rock’s car. The police pulled up near the West Bridge and started firing down the main street. Mr. Rock, seeing them fire down the street, tried to turn his car around quickly when a bullet passed through his overcoat.

There were several bullets put into the hood of the motor, rendering it quite useless, and a new hood would now be required.

“It was only fair to state,” Dr. Comyn proceeded, “that there would be a good deal more damage done that evening were it not for the plucky action of the District-inspector Keohane and the Loughrea police who, at the risk of their own lives, walked up against the firing party and ordered them out of the town – for which the people of Loughrea were extremely grateful.”

His Honour, having heard the evidence of the applicant, awarded £20 compensation, adding that this was a case in which he was judicially satisfied that the damage was not caused by civilians, and he would accordingly bring the mater under the notice of the Crown authorities.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

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Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

The only road hazard Eileen O'Donoghue and Bridget Ann Walsh met while competing in the first Connemara Marathon in the Inagh Valley in 2002. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

1921

Peace moves
It is now no secret that Mr. Eamonn de Valera is in Dublin (says the “Freeman’s Journal” of yesterday), and it is evidently admitted by the Irish Office in London. There have been rumours that an official pronouncement would shortly be made by the leader of Sinn Féin.
The “Freeman’s Journal”, through a series of circumstances, claims to be able to give its readers and exclusive forecast of the statements which will probably be contained in this pronouncement.
In view of the suggestions of a peace move by the leaders of Sinn Féin, which have been appearing in the English Press, the statement of policy attributed to Mr. de Valera will give little encouragement to the hope of Irishmen who have been looking for a constitutional settlement in the near future.
Mr. de Valera maintains that any peace move must have for its basis the recognition by the English Government that Ireland is an independent nation on an equal footing. When the representatives of the English nation are prepared to meet the representatives of the Irish nation on an equal national footing peace talks will be possible.
Some surprise has been expressed that Mr. de Valera should have left America just when his new organisation, which has broken away from Friends of Irish Freedom, was in its infancy.
Mr. de Valera’s reply to this is that in view of the pressure of the Government upon Ireland at present, it was only natural that he should return to take up the burden of his office.
With the arrest of Mr. Arthur Griffith and Professor Eoin MacNeill, it is said that Mr. de Valera is being searched for most assiduously by the forces of the Crown, and that there is evidence that they are most anxious to place him under arrest.
We are informed that Mr. de Valera has been in communication with many of the more prominent heads of the Sinn Féin Party, who have reported to him the general situation throughout the country.

New caretakers
A number of unemployed ex-servicemen in Galway – between forty and sixty, it is reported – have accepted positions as camp and store caretakers and guards for the auxiliary division of the R.I.C.
A dozen attendants at Ballinasloe Asylum, who have not received any wages for some time owing to the straitened financial circumstances of that institution, are also reported to have joined “the new police force.”

 

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

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