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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Romping home: Dirty Dick with Reginald Concannon up winning the Salthill Fiesta Donkey Derby raced at St Joseph's School, Salthill, in June 1977.

1914

Reprehensible Tuam assault

At Tuam Petty Sessions, Mr. Comerford, D.I., summoned Wm. Jordan, Barrack-street, for assaulting John Ruane, Galway road, Tuam.

Constable Colleran deposed that on June 11th he was on duty at half-past two at the Square he saw the defendant strike Ruane with an ash plant. Ruane had his hand raised to ward off the blow. Ruane’s hat was cut, apparently the result of a blow to the head.

John Ruane, the assaulted man, stated there was an argument in progress between the defendant and another man, and witness spoke to the latter not to mind defendant, who was drunk. Defendant then hit him a blow on the head with an ash plant. He also struck him on the arm. He did not give the defendant any provocation.

Mr. E.J. Concannon deposed that the first thing he saw the defendant doing was making a vicious blow at Ruane, who was not saying anything to him.

“I never saw a more audacious or blackguardly attempt to injure an old man, who is between eighty and ninety years of age. It was the most blackguardly thing I ever saw.”

Mr. Concannon stated the defendant was going round the town the whole morning looking for a fight until he met the unfortunate man Ruane, who was unable to defend himself.

Sergt. Martin said the defendant was a hard working man in a general dealer’s business. He was on the road every day. He was in the habit of taking and keeping the pledge for twelve months. When he began drinking, he continued until he had all his money spent. When drinking he was not responsible for anything he did. There was nothing against him except charges of drunkenness.

The Bench having consulted, the Chairman announced that the defendant was convicted of a most reprehensible and blackguardly assault on an old man.

If he (Chairman) was acting by himself, he would inflict a heavier sentence than he was about to announce. The sentence of the court was that he be imprisoned for three weeks, at the end of which he should enter into a bond to be of good behaviour for twelve months.

1939

Sheer blackguardism

“It is nothing but sheer, downright blackguardism the manner in which some of the young men – and young ladies, too – create a disturbance going home at night from the dances held here,” said Mr. D.J. O’Connor, when he addressed six hundred dancers at the conclusion of a most enjoyable dance held in the Pavilion, Salthill, on Sunday night.

“Numerous complaints have been made to the licencee of the Pavilion, Mr. Thos. O’Toole, and to myself by a number of respected citizens of Galway and Salthill of the conduct of certain young men going home from dances.

Complaints have also been made to the Gardai. I know some of the offenders, and it would give me the greatest pleasure to supply their names to the Gardai. I do, however, make this last appeal to you, and I ask you to please return home from dances in a mannerly fashion.”

Ready for the Races

For the past three months Messrs. John McNally and Co., the well-known Galway contractors, have been busily engaged in erecting a new modern roof stand at the famous Galway racecourse at Ballybrit to the plans of Mr. R.G. Emerson, architect, Taylor’s Hill.

This is but one of the numerous improvements upon which the Race Committee has entered in preparation for the annual meeting which will be held on Wednesday and Thursday, August 2 and 3, and the total cost of this year’s extensions alone amounts to nearly £5,000.

The new roof to the concrete stand is of reinforced concrete, and is 57 yards in length, affording accommodation for 1,000 people. In addition to a complete view of the course from start to finish, it also affords a wide survey of Galway Bay, the Aran Islands and the Clare hills.

The carpark leading to the enclosure has been extended considerably, and will now afford accommodation for 4,000 vehicles, while the enclosure itself has been extended to a quarter of a mile.

A novel innovation is a ladies’ park, which has been built at the Galway end, with a rock garden in the centre, flower beds, seats and a cocktail bar.

The stake for the Galway Plate this year will be over £1,000.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking part in the West of Ireland Bridge Congress at UCG in April 1983 were Phil Carey, Newcastle, Eileen Murphy, Taylor's Hill, Carmel Howard, Cross Street and Claire Burke, Salthill. This year’s Bridge Congress is taking place next week at the Ardilaun Hotel from February 3 to February 5.

1923

Islanders’ distress

A correspondent sends authentic particulars of distress prevailing in the Islands of Aran. There is extreme poverty in Inishmore, especially in Killeany; large numbers in the village are on the verge of starvation, kept alive by the charity of neighbours, with scarcely a healthy child amongst them.

The people own no land, notwithstanding that the Congested Districts Board has a large tract; they fish and labour when the former is profitable or practicable and when the work can be found. To-day they are without either.

Similar stories come from other island villages. Yet last October Mr. Blythe stated in the Dáil that £1,000 had been granted for the relief of distress on the islands. The money was placed at the disposal of the Galway Rural District Council, which refused to have anything to do with the scheme.

Accordingly, the grant was never made. It is alleged that the inhabitants of Inishmore have refused to pay rates, but islanders state in reply that rates were not collected for some two years, nor were demand notes issued. The whole position is so grave that it should be looked into without further delay, and we understand that all the circumstances have been referred to Deputy O’Connell for this purpose.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Students Yvonne O’Byrne, Edel Comer, Janice Butler, Orla Casserley, Lisa Small, Sinéad Irvine, Emer Burke, Alva McManus and Ciara Hanley who took part in the Dominican College, Taylor's Hill, production of the musical 'My Fair Lady' at the Rosary Hall in January 1998.

1923

Narrow escape

A party of four men, who arrived in the village in a motor-car, engaged in a murderous attack on the barracks occupied by the unarmed Civic Guard at Ahascragh, Ballinasloe, about three a.m. on Wednesday.

Shots and bombs were fired through the windows, and some of the sleeping guards had narrow escapes from bullets, and subsequently had to dash through the petrol-inspired flames for safety.

The village is a peaceable one, and the Guards have recently been carrying out their work in it with quiet efficiency. During the recent warfare, there had been no disturbance in the neighbourhood.

The Guards retired as usual on Tuesday night, and about three a.m. on Wednesday morning they were awakened by the crash of rifles.

A moment later flames sprang up, and it was seen that the barracks had been sprinkled with petrol and fired. Bombs were first fired through the windows, then petrol was thrown in, and the place was set on fire.

The small body of four Guards found themselves compelled to seek shelter from the bullets, and then they had to make a dash to escape the flames that were springing up around them.

Sergeant Rodgers had an exceedingly narrow escape, a bullet grazing his head. Guard Grimes was sleeping beneath a window when it was broken and petrol thrown over his head.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

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Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking part in the Coláiste Iognáid production of A Tale of Two Cities in the Jesuit Hall, Sea Road, in February1998 were Cathal Cunningham, Michael Roche and Richard Curtin.

1923

Education is key

This week or the beginning of next, Irish boys and girls return to school. On the work that they do there during the succeeding years will largely depend the future of Ireland, for as the plant is bent, so shall the tree become.

Judged by the present day standard of ethics and conduct, something has been sadly lacking in the spiritual and secular training of the past.

Recently, a controversy – if it could be dignified with the name – has been running in the correspondence columns of the “Tribune”, on the future of education. It seems a thousand pities, if, indeed, it is not a definite national drawback, that intelligent men like national school teachers cannot discuss a subject that is of vital interest to them and their country in temperate language, without getting lost in a miasma of irrelevant abuse.

Yet it must be frankly and sadly confessed that those who have entered into correspondence on the subject have added little to the discussion. The controversy was begun by a contributor, who had very definite views, with which we did not altogether agree, but if the points at issue had been adhered to, it might have served a very useful purpose.

Teaching journals are clamouring that the general public do not take any interest in education. If to take an interest in education is to bring a hornets’ nest to one’s ears, then surely the invitation is a little ungracious.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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