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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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At the opening of the extension to the Franciscan Brothers' Agricultural College in Mountbellew in September 1975. The opening of the €400,000 extension was performed by the Taoiseach, Liam Cosgrave. The project involved the demolition of certain sections of the old existing college and the provision of new classrooms, library, science laboratory, gymnasium, sleeping and catering facilities.

1917

A cowardly practice

For some time past, a large number of dogs have been found poisoned in the streets of the city. Last week, a valuable dog, the property of Mr. W.E. Binns, B.E., was destroyed. The poison is laid in the principal streets on bread and meat. Such a cruel proceeding is strongly to be condemned.

Price of light

Indignation continues to be expressed by consumers in the town at the increase in the price of electric light. A movement is on foot to call a public meeting in the Town Hall to protest against the increase, and to appoint a deputation to wait on the Manager in regard to the matter.

Cocks ablaze

On Friday night, at about 10 o’clock, four cocks of hay, the property of Mr. Hugh Fahy, went on fire at Terryland near the waterworks. Mr. Molloy, the Town Steward, and the Fire Brigade, assisted by the police, were soon at the scene of the conflagration, and set to work to subdue the flames. They succeeded in saving a number of stacks of corn, but the hay was completely destroyed. A claim for £150 malicious injury was lodged at the meeting of Galway Urban Council on Thursday by Mr. Fahy.

A great catch

The Claddagh Fishing Fleet has been having the time of its life during the week. Thirty boards were out on Tuesday night, and returned with a magnificent take of herring, the principal shoals being caught in the Ardfry district. It is an interesting fact that the ordinary fishing boats outdid the C.D. Board trawlers, inasmuch as the principal takes were obtained in the shallow waters of Ardfry, where the deeper nets of the trawlers could not be utilised. This is the first time since the ceremony of blessing the waters of the Bay took place a month ago that there has been any successful herring fishing, and the swarthy and energetic sailors of the Claddagh are availing of the advantage gained with energy. Herrings were sold in Galway for export at 17s. and 18s. per cwt., as compared with 5s. and 6s. per cwt. in pre-war times. Some men who had shares in the boats made as much as £1/5s. on their single night’s fishing.

1942

Make roads safe

The importance of repairing the small roads of the county and making the main roads safe for horse traffic was discussed by the meeting of Galway County Council. Co. Manager Mr. O’Flynn pointed out that if they left the road margins untarred that the roads would rapidly deteriorate.

Mr. O’Kelly said that they had a better type of road in Tipperary – a road on which horses could travel in safety.

The County Surveyor said that he had laid the Threadneedle Road in Galway with creo-phalt and he could lay other roads with creo-phalt as was done in Tipperary, but the Council had refused to allow him the money – it would mean more expenditure.

Mr. Beegan said that if the County Surveyor had explained that matter more clearly to the Council in the past, they would have been more generous.

County Surveyor: For the past 18 years, I have been bringing forward that proposal to make the roads non-slippery. I will have it in my estimate again.

Ballinasloe Show success

An increase in the number of entries in the horse, cattle, garden and home industries sections of Ballinasloe Show on Monday and Tuesday more than offset a decline in the entries in the farm and poultry sections, and the total number of exhibits was over one thousand, and higher than last year’s figure.

Widespread potato rot

Further reports of potato rot continue to come in from an increasing number of areas in Connemara. Although digging operations have not yet commenced on a large scale, the indications are that the rot has been fairly widespread and alarming.

Reports from Carna and the Aran Islands are almost as disquieting as those from the Carraroe and Lettermore areaas. Unfortunately, the flour supply in the latter areas is still anything but satisfactory and strict rationing is being exercised by the storekeepers.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A scene from the Clifden Amateur Dramatic Society’s pantomime performance of Robin Hood held in the town’s parish hall on January 12, 1983.

1922

Sovereign rights

The right of opinion, especially in politics, is one conceded in all nations, but that right depends entirely on an unwritten code of honesty and honour that in forming his opinion every citizen makes use of honest intelligence and reason in guiding his judgement and is because a citizen is above lies and misrepresentation in matters affecting the national wellbeing and prosperity of his country.

On this date, January 15, 1922, every man in the West is (if not alien on Ireland’s soil or temporarily in residence) a Citizen of the Irish Free State, under the authority of the Provisional Government of Ireland. This Provisional Government consists of men chosen by the Irish people to represent them and by none others, and is to be in a few months replaced by one composed of those chosen by the Irish people.

Let us now, in endeavouring to point out certain dangers, bring home to the plain people the ordinary meanings of ordinary words.

Sovereign means supreme in power.

Supreme means highest and greatest.

Sovereign rights of the people mean the highest and greatest powers of the people. Now the highest powers are those born in, given to, inherited, owned by the people, to control fully the Government of the country, or in other words, Government of the people by the people.

These God-given rights of the people had been for ages denied the people not alone of Ireland, but of other countries, so the word republic came to signify these rights, and hence we turn up a dictionary printed and published in the U.S. and we read: “Republic – A nation or state governed by representatives elected by the citizens.”

Let me here point out that the Irish Free State now comes wholly and completely into that class, and no other, and that she has once again become, even unwelcomed by her own.

A thatcher at work on the roof of a house close to the Bishop’s Gate at Lower Salthill on March 4, 1966.

Restoring order

Now that the government of the country is passing into the hands of Irishmen, who will have control of all matters affecting the welfare of the old land, it is the duty of all classes and creeds to unite in their efforts to see that law and order will be efficiently enforced, and that there will not be any repetition of the recent looting of shops, which, owing to the frequency with which it occurred, could be regarded as nothing less than a scandal.

In conjunction with the R.I.C., the I.R. police of Galway have taken strong measures to cope with the “epidemic”, and in other ways are leaving noting undone to restore order.

In view of these circumstances, it is to be hoped that all right-meaning citizens and men of good-will, interested in the country’s welfare, will give every possible assistance in the preservation of order, which will reflect the fact that the nation is governed and controlled as a Christian community should be.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of the cast of the Renmore Panto in 1979/1980.

1922

Violent assault

At Loughrea Quarter Sessions, before his honour Judge Doyle, K.C., Mrs. Anne Lowry, Carhoon, Tynagh, claimed £100 compensation for the alleged kidnapping of her daughter, Julia Goonan (under age), by armed and disguised men, and for the cutting of her hair on the night of October 6 last. Mr. Mulcair, solr., appeared for the applicant.

Julia Goonan, examined by her solicitor, stated she was seventeen years of age, and the daughter of Mrs. Annie Lowry, who resided at Carhoon, in the Portumna district. Witness was at her service with a man named Patrick Harte, Athenry-road, Loughrea, for about six months.

On the night of the 6th October last, four disguised men came to Mr. Harte’s door and knocked. They were admitted by Mr. Harte and coming in around the kitchen asked if he had a girl in the house. He replied he had, and witness, who was in a room off the kitchen at the time, was preparing to go to bed.

“The men, who were looking about everywhere,” proceeded witness, “saw me in the room and they pulled me out. They took a shawl that was hanging on the door and wrapping it around me took me to a motor that was outside and put me into it. I saw another man standing beside the driver when I came out to the car. They then drove me up as far as Nonie Ryan’s house at the other end of the town and on arriving there, took out Nonie Ryan and put her into the motor.

“I noticed some men outside Ryan’s house when the car stopped. They then drove us away up the Ballinasloe road, and when we had gone about three miles they blindfolded us. One of the men gave me a few slaps across the face.”

To his honour: Witness did not know the men. They were masked and blackened.

Continuing, witness stated the men, who apparently went astray, drove them around the roads from twenty minutes to twelve on Wednesday night, October 6, until three o’clock on the following morning. At Knockbrack witness was ordered out of the car and taken away about twenty yards, still blindfolded. She was “hung up” by the hair by one of the men and another shaved her hair in to the bone.

His honour: Don’t girls “bob” their hair to make themselves look attractive? (laughter).

Witness: They do, your honour.  – His honour: Did they “bob” your hair or cut it off altogether? – Witness: They cut it off altogether.

Mr. Mulcair: It is apparently growing now. When I saw her after the incident, she was very bare.

In further evidence, witness said the men told her wile in the motor they would take her to Athlone barracks and get two nice Black and Tans for herself and her companion. They subsequently stated they would take them to Ballinasloe barracks, and finally left them at her mother’s house in Carhoon in the morning.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Dancers in the Renmore Parish Pantomime, Jack and the Beanstalk, on December 10, 1979. This promotional photo of Anne Sandys, Susan Walsh, Carole Cawley, Mary Stankard, Gisela Junold and Rosalyn Keane, was published in the Tribune ahead of staging at the Jesuit Hall in the first week of January 1980.

1921

No port like home

We produce this message in full, because it contains its lesson for the people of Galway – a lesson which if not read swiftly and acted upon promptly may be lost and may lose for the home port the one feature around which a great city could be built in the year to come.

In the years of peace and progress which lie ahead, trade will be rapidly developed between Ireland and America, and a considerable stimulus will be given to passenger service. Galway is the nearest port to the United States and Canada.

Its claims in this connection are incontestable. Indeed, we believe that those claims are accepted by men like Mr. Arthur Griffith who knows the country thoroughly.

Money to develop the country will assuredly be available in the near future, and one of the first schemes of development is likely to be the opening up of our long-disused ports.

In the future there will be no hostile Liverpool trade interests to content against. We shall be free to develop our own resources in our own way. But theirs will be rival ports on the western coast. Cobh is consolidating its position.

The Galway Port has yet to be made. The people of Galway should see that its claims are kept well in the foreground, and the representatives of Galway in the new government should have all the facts in connection with Galway placed at their disposal.

Establishment robbed

Mr. Murty O’Leary’s grocery establishment, Wood-quay, was raided at about twelve o’clock on Saturday night by burglars when tobacco, cigarettes, polish and other goods, with £5 or £6 in notes and silver were taken away.

Mrs. O’Leary had gone to midnight Mass at the time, and the door was locked when she left. Mr. O’Leary was upstairs at the time the raiders entered, and when he heard some noise at the door a few minutes after his wife had left he did not suspect that anything was wrong.

How these burglars succeeded in getting in, considering that the door was locked, remains a mystery.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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