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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway in days gone by

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1917

Motor duties not paid

At a meeting of Galway County Council, the Acting Secretary said that he had received a sheaf of letters from Mr. Kilkelly, the Council’s solicitor, from parties explaining why they considered that they should not be compelled to pay motor duties. Some of the letters stated that the owners of motor bicycles and cars had not been able to obtain petrol. Others stated that as they had not used the cars for a certain time, they should not be charged the full yearly tax.

Mr. Morris said it was hard on the man who could not use his car to have to pay.

The Chairman concurred.

Mr. P.S. McDonnell said he thought that the council would be going too far in prosecuting right, left and centre. However, as long as there was a resolution on the books, Mr. Fogarty was bound to act on it. They should be unanimous in rescinding the resolution.

Mr. McKeigue said a great many people had paid duty already, and it would not be fair to them to let the others off. Eventually, on the proposition of the Chairman, seconded by Mr. P.S. McDonnell, an order was made that no prosecutions be taken pending further instructions from the Council.

New corn mill

Mr. Winkle, of Kinvara, a gentleman who has shown a considerable amount of enterprise, and who keeps a Ford car always ready for hire, intends to open a corn mill for the district at an early date. Our readers will welcome and support all efforts at industrial revival in our local towns. We hope to afford further particulars of Mr. Winkle’s enterprise later.

1942

Corporation election

The total electorate for the Galway Corporation was 12,418 and the total poll was 6,046. Spoiled votes numbered 160 and the quota was 466. Four candidates were elected on the first county – Miss Margaret A. Ashe (Independent) (778); Mr. James Brennan (Ratepayers’ Association) (612); the Mayor, Ald. J.F. Costello (Independent) (602), and Mr. J.M. Owens (Independent) (471).

Unable to call motor vehicles into commission for the elections, many of the candidates engaged side-cars and other horse-drawn carts for the day to bring voters to the booths. Ald. MI. O’Flaherty, owner of a fleet of hackney motors, was among those who had to rely on the horse-drawn vehicle.

As the cars, all bearing the names of the candidates by whom they had been engaged, arrived outside the polling stations, other candidates and their supporters rushed to assist the voters to alight and to remind them that candidates other than those on whose cars they had come were also seeking election.

Returning thanks to those who had voted for him, Mr. Brennan referred to “one regrettable incident” which had taken place and was directed at him personally.

On the eve of the election, he said, two cards had gone through the post. On the front of one of these were the words, “Keep out Peelers, Tans and Jailers”, and on the back the words, “Help us to help you. Vote No. 1 the old Corporation.” He had spent twenty-six years in the prison service and never had come across anyone of a mind so depraved or debased as the author or the authors of that document.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Thatching one of the houses on Shantalla Road, just up from Cooke's Corner, in the 1970s.

1922

The third Dáil

The first meeting of the third Dáil held on Saturday morning last at Leinster House, Kildare-street, the premises of the Royal Dublin Society, recalled for a few minutes some of the stormy scenes at Westminster when Irish affairs were being discussed.

On Saturday, as then, Mr Laurence Ginnell was the central figure. He is apparently always cast for the role of obstructionist in politics, and on Saturday he made full use of his opportunity, with the result that, as at Westminster, he was carried form his seat by three stalwart attendants and expelled from the Assembly.

The Dáil met in the theatre of the house, a semi-circular room with seats rising tier upon tier from an open space in the centre. At the back of the last row of seats there is a promenade, and for some time before the Dáil was due to open, Mr. Ginnell, black band in hand and slouch, hat on head, marched round and round, speaking to no one, but apparently, like an arch conspirator, deep in thought.

Probably he felt lonely, for he was the only one of the anti-treaty members elected to the Dáil who put in an appearance. Miss MacSwiney and the rest, who were known to be in Dublin, have presumably decided to observe a policy of abstention.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Bridge Mills Ltd building in Galway City in the 1970s.

1922

New chief

General Richard Mulcahy, the successor of the General Michael Collins as Commander-in-Chief of the National Army, was quite unknown to the Irish people until the Insurrection of Easter, 1916, and not very prominent until considerably later than that historic and eventful episode.

He is a native of Carrick-on-Suir, County Waterford, where his father was a postmaster for several years, and he himself was engaged in the postal engineering service in addition to pursuing his studies in the National University as a student of medicine.

He fought with the Fingal Volunteers under Thomas Ashe, and with the late Frank Lawless, T.D., in the battle of Ashbourne on Friday, April 28, 1916. The details of that engagement have often been told. The Volunteers armed with shotguns and rifles, mostly captured from the R.I.C. at Swords and Donabate, attacked the police barracks at the Cross of the Rath.

The battle began at 11.25 a.m. The attackers numbered thirty-five. After half an hour, the police in the barracks were about to surrender when eighteen cars, containing reinforcements, dashed along the Slane Road. A fierce fight ensued. Lawless, with a few more Volunteers, arrived later with two can bombs – “a contribution,” wrote Mulcahy in a most vivid and graphic description of the battle, “from those who had been driven from Phibsboro Bridge.”

That was all the additional help Ashe received. The engagement lasted over three hours more, but though less than forty against a hundred R.I.C., they gained a complete victory. The constabulary were heavily punished, and the survivors put up their hands and surrendered.

At the end of the Insurrection Mulcahy was rounded up and brought to Richmond barracks, Dublin, and on May 3, with 307 other prisoners, he was marched through Dublin and sent over the water to Knutsford prison. He was released at the general amnesty which followed.

When the Volunteers were reorganised, largely in the jails and detention camps, and the Irish war projected, Richard Mulcahy was appointed Chief of Staff, with Michael Collins Chief of the Intelligence Department.

The two of them were the most important men in the great struggle, the life and soul of Ireland’s forces, the originators of some of the most audacious and successful military coups, the supervisors of the chief operations, and the men most sought for by the agents of the British Government and army.

It is very doubtful if, indeed, Mulcahy was not as greatly dreaded and as eagerly hunted for as his departed and devoted comrade in arms. He was quite as successful in eluding the sleuth of hounds as Collins himself, and he had as frequent and as narrow escapes from capture.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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