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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Mark, Gabriel and Frank Donnellan, Ballinasloe, display their prize exhibits at the Ballinasloe Fair in October 1975.

1917

Docks development

A correspondent this week strongly criticises the public men of Galway for their want of activity in regard to the development of the Harbour and Docks. It is not possible at this time, owing to war exigencies, to state the lines which such developments might follow. The conditions of any immediate development of the harbour have materially altered since the Board of Trade acceded to the request of the Harbour Board in 1914 and granted a loan of £60,000 for the deepening and widening of the channel entrance to the Docks.

Had this scheme been carried out, it would have allowed vessels of larger draft and greater carrying capacity to have entered the Docks without being dependent on the state of the tide. In other words, it would have rendered Galway harbour capable of accommodating itself to all normal goods traffic, and it would undoubtedly have the result of bringing a number of steamship companies to the western port.

Under the altered conditions brought about by the war, the estimate of €60,000 could no longer be deemed sufficient to carry out the scheme; and even if the money was placed at the disposal of the Harbour Board tomorrow, it is obvious that without the permission and authority – and, indeed, without the active assistance – of the Government, they could not succeed in carrying out the work.

1942

Countrywide blackout

It was officially announced on Wednesday night that an Order had been made by the Minister for the Co-ordination of Defence Measures containing provisions for a “blackout” of lighting throughout the country in the event of an emergency. It is stated that the Minister does not, in present circumstances, propose to bring the provisions of the Order into continuous operation.

There will, however, be early tests at intervals, for short periods, to ensure that effective preparations are being made by the public. Compliance with these tests will be compulsory and penalties may be imposed for any breach during a test.

Cyclists – front lamps must have the upper half of the front glass and the whole of any side or rear panels completely obscured, and the lower half of the reflector painted black or otherwise rendered ineffective. A red rear lamp and a white surface on the rear of the bicycle will be compulsory.

Pedestrians – torches will not be allowed unless the light is dimmed by two sheets of tissue paper, or their equivalent, and is at all times directed down and extinguished immediately on receipt of an air raid warning.

Horse-drawn vehicles – same provisions as for the front lamp on a bicycle.

Drovers – in the case of animals led or driven off a road, a lamp showing a white light must be carried in front. If the number of animals exceeds four, a lamp showing a white light must be carried both in front of and behind the animals. The lamps should be so screened that no light is thrown upwards and no appreciable illumination thrown on the ground.

Householders will be required to make arrangements so that no interior light will be visible from outside during darkness. Exterior lights such as porch lights will not be allowed.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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