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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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St Joseph's Youth Club volleyball team, Shantalla, who defeated St Augustine's in the final of the Old Galway for People Festival in St. Mary's College in November 1974. Seated (from left): Sindy Dowling, Alaco Sullivan, Fidelma Kavanagh (captain) and Ann Concannon. Standing: Mary Lally, Julie Sullivan, Mary Folan, Margaret Connolly, Mary Smith and Carmel Rigney.

1917

Race Week

The proposed ban of the Government upon racing was looked upon by the people of Galway with something approaching dismay.      In a resolution passed at The Galway Urban District Council some six weeks ago protesting against the stoppage of Galway Races, it was pointed out that the holding of this annual event meant, at least, the spending    of £10,000 in the City and its environs, and that the community would be so hard hit if  no races were allowed, that, considerable poverty would be bound to result.

To those who do not understand the conditions that obtain in a poor town like Galway, this seems in the nature of an exaggeration. The simple fact is, however, that the revenue reaped from visitors during Race Week provides the wherewithal to carry no inconsiderable section of our population over the winter. Fortunately, the universal protest that went up has prevailed, and Galway Races for 1917 will be held on Wednesday/Thursday, August 1/2.

As the Racing Calendar now falls out, it will be the last autumn event in Ireland this year, and also it will be the biggest. The entries closed on Wednesday last, and for the 12 events of the two days’ meeting they total 244.

Having regard to the fact that only half the bloodstock is being now maintained in training, this is a splendid record. When the entries for the Military Race, which it is proposed to run on the 1st day, are closed, it is expected that the total number of entries will be as large as in any previous year.

For the celebrated Galway Plate, 42 horses have been entered, so we may take it that this classic event will show a big field.

1942

Publicity for Galway

Frequent complaint has been made that tourist publicity for Galway leaves much to be desired. Certainly little or no effort has been made to stress this ancient city’s distinctive personality; its historical interest; its old world charm and picturesque vistas, its unique position as a holiday centre. Most of the publicity bestowed upon Galway, in fact, has had a beautiful vagueness which would have fitted equally well a hundred other places.

For this reason we welcome the appearance of the two articles from the Irish Tourist Association’s bright monthly, Irish Travel. True, Race Week has been “written up” repeatedly (though, perhaps, not with such verve and colour) but the aspect of the city with which the ‘Lady Visitor’ deals has remained virtually untouched. ‘The Glamour of Galway’, in other words, has not been capitalised as it should have been.

Haulage charges

Mr. George Lee, County Surveyor, told Mr. Sonny Cooke at a meeting of the Galway County Council’s Finance Committee that the Great Southern Railways Company were paid a higher rate than private lorry owners for the haulage of turf over roads. The private lorry owners were “suckers” to work for a lower price, Mr. Cooke said. He protested against the discrimination.

Contagious disease

Galway is as safe as possible from sea-borne disease of a contagious character. At the port, elaborate precautions are taken and the utmost vigilance is maintained to safeguard the citizens. These reassuring statements are the result of inquiries made by our representatives in consequence of somewhat disconcerting pronouncements made recently by medical authorities in other parts of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1922

Scabs warning

An exciting incident in connection with the postal strike occurred at Mary-st., Galway, at four o’clock last Saturday afternoon.

An official of the Galway Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., accompanied by another official, had gone to the central post office at Eglinton-street to collect the letters of the company. Shortly after he had left, it was alleged that he had taken other letters for delivery in Mary-street on his way back to the works.

The strike picket immediately gave chase, and an exciting scene, which was witnessed by a number of people in the street, followed.

The officials of the company were chased into the licensed premises of Mr. J. S. Young, but it could not be found that they had delivered any letters.

“We did not see them delivering any letters,” said one of the strikers. “Anyhow, an undertaking has been signed now not to attempt to deliver any to other people.”

A few national soldiers in uniform were standing at the Eglinton-street end of Mary-street during the incident. Four lady members of the staff at the Galway central office returned to work on Saturday and were understood to be engaged upon sorting of letters recently delivered by road.

It is stated that letters are also being posted at the central boxes. Meanwhile the picket remains almost continuously “on duty” outside the office, in front of which two boards have been place, one stating, “Don’t take letters from scabs”; and another “Restricted Services – Four do the work of forty-two”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Thatching one of the houses on Shantalla Road, just up from Cooke's Corner, in the 1970s.

1922

The third Dáil

The first meeting of the third Dáil held on Saturday morning last at Leinster House, Kildare-street, the premises of the Royal Dublin Society, recalled for a few minutes some of the stormy scenes at Westminster when Irish affairs were being discussed.

On Saturday, as then, Mr Laurence Ginnell was the central figure. He is apparently always cast for the role of obstructionist in politics, and on Saturday he made full use of his opportunity, with the result that, as at Westminster, he was carried form his seat by three stalwart attendants and expelled from the Assembly.

The Dáil met in the theatre of the house, a semi-circular room with seats rising tier upon tier from an open space in the centre. At the back of the last row of seats there is a promenade, and for some time before the Dáil was due to open, Mr. Ginnell, black band in hand and slouch, hat on head, marched round and round, speaking to no one, but apparently, like an arch conspirator, deep in thought.

Probably he felt lonely, for he was the only one of the anti-treaty members elected to the Dáil who put in an appearance. Miss MacSwiney and the rest, who were known to be in Dublin, have presumably decided to observe a policy of abstention.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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