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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The original statue of Pádraic Ó Conaire in Eyre Square in the 1980s prior to having its head removed by vandals in 1995. The repaired original is now in Galway Museum but a bronze replica is shortly to be installed at Eyre Square.

1917

No rear lamp

At Athenry Petty Sessions, James Ward, a chauffeur in the employment of Mr. Higgins, Athenry, was charged with driving a motor car at 11 o’clock at night without having a light to illuminate the identification mark at the rear. The defendant had no explanation to offer.

Chairman Mr. Joseph Kilbride, R.M., said it was a common practice among professional chauffeurs to let the tail light out at night so that they could not be identified. The District Inspector said it was a very necessary thing from the police point of view that the rear light be illuminated. The defendant was fined £1, the conviction to be endorse on the licence.

Bull on the loose

On Wednesday evening, consternation was felt among the female and juvenile population of the city when it became known that a bull had taken fright and was touring the streets of the city in an enraged fashion.

The animal, which was being driven quietly along, suddenly ran away in a determined fashion from his escort. He raced along the principal streets of the town and turned down in the direction of the docks, where he was brought under control by a number of dock labourers and farmers.

Killed by lightning

While working at his potato crop on Saturday afternoon, Thomas Naughton, Spiddal was struck by lightning and died in a short period. His head was badly burned and his hair completely singed. He was about to leave the field when he was killed. A married man with a family, he was aged about 35 years. Another man named Concannon was working in a boreen nearby when he was knocked down by a flash of lightning. In this district the lightning flashes were very vivid, and were of a bluish colour.

1942

Invisible planes warning

A few days ago an aeroplane flew over Galway. It was a clear day of sunshine, but, although thousands of people heard the plane, not one saw it – the machine was flying to high to be visible.

Possible the plane was one of our own, but, whatever its identity, the incident served to illustrate the vulnerability of this city to attack from the air. Military observers incline to the belief that the next few months will see the peak struggle of the war in Europe and this country’s danger will be greater than ever before.

In the circumstances, it behoves us to leave nothing undone that we can do to mitigate the peril of Galway. Our L.D.F. Battalion is a credit to the city – although we should have had enough volunteers for two battalions –

But it must be remembered that this is a purely combatant force and that there is a great deal of work for the safeguarding of the citizens and the protection of their property must be entrusted to other organisations.

Possibly it is because there is a good deal of misunderstanding among the general public as to its function that the L.S.F. has not been able to recruit one-fifth of the men necessary for the efficient working of the organisation. We feel sure that if the people understood the very valuable work which it has undertaken on their behalf, the necessary number would be forthcoming very quickly.

It is NOT a perfectly safe job. Should the city be attacked, the members of the L.S.F. will be exposed to far greater risks than the other non-combatants since the nature of their duties precludes them from taking shelter in the ordinary way. Whatever their own risks, however, it is their job to do everything in their power to minimise the casualties among the civilian population.

The danger is at our gates and drawing nearer with every day that passes. The L.S.F. wants those recruits NOW – today, not tomorrow!

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1922

Scabs warning

An exciting incident in connection with the postal strike occurred at Mary-st., Galway, at four o’clock last Saturday afternoon.

An official of the Galway Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., accompanied by another official, had gone to the central post office at Eglinton-street to collect the letters of the company. Shortly after he had left, it was alleged that he had taken other letters for delivery in Mary-street on his way back to the works.

The strike picket immediately gave chase, and an exciting scene, which was witnessed by a number of people in the street, followed.

The officials of the company were chased into the licensed premises of Mr. J. S. Young, but it could not be found that they had delivered any letters.

“We did not see them delivering any letters,” said one of the strikers. “Anyhow, an undertaking has been signed now not to attempt to deliver any to other people.”

A few national soldiers in uniform were standing at the Eglinton-street end of Mary-street during the incident. Four lady members of the staff at the Galway central office returned to work on Saturday and were understood to be engaged upon sorting of letters recently delivered by road.

It is stated that letters are also being posted at the central boxes. Meanwhile the picket remains almost continuously “on duty” outside the office, in front of which two boards have been place, one stating, “Don’t take letters from scabs”; and another “Restricted Services – Four do the work of forty-two”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Thatching one of the houses on Shantalla Road, just up from Cooke's Corner, in the 1970s.

1922

The third Dáil

The first meeting of the third Dáil held on Saturday morning last at Leinster House, Kildare-street, the premises of the Royal Dublin Society, recalled for a few minutes some of the stormy scenes at Westminster when Irish affairs were being discussed.

On Saturday, as then, Mr Laurence Ginnell was the central figure. He is apparently always cast for the role of obstructionist in politics, and on Saturday he made full use of his opportunity, with the result that, as at Westminster, he was carried form his seat by three stalwart attendants and expelled from the Assembly.

The Dáil met in the theatre of the house, a semi-circular room with seats rising tier upon tier from an open space in the centre. At the back of the last row of seats there is a promenade, and for some time before the Dáil was due to open, Mr. Ginnell, black band in hand and slouch, hat on head, marched round and round, speaking to no one, but apparently, like an arch conspirator, deep in thought.

Probably he felt lonely, for he was the only one of the anti-treaty members elected to the Dáil who put in an appearance. Miss MacSwiney and the rest, who were known to be in Dublin, have presumably decided to observe a policy of abstention.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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