Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City status downgraded to ‘moderately littered’ in survey

Published

on

Galway City Tribune – Galway City has lost its status as a ‘clean’ city in a survey of 40 towns and cities across Ireland.

The survey found that the Millennium Children’s Park behind Galway Cathedral was “completely destroyed by graffiti on every available surface”, while the river walk at Canal Road was also found to be heavily littered.

The city has now been branded ‘moderately littered’, along with Tralee, Carlow, Dublin City Centre, Navan and Mahon in Cork City in the latest study carried out by An Taisce on behalf of IBAL (Irish Business Against Litter) – it had only regained its litter-free status last September.

Ballybane – which was classed as a town for the purposes of the survey – was branded as ‘littered’ and came in at Number 38 in the league table. The Fana Glas estate was found to have “persistent litter”, while one side of St Brigid’s Church was subject to dumping.

The report found that Galway is lagging behind most other cities, having improved just three months earlier.

“It is disappointing to see this important tourist destination again slip to moderately littered having improved earlier in the year – it is lagging behind most other cities. The Courthouse and environs and Town Hall Theatre and environs were both much improved but still somewhat littered.

“The Millennium Children’s Playground was completely destroyed by graffiti on every available surface, including a piece of sculpture,” the report reads.

What the judges said:

N17 Approach: Grade B. This was generally a clean and welcoming approach to Galway City with built-up industrial and commercial estates on both sides of the road. It was somewhat littered closer to the city and this took away from an otherwise well-presented environment.

Bóthar na dTreabh: Grade A. (From Tuam Road junction to Kirwan roundabout). All appeared in good order along this route.  The planting was an attractive feature and the overall impression was of a clean and tidy environment.

University Hospital Galway: Grade A. The grounds of the hospital were in very good order – e.g. signage, planting, bins, low-lying shrubbery. The overall impression created here was a very positive one.

Carpark at UHG: Grade A. Overall, the carpark was presented well. The surface was in good condition and there was a virtual absence of litter.

NUIG: Grade A. The campus was in excellent order. Not only was there a complete absence of litter throughout the extensive area surveyed, but the whole area was exceptionally well-presented and maintained.  The mature grounds and buildings were in very good order. The litter bins were designed so that one side was for ‘general waste’ and the other was for recycling plastics, paper, cardboard and tin cans.

NUIG O’Donoghue Centre and Bridge: Grade A. The general environs of the building, including the bridge were in very good order, with a virtual absence of litter.

Eglinton Canal Walk: Grade C. This waterside environment was very much let down by heavy levels of alcohol-related litter. There was plenty of broken glass underfoot and cans had been stuck into the wall. Graffiti was also a feature at this site.

Millennium Children’s Park: Grade C. This city centre park has been destroyed by graffiti on every conceivable surface e.g. signage at entrance, Council visitor information notice board (which was devoid of any notices), litter bin, public toilets, skateboard park and even on the sculpture. There were some sweet papers. The grass/planted areas were in very good condition.

Galway Cathedral: Grade A. The Cathedral and area immediately surrounding it were spotless. The railings, paving, raised planted area, ramp signage etc. were all in excellent order. The carpark was in very good order, creating a positive impression throughout. It was clean, tidy and completely free of litter.

Courthouse: Grade B. There was a marked improvement and this time around it just missed getting the top litter grade. Some food related litter (fast-food wrappers, sweet papers, coffee cups and cans) and occasional cigarette-related litter took away from an otherwise very nicely presented environment – the building, paving, ornamental trees, railings etc. were all in excellent order.

Town Hall Theatre: Grade B. With a little extra care and attention this site could easily get the top litter grade. Cigarette-related litter was pronounced, along with plastic bottles and plastic bags.  The overall impression was quite a good one in terms of presentation.

St Nicholas Parochial School: Grade A. This school had the appearance of a lovingly-tended environment. Seats were brightly painted, spiral staircase was adorned with colourful bunting and hand and footprints decorated another wall surface.  Overall, it was a top-ranking site with a complete absence of litter throughout.

Waterside/Rowing Club: Grade C. The riverwalk along the banks adjacent to the club mooring was well cared for and almost entirely free of litter. However, there was a wide variety of litter in the water at a corner area – this area of water had limited flow, resulting in ‘trapped’ litter and scum/slime on the water’s surface.

Waterside (Woodquay): Grade A. The overall impression at this city centre residential area was a good one with well-tended gardens and a virtual absence of litter. There was a derelict site with overgrown weeds, but no major litter accumulations.

Waterside park: Grade A. A small city centre park with mature trees and well-maintained grass.  It was pretty clean with regard to litter but three benches within the park were completely broken.

Dyke Road Carpark: Grade C. The main surface area of the car park was in very good condition and clear of litter. It was the perimeter area, which was heavily-weeded and had trapped litter which brought down the litter grade. The majority of the litter was food-related. Signage relating to car park was in very good condition.

Recycle bank at Dyke Road: Grade B. The bins were mostly quite clean and presented well. It was the broken glass along the base of the bins and bottle tops/lids in the low-lying shrubbery which brought down the overall litter grade.

IMC Cinema: Grade B. The IMC building and environs were beginning to look tired with an unsightly black mould/fungus on one wall of the building. Much of the red paint on the railing had worn away and the black litter bin was very grubby. Chewing gum was pronounced, with lower levels of sweet papers and cigarette butts.

Galway Retail Park: Grade A. The colourful planting in this retail park was welcome in such a built-up environment. Many of the ‘older’ style of litter bins were in very poor condition, grubby and with the notices worn away. The newer bins were generally much fresher in appearance. Signage, paving, planted areas and general environment were in good order.

St. Brendan’s Avenue: Grade A. This street with a mix of terraced houses and apartments was generally in good order. The pavement on one side was subsiding. The road surface and markings and signage were in good order.

Eyre Square: Grade B. With a little extra care and attention this significant city centre site could easily get the top litter grade.  The litter was most pronounced at the steps. It was very well-presented and maintained.

Abbeygate Street, Lower: Grade A. This pedestrianised city centre shopping street presented very well with attractive paving and shop fronts.

Meanwhile, Ballybane had a very disappointing result in the survey, coming 38th out of 40 towns and cities (for the purposes of the survey, it was classed as a town).

Ballybane had two blackspots, after a great showing early in 2017.

The survey stated that most of its moderately littered sites could easily get the top litter grade with a little extra care and attention. These included areas such as East United Football Club, Ballybane Road, GMIT and Ballybane Shopping Centre.

However, the Fána Glas housing estate was a blackspot, as was the area around St Brigid’s Church.

East United Football Club earned a Grade B and just missed the top grade. The club building, forecourt and enclosed play area were excellent. Food-related litter and plywood sheeting took away from an otherwise very well-maintained environment.

Glenavon Drive, a residential area consisting of six semi-detached houses, received a Grade A. It was in very good order with a virtual absence of litter.

Castlepark, Numbers 1-16 and 278-339, received a Grade C.  The estate was mixed with regard to litter, according to the survey. Houses 1-16 were almost litter free. The higher house numbers in one were in much better condition, while the mid- to lower-house numbers had considerable litter.

St Brigid’s Church was deemed Grade D. It was mostly clean and well-maintained. However, bags of rubbish were strewn about an area which is highly visible to anybody using the car-park.

Fána Glas also received a Grade D. Horse dung, old clothes, plastic wrapping and carpets were present, as was graffiti. Some houses were well cared for but many were not. A boarded-up house had site-security notices.

Illegal dumping in Fana Glas.

Rocklands Avenue, a moderately littered residential area which had food-related litter and plastic wrapping, got a Grade B.

Ballybane Shopping Centre got a Grade B, and the survey stated that with a little extra attention it could get the top grade.  Chewing gum was an issue, as were graffiti and moss and grubby litter bins.  The high number of closed and vacant outlets create a ‘shuttered’ environment.

The recycle facility at Ballybane Shopping Centre was in excellent order and got an A grade for clean bins and a total absence of litter.

Ballybane Road got Grade B. One area near the shopping centre was littered with coffee cups, plastic bottles, fast-food wrappers and sweet papers.

GMIT also got Grade B.  Its overall presentation was excellent, but some food-related litter was found in the shrubbery at the road front – otherwise, it would have been a top site.

CITY TRIBUNE

City Council’s contempt for the public it serves

Published

on

A City Council picture showing an aerial view of work on the new pedestrian bridge. The local authority has not covered itself in glory when it comes to informing the public about road closures to facilitate the project.

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column by Dara Bradley

Galway City Council appears to just do what it wants when it wants.

Last Friday, it officially closed a road at Newtownsmyth. It will be closed until October 28.

The closure, which was to commence last Friday, September 23, was to facilitate construction works on the new bridge at Salmon Weir for pedestrians and cycling.

It is essential work and the closure is necessary for health and safety purposes.

The City Council, as is only right and proper, advertised the closure in advance, online and in a free-sheet newspaper. So far, so good.

Except, as anyone who knows Newtownsmyth is aware, that road has been closed for weeks and even months prior to the September 23 official closure start date.

Trying to find the City Council’s closure order, and public notice, for closing the road at Newtownsmyth prior to September 23 has proved as difficult as sourcing the Third secret of Fatima.

Requests to City Hall’s communications department to confirm whether the Council had a legitimate closure order prior to September 23 have not shone any light on the subject.

And so, in the absence of an adequate response, is it reasonable to conclude that the Council did not have permission to close Newtownsmyth prior to September 23?

And if that’s the case, can the Council now just go around closing roads willy-nilly, without notice and without allowing input from residents and users of the road?

Maybe it was a mistake. If it was, why not say so? The Galway public is forgiving. Maybe they had gone through proper procedure, but why not just show us the notice if that’s the case?

For too long now, though, City Councillors have been treated with contempt by the unelected executive at City Hall and the suspicion is this closure without notice was just another manifestation of that contempt spreading to the public too.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

City sides will fancy chances of advancing as champions face Corofin

Published

on

Bearna's James Kennedy hits the deck in Ballinasloe on Tuesday as Annaghdown's Frankie Burke and Darragh Meehan try to chase down possession. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

The battle for this year’s county Senior Gaelic football club title looks to be wide open after the quarter-final draw was made this week following the delayed conclusion of the group stages on Tuesday night.

Salthill/Knocknacarra, who finished second in group 2, have been handed a last eight tie with a Tuam Stars side that finished third in group 1; while St Michael’s, who topped Group 3, will face an Annaghdown side that nabbed the final quarter-final spot in dramatic fashion on Tuesday night.

They went into their game with Bearna knowing they needed to win by a minimum of 12points to pip Milltown to the final qualifying spot as the second best of the teams that finished third in the group stages.

They looked to be coming up just short until they were awarded a late free, which goalkeeper James Healy converted, to snatch that remaining quarter-final slot on socring difference form Milltown.

The 2020 champions, Moycullen, will take on Claregalway in the last eight; while the pick of the ties is undoubtedly the clash of defending champions, Mountbellew/Moylough, with a Corofin side that was denied the five-in-a-row by Moycullen two years ago.

At the other end of the equation, St James’ are in a relegation battle, and face a clash with An Spidéal in the preliminary play-offs. A win will secure their senior status for another year, but a defeat will see them join Oughterard, An Cheathru Rua, and the losers of the other preliminary play-off between Caherlistrane and Monivea/Abbey in a round robin league, with the bottom two sides in those play-offs dropping to the intermediate ranks next year.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Play-offs dress rehearsal facing Utd against Treaty

Published

on

Former Galway United player Enda Curran celebrates his recent hat-trick for Treaty United in their FAI Cup quarter-final win over UCD. The in-form Mervue native will be facing the Tribesmen in a First Division clash on Friday.

GALWAY United head to Limerick this Friday evening for what is looking like a dress rehearsal for the end-of-season play-offs as they take on Treaty United in the Markets Field (7.45pm).

This is United’s game-in-hand over league leaders, Cork City, and a win will see them close the gap on the Leesiders to four points with three games remaining, and while a win would give the slightest of hopes of a late challenge for league honours, it is more likely to serve as a further boost to confidence ahead of the protracted play-off series that kicks-off at the end of next month.

United need to win their final four games to have any hope of snatching the title, and given the goal difference between the sides, they also need to hope that City don’t pick up more than four points from their last three games, if they are to finish top of the pile.

United’s last three games after this weekend are at home to Athlone, away to Wexford, and home to Longford Town; while City are home to Wexford, away to Athlone, and home to Bray, the easier of the two run-ins, so for United it is all about building momentum ahead of the play-offs.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending