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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway 2020 could drive you to drink but not Galway Gold!

Dara Bradley

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Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column

Back in June 2017, Galwegians were still ‘tipsy’ at Galway having been designated as the European Capital of Culture in 2020, just 12 months previously.
The mood was invigorating – intoxicating, almost – as Galway continued to celebrate the culture equivalent of hosting the Olympic Games.
Diageo, the makers of Guinness, in conjunction with 45 city pubs, even launched a new beer onto the local market.
Galway Gold was unleashed on thirsty locals to “celebrate the city’s successful bid to become European Capital of Culture for 2020”. Some €10 from each keg sold was to be donated to Galway 2020.
Since the launch of the new beer, the problems with Galway 2020 are well documented. They vary from issues with artists’ Intellectual Property, fundraising shortfalls, concerns over a lack of connectivity with local communities, secrecy and lack of engagement with artists, and serious staffing issues.
They could drive you to drink. Just not Galway Gold. Not any more, anyway, because Diageo has confirmed that Galway Gold has now been removed from the market. The beer itself wasn’t particularly tasty, or popular.
A bit like the Galway 2020 project itself, all that glistens is not gold. But all is not lost either.
“Working with our customers in Galway, we have decided to replace Galway Gold as of July,” confirmed a Diageo spokesperson.
“We are replacing it with Citra IPA and using this to support the 2020 venture from now on. We are attending a meeting led by the 2020 committee with all publicans in Galway next week.
“At it, we will confirm our continuing support and present plans for the next reiteration of the fundraising plan. The move was made to keep the idea fresh and relevant and to maximise the opportunity for Galway 2020 to collect funds and support the initiative.”
With a gaping hole in the budget, Galway 2020 will be mightily relieved by Diageo’s ongoing commitment and support. Now if they could just get commitments from ‘funders’ Galway County Council, Northern and Western Regional Assembly and Western Development Commission, they’ll be sucking diesel.

Board of Galway 2020 should be watchdogs
A little update on the ‘Who knew what?’ saga in relation to the premature departure of Galway 2020 Creative Director, Chris Baldwin.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Footfall down by 80% in Galway city centre

Stephen Corrigan

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Shop Street on Ladies Day of the Galway Races

From this week’s Galway City Tribune – Footfall in the city centre was down by about 80% during what would normally be a bumper three weeks in the city, with this year’s Arts Festival and Summer Racing Festival both falling foul of Covid-19 restrictions.

Data compiled by the Galway City Business Association (GCBA) – which is a measure of mobile phone users at various points in the city centre – shows that there were over half a million fewer movements recorded during Race Week this year, representing around a 77% decline on the same week in 2019.

While the figures are by no means a conclusive count of individuals in the city, they do provide a good guide as to how many people are traversing the main thoroughfares over an extended period.

During the second week of the Arts Festival in 2019, just short of 900,000 movements were recorded in what was the city’s single busiest seven days of the year.

However, with the absence of the Big Top and various other Arts Festival venues this year, just over 150,000 movements were recorded in the same week this year.

Well-known city businessman and GCBA member Anthony Ryan said that the situation was gradually improving, but it was obviously a very different Race Week this year.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read it in full, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council orders removal of new footbridge

Stephen Corrigan

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – The installation of a footbridge over the Middle River at Newtownsmyth has led Galway City Council to warn the adjacent property owner to remove the structure, or face legal proceedings.

Property developer John Curley, who owns the commercial unit involved at Abhainn na mBradán, has received instruction from City Hall to have the bridge removed by today (Friday) in what the Galway City Tribune understands is being treated as a ‘extremely serious breach’ of planning regulations.

Mr Curley told this newspaper that the €25,000 bridge could not be removed this week as his architect was on holidays, and he was still considering what to do about the Council’s order.

Mr Curley said businessman Eric Furey had opened a new café in the building two weeks ago – the building also houses Born Clothing and Papa Rich restaurant.

The bridge had been installed to coincide with the opening of Roots Café and both Mr Curley and Mr Furey argued that it was crucial to the business’ survival that there was access from the busy canal walkway.

“We are going to fight this,” said Mr Curley, adding that it had been their intention to seek retention for the bridge, but that had been ruled out by city planners who refused to give permission to utilise public land on the far side of the canal.

A spokesperson for Galway City Council said: “Immediately on becoming aware of the installation of this structure across the canal, Galway City Council Planning Department requested the immediate removal of the structure.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read it in full, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Anger over illegal parking of camper vans in Salthill

Enda Cunningham

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Camper vans illegally parked on Rockbarton Road this week.

From this week’s Galway City Tribune – Galway City Council has admitted that it is difficult to enforce bylaws banning the parking of caravans and camper vans on roads in Salthill.

It follows complaints from elected representatives and local residents again this Summer in relation to illegal dumping and ‘unsightly’ parking on the Promenade and alongside Leisureland.

Under the Council’s own Parking Control Bylaws 2009, parking of ‘temporary dwellings’ (which includes caravans, mobile homes, tents and any structure whether on wheels or not) is prohibited on the Prom; Quincentennial Drive (behind Toft Carpark); Rockbarton Road (adjacent to Leisureland) and on the Western Distributor Road. Council carparks are also off limits.

Local area councillor Donal Lyons said the problem seemed to be worse this year, which he believed is due to holidaying staycationers.

Councillor Peter Keane said that it is a ‘small few’ people that are giving caravaners a bad name.

“We welcome holidaymakers, but let them go into the caravan parks where proper services are provided, such as electricity and water.”

A spokesperson for Galway City Council said that the local authority’s experience was that it has proved difficult to enforce the parking ban over the years.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read it in full, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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