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Fusion of classical and club music at Electric Garden

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Salome Kammer, who will perform at Electric when Music for Galway goes clubbing next Friday, April 8.

Following last year’s success at Druid’s Mick Lally Theatre where the world of classical music crashed the club scene, Music for Galway plan to ‘go bigger and bolder’ this year.

They are bringing the Vogler Quartet with soprano Salome Kammer to Galway City’s Electric Garden and Theatre, followed by guest DJs John Daly, New Jackson and Quarion on Friday next, April 8.

Music for Galway has joined forces with Electric to bring classical music into the realm of the club, in a format similar to that of Berlin’s renowned Yellow Lounge. The Vogler Quartet will perform string quartets by Haydn before joining forces with Salome Kammer for a selection of Kurt Weill songs. These have been arranged especially for her and the Quartet by Steffen Schleiermacher and will include hits like Mac the Knife and the Alabama Song (notably covered by The Doors)

DJ John Daly will make his main-floor debut at Electric, playing techno, disco, house and ambient music.  Also on bill are the impeccable New Jackson, a project spearheaded by songwriter David Kitt. Completing the line-up is Berlin-based,Swiss-born Quarion who has produced and played with a variety of musicians since the late 1990s. His DJ sets also incorporate semi-improvised live performances.

This is a club night out with a difference, a happy mish-mash of classical and club music.

■ Tickets €20 / €16 concessions and MFG Friends / €10 full-time students. Doors 8pm.

CITY TRIBUNE

Composer Marian Ingoldsby in spotlight at Black Gate concert

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Composer Marian Ingoldsby.

Celebrated Tipperary composer Marian Ingoldsby will be the focus of the next concert in the Music and Musings series run by the Galway Music Residency.  This will take place in the city’s Black Gate Cultural Centre next Thursday, November 14, when the ConTempo quartet will perform her work, Struck by a Raindrop, which was premiered in 1999 by the Chicago-based Jupiter String Quartet.

Marian’s piece will be complemented by additional works, with ConTempo performing excerpts from Britten’s String Quartet no. 3.

In between, there will be a discussion between Marian, the musicians and the audience, moderated by NUIG’s Internal Communications Officer John Caulfield – with questions from the audience being particularly welcome.

Marian Ingoldsby studied at UCC under the renowned composer Gerald Barry, graduating with an MA in Composition. In 1995, UCC presented her with the Fleischmann Prize, an annual award to music graduates from that university for their contribution to music in Ireland.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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CITY TRIBUNE

Gatehouse mark new album with Ballinasloe concert

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Gatehouse: Jacinta McEvoy, John McEvoy, John Wynne and Rachel Garvey.

Roscommon group Gatehouse, who have just released their second album, Heather down the Moor, will perform in the Pillar House, Ballinasloe, next Friday November 15, as part of a national tour.

The group take their name from the Tiara Gate Lodge, situated at the entrance to the Rockingham Estate near Boyle and draw their inspiration from the rich history and landscape of Lough Key Forest Park.

Although they are a relatively new group, having released their debut, Tús Nua, in 2016, the four members of Gatehouse are highly experienced musicians.  They are singer Rachel Garvey, Jacinta McEvoy on guitar and concertina, John McEvoy on fiddle and mandolin and John Wynne on flutes and whistles.

The two Johns go back a long way and with Jacinta performed as a trio for many years.  Three became four when Rachel Garvey, one of the finest interpreters of traditional songs, accepted an invitation to join them. Gatehouse was born.  Although their focus initially was on the music of North Connacht, Gatehouse are constantly expanding their repertoire with new songs and compositions, along with a sprinkling of other influences.

Since the release of the highly acclaimed Tús Nua, the band has gone from strength to strength, performing at venues and festivals in Ireland, Denmark, Norway and the UK, and on television.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Connacht Tribune

Shampain bubbles over with dance floor success!

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Inverin native Cóilí Collins

Groove Tube with Cian O’Connell

Under the moniker of Shampain, Inverin native Cóilí Collins is one of the most exciting DJs currently performing on the Irish scene. The 22 year old’s presence has grown exponentially over the course of the last couple of years and as he continues to invigorate venues and storm slots at major festivals, his stock continues to rise.

Alongside filling dancefloors with his own sets, Cóilí has been a major proponent of Galway dance music through his writing for the likes of Mixmag and Four Four Magazine as well as his promotional work with VSN – a collective he co-founded alongside close friend Evan Campbell (Kettama) which has been responsible for bringing a number of high-profile, international DJs to the West of Ireland.

Cóilí’s work ethic and passion for music can’t be disputed and yet for some people there remains an air of inaccessibility about the songs he plays.

“The main reason it seems inaccessible is because it’s done on machines,” Cóilí argues.

“There are no words usually and if there are words they’re really repetitive. The accessibility of dance music is more so in the experience.

“You could hear a Dax J tune on Spotify and it could literally sound like a drum to you for five minutes – but then you could go out to a club where the DJs have really good speakers and you’re there with all of your friends and you hear [the same song] and you might be like ‘OK, now I kind of get it’.”

Dance music has been around for a long time but it still encounters prejudices that don’t exist in much of music.

Cóilí points to skewed assumptions of fans of the genre that fail to represent the music or the people playing it.

“It definitely has a negative connotation that a lot of other genres don’t have,” he insists.

“It’s the same for heavy metal I think. People think that [heavy metal fans] are assholes, the music is aggressive and everyone is really drunk and on drugs…I’ve actually ended up at a couple of metal gigs.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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