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CITY TRIBUNE

Fr Griffin’s/Éire Óg revive memories of former glories with final win over Pearses

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Fr Griffin's/Éire Óg's Darren Moylan comes under pressure from Gary Lally of Padraig Pearses during the County Junior A football final at Duggan Park last Friday. Photos: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

Fr Griffin’s/Éire Óg 3-8

Padraig Pearses 1-8

SEVENTY years on from their formation and lifting of the senior crown at their first attempt, Fr Griffin’s/Éire Óg returned to the limelight last Friday night as they overcame a determined Padraig Pearses outfit to be crowned Junior A football champions.

Surrounded by senior clubs in both football and hurling, the city side may have been long forgotten by many younger followers of Galway GAA, yet on a cold night in Ballinasloe the club relived the glory days with a county title cherished by young and old members alike.

During a passionate speech after lifting the trophy, Adrian MacPhiblin spoke about how close his club had come to folding before an amalgamation just a few years ago, but with three goals and an impressive tally of 3-7 from play, the fifth most successful side in Galway football history continue to move closer to a return to the big time.

From the off, both sides showcased a will to give the crowd a good attacking game, an ability to field around the middle and run at defences being key to success on a perfect evening for football.

It was John Moylan’s city side that opened the scoring after just two minutes as Stephen Killeen bolted through the middle and pointed from close range, while two interceptions from Pearses’ kick outs resulted in Paul Healy tapping over twice to give his side an early advantage.

The East Galway outfit, who have had a football wing to their club at adult level since 2013, were looking to make it back to back promotions following their Junior B triumph over Oughterard last year, and they too had success through solo runs when securing the ball in midfield as Enda Cunniffe did when getting the game’s first goal chance only to miss the target from close range.

In the opening 10 minutes, it was Stephen Killeen who was causing Pearses the most trouble, constantly using his power and pace to create chances for his side. However, the Liam Mellows hurler would be black carded in what was the first of three blacks and one red shown in a hotly contested county final.

James Clancy’s troops would finally get themselves on the board through a Tom Flannery free on 11 minutes, while soon after Kerrill Hardiman pointed following an impressive team move from one end of the pitch to the other leaving just a single point between the sides by the end of the first quarter.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Motorcyclist killed in Galway crash

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A motorcyclist has died following a crash in Renmore this morning.

Shortly after 10am, the motorcyclist – aged in his 40s – was seriously injured when his motorbike collided with a car on the R338 Old Dublin Road at Renmore Park. The motorcyclist was pronounced dead at the scene a short time later.

The crash site was fully examined by Garda Forensic Collision Investigators and the road has now reopened to traffic.

The deceased was removed to the mortuary at University Hospital Galway and the Coroner has been notified.

Investigating Gardaí are appealing witnesses to come forward and have asked anyone who was travelling in the area at the time and has dashcam footage to contact them.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Wrecking ball for once-great social hub, the Corrib Great Southern Hotel

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – It was the summer of ’69, and the landmark Great Southern Hotel in Eyre Square was booming.

Every evening, 180 guests – mostly American tourists – thronged its dining room for dinner. Similar numbers were served breakfast, with about 150 for lunch.

It was so busy, the semi-state company planned another 160-bedroom sister hotel, the Corrib Great Southern, on the Dublin Road.

Then the Troubles in Northern Ireland started, and “business fell off a cliff”, recalled Richard Lyons, who worked in both hotels, including 35 years as maître d in the newer one.

“They were building the Corrib when the Troubles started and they decided they had to cut back the rooms by 40. That’s how they finished with 120 bedrooms,” he said.

The hotel was opened on May 27, 1971, by Brian Lenihan Snr, the then Minister for Transport and Power, and Bishop of Galway, Michael Browne.

But the legacy of the Troubles lingered for years after, according to Renmore resident Richard – debt from State borrowing to build a new hotel up North, which was twice bombed by the IRA, threatened the very existence of the semi-state hotel group owned by CIÉ.

In the early 1980s, hotel group debt grew to nearly £8 million, and the Fine Gael and Labour Coalition Government headed by Garret Fitzgerald decided to liquidate it.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story of the hotel, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council extends outdoor dining into October

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – The summer of alfresco dining looks set to be extended into the late autumn, with Galway City Council confirming this week their plans to extend the outdoor arrangements to October 22.

Local councillors, hospitality representatives and the City Council have said this week that the extension of outdoor dining at five city locations from September 30 to October 22 next, reflects public satisfaction with the current set-up.

This week the City Council published statutory public notices to clear the way for a continuation of the existing road closures required to facilitate outdoor dining on William Street West, Raven Terrace, Dominick Street Upper, Woodquay and the Small Crane.

Johnny Duggan, Chairman of the city branch of the Vintners’ Federation of Ireland and proprietor of Taylor’s Bar on Dominick Street, told the Galway City Tribune that the outdoor dining initiative during the summer had been a ‘huge success’ both from a viability and operational viewpoint.

“It has brought a life and vibrancy back into these areas in a very safe and controlled environment – the move makes sense in terms of the October 22 deadline set for the return of normal business,” he said.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story and for a proposal to bring an ice rink back to Leisureland, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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