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CITY TRIBUNE

Fr Griffin’s/Éire Óg revive memories of former glories with final win over Pearses

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Fr Griffin's/Éire Óg's Darren Moylan comes under pressure from Gary Lally of Padraig Pearses during the County Junior A football final at Duggan Park last Friday. Photos: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

Fr Griffin’s/Éire Óg 3-8

Padraig Pearses 1-8

SEVENTY years on from their formation and lifting of the senior crown at their first attempt, Fr Griffin’s/Éire Óg returned to the limelight last Friday night as they overcame a determined Padraig Pearses outfit to be crowned Junior A football champions.

Surrounded by senior clubs in both football and hurling, the city side may have been long forgotten by many younger followers of Galway GAA, yet on a cold night in Ballinasloe the club relived the glory days with a county title cherished by young and old members alike.

During a passionate speech after lifting the trophy, Adrian MacPhiblin spoke about how close his club had come to folding before an amalgamation just a few years ago, but with three goals and an impressive tally of 3-7 from play, the fifth most successful side in Galway football history continue to move closer to a return to the big time.

From the off, both sides showcased a will to give the crowd a good attacking game, an ability to field around the middle and run at defences being key to success on a perfect evening for football.

It was John Moylan’s city side that opened the scoring after just two minutes as Stephen Killeen bolted through the middle and pointed from close range, while two interceptions from Pearses’ kick outs resulted in Paul Healy tapping over twice to give his side an early advantage.

The East Galway outfit, who have had a football wing to their club at adult level since 2013, were looking to make it back to back promotions following their Junior B triumph over Oughterard last year, and they too had success through solo runs when securing the ball in midfield as Enda Cunniffe did when getting the game’s first goal chance only to miss the target from close range.

In the opening 10 minutes, it was Stephen Killeen who was causing Pearses the most trouble, constantly using his power and pace to create chances for his side. However, the Liam Mellows hurler would be black carded in what was the first of three blacks and one red shown in a hotly contested county final.

James Clancy’s troops would finally get themselves on the board through a Tom Flannery free on 11 minutes, while soon after Kerrill Hardiman pointed following an impressive team move from one end of the pitch to the other leaving just a single point between the sides by the end of the first quarter.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

€46,000 Lotto winner comes forward as deadline looms

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Galway Bay fm newsroom – The Knocknacarra winner of the Lotto Match 5 + Bonus from the 12th of December has come forward to claim their prize, just two weeks before the claim deadline.

The winning ticket, which is worth €46,234, was sold at Clybaun Stores on the Clybaun Road on the day of the draw, one of two winners of the Lotto Match 5 + Bonus prize of €92,000.

A spokesperson for the National Lottery say we are now making arrangements for the lucky winner to make their claim in the coming days.

Meanwhile, the Lotto jackpot for tomorrow night (27th February) will roll to an estimated €5.5 million.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Voice of ‘Big O’ reflects on four decades

Denise McNamara

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – The daytime voice of Big O Taxis is celebrating four decades in the role – and she has no plans to hang up her headset any time soon.

Roisin Freeney decided to seek a job after staying at home to mind her three children for over a decade. It was 1981 when she saw an advert in the Connacht Sentinel for a dispatch operator.

The native of Derry recalls that the queue for the job wound its way past Monroe’s Tavern from the taxi office on Dominick Street.

“There was a great shortage of work back then. I nearly had a heart attack when I saw the line of people. My then husband who was giving me a lift in never thought I’d get the job, he was driving on past and I said, let me off.

“I got it because I worked as a telephonist in the telephone exchange in Derry. But I was terrified starting off because I hadn’t been in the work system for so long.”

Back then Big O Taxis had only 25 drivers and just a single line for the public to book a cab.

“We had an old two-way radio, you had to speak to the driver and everybody could listen in. It was easy to leave the button pressed when it shouldn’t be pressed. People heard things they shouldn’t have – that’s for sure,” laughs Roisin.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of Róisín’s story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Baby boom puts strain on Galway City secondary schools

Stephen Corrigan

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – A baby boom in the late 2000s has left parents of sixth class pupils in Galway City scrambling to find a secondary school place for their children next September – with over 100 children currently facing the prospect of rejection from city schools.

The Department of Education is now rushing to address the issue and confirmed to the Galway City Tribune this week that it was fully aware of increasing pressure and demand on city schools

Local councillor Martina O’Connor said there were 100 more children more than there were secondary school places for next year, and warned that this would put severe pressure on schools to increase their intake numbers.

“This will put a lot of pressure on schools because they will have been working out the number of teachers and what resources they would need in October or November last year and they could be facing a situation where they will be asked to take an additional eight or 10 students.

“There would normally be a small excess – maybe two or three – but this year, it’s over 100. There is a bigger number of children in sixth class this year and there will be the same issue for the next few years,” said the Green Party councillor.

A Department spokesperson said while there were capacity issues, factors other than numbers could be at play, adding that there were approximately 1,245 children in the city due to move onto secondary school in September.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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