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Exhibitions showcasing wide variety of creative talent

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A host of exhibitions currently being held around the city and county are designed to appeal to the Christmas shopper who is looking to buy something a little bit different and long-lasting.

 First up is a show from John Herrick, the talented footballer who was capped for Ireland in the 1970s – which was highly unusual for a player based in this country. The Corkman, who came to Galway in 1979 as player-manager with Galway Rovers, later earned a reputation as a quality sign writer, whose work was seen on many shop fronts around the City.

Not surprisingly, he is also an accomplished artist, whose work can currently be seen in Galway City at Le Petit Rouge, 33 Dominick Street.

The exhibition is an eclectic mix of oil painting, watercolours and drawings in which he captures Galway scenes ranging from a lone, early-morning bather at Blackrock to the colours of caravans in Connemara.

Connacht Tribune

Bowing out after 31 years’ service

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James Harrold with the owner of Claregalway Castle, Eamonn O'Donoghue, (left) in July 2019 when he officially launched the bilingual publication, The Claregalway Castle Project which celebrated the history and restoration of the castle.

James C Harrold has played a key role in Galway’s artistic life for more than three decades. The retiring City Arts officer reflects on his years working in the county and city, and shares memories of artists, events and places, while also looking to the future.

 

Since 1990 I have been working with the artists, arts organisations, communities and neighbourhoods of Galway; for ten years as City and County Arts Officer, and subsequently specifically in the city. I had returned to Galway from Wexford Arts Centre where I had been Artistic Director, but before that I had spent a lot of time in the West. Every childhood summer was enjoyed in Barna, I went to college here, to UCG, and had worked with Galway Arts Festival, the Arts Centre and Macnas.

My romantic and adoring view of Galway originated in early-years visits to Kennys’ with my bibliophile father, or to Charles Lamb’s studio in Carraroe, or to my mother’s family in musical Belclare at the foot of Knockma.

‘Galway is a paradise,’ I stated firmly in a newspaper profile to mark my appointment.

I was one of the first of the new Local Authority Arts Officers, co-funded by the Arts Council with a brief to develop local arts.

Based in possibly Ireland’s oldest prefab at the back of the County Buildings in Prospect Hill, a handy base to explore from, create and curate projects, networks and funding opportunities, I was tasked to advise and assist the city and county in policy, programming and grant aid. My dear friend and college colleague Michael Diskin had returned to Galway on the same day, February 19th.

For the next 22 years, with Mike from 1994 ensconced in the Town Hall Theatre we met two or three times a week. Back in the ‘80s we had been inspired by Ollie Jennings and Páraic Breathnach, who had laid the foundations for so much of Galway’s creative reputation. We were following in their mighty footsteps and developing our own pathways too.

Early forays into the county involved bringing Little John Nee to the towns and villages every weekend that summer. His children’s shows, mainly open-air in the little market squares of east and north Galway opened conversations that are continuing still.

Read the full story in this week’s Connacht Tribune, on sale in shops now – or download the digital edition from www.connachttribune.ie

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Connacht Tribune

Eileen set to soar in Seagull

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Eileen Walsh.

When Cork-born actress Eileen Walsh got a phone call from Druid’s Artistic Director Garry Hynes a few months ago, asking her to take part in the company’s next production – Thomas Kilroy’s version of Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull – Eileen didn’t hesitate.

“I knew it would be outdoors and Druid have a history of doing huge projects outdoors, successfully. So, I knew it would happen even if Covid went mad again,” she says. Eileen, who lives in London, had already seen a couple of projects fall by the wayside because of the pandemic, but this would be different, she knew.

She had another reason for accepting too – it would mean reuniting onstage with Marty Rea and Marie Mullen, performers for whom she has huge regard. Eileen previously worked with them on other Druid projects, including 2012’s acclaimed DruidMurphy, featuring three plays by Tuam writer, Tom Murphy. More recently, in 2019, she and Marty received rave reviews for their performances in Beginnings, a contemporary play about dating, at the Gate Theatre.

“Working with Marty is always a joy and working with Marie is also a draw,” Eileen says as she gets ready for the first ‘tech’ (technical rehearsal) in Coole Park outside Gort, where The Seagull is being staged, under strict adherence to Covid-19 guidelines.

“Yesterday, upstairs in the rehearsal space in Druid Theatre, we had a moment,” she adds with a laugh. “We were all in one room doing our lines together and the specialness of all – being double-vaxxed and working – wasn’t lost on us.”

Thomas Kilroy’s version of Chekhov’s tragicomedy premiered in London’s Royal Court Theatre in 1981. It’s set in a large country house in the West of Ireland at the time of the Irish literary Renaissance – which was when Chekhov had written the original. The Seagull is a play about family, love, theatricality and jealousy, set in a world where the Anglo-Irish ascendancy presided over the Irish peasantry. But, echoing the original, this was a world on the cusp of change.

Eileen plays Isobel Desmond, with Jack Gleeson (Game of Thrones) as her son Constantine,  both of whom are back from London to spend summer at this house – their ancestral home.

Read the full interview in this week’s Connacht Tribune, on sale in shops now – or download the digital edition from www.connachttribune.ie

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Connacht Tribune

Galway poet’s new chapter as debut novel hits the shops

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Elaine Feeney....debut novel.

“I hated school so much I thought if I could be a teacher, I could make it a bit better,” says novelist and poet Elaine Feeney about her day-job as an English and History teacher at St Jarlath’s College in Tuam.

The Athenry woman certainly has made it livelier and more relevant. Her students who were studying Hamlet for this year’s Leaving Cert departed from the text to give the troubled prince psychotherapy sessions, with different boys taking on the roles of Hamlet and the therapist as they explored the plot. Elaine laughs as she recalls how they got totally caught up in it. There’s always an entry point to good writing, she says, adding that she loves Shakespeare – in part because of the soap opera element to his drama.

“You can compare it to the latest episode of EastEnders”.

The Handmaid’s Tale by contemporary Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood is also on the curriculum. Her novel might seem more relevant to the boys, especially given its global success since being adapted for television. When Elaine learned that Atwood would be visiting Galway in early March this year for a Galway 2020 event, she asked the organisers if it would be possible for the class to meet her and discuss her work. That’s what happened and 25 young men in their school blazers spent three hours discussing the novel with Atwood.

Elaine lectures in Creative Writing at NUIG and has been involved in the university’s project archiving the stories of the survivors of Tuam’s Mother and Baby home. So, watching her students engage with a woman whose books deal with the misuse of power and oppression of women was a great moment.

It’s an example of how far she’ll go to give the students the best preparation for exams and for life. Elaine has a great relationship with them, something she’ll miss next year as she takes a career break to promote her own novel, As You Were, published by UK company Harvill Secker.

Read the full interview with Elaine Feeney in this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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