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End of the slurry pong?

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Seamus Doyle's self propelled slurry tanker that injects the slurry directly into the ground, eliminating any nitrogen loss and also the pungent odour of the waste liquid. Photo: Hany Marzouk

IT probably will be the way of the future for all farmers . . . the direct injection of slurry into the soil, eliminating the possible loss of nitrogen to the atmosphere and also getting rid of that awful pong from the waste liquid.

Agri-contractor Seamus Doyle from Bullaun near Loughrea, decided to splash out his cash to avoid the ‘splash outs’ from the traditional plate spread of slurry directly onto the grass.

Seamus told the Farming Tribune that he imported directly from Holland in 2010 his 380 horsepower Vervaet with a 40kph box. It not did not come cheap, costing a cool €256,000 at the time – it is the only one of its type in the Republic of Ireland.

Since then though the machine has made a very solid effort at paying its way with a pretty flat-out demand from January through to October as farmers see the benefits of direct injection.

The direct injection system has a lot of very obvious advantages that farmers are now seeing at first hand, according to Seamus Doyle.

“The big advantage in terms of nutrient usage, is that it eliminates the loss of nitrogen into the atmosphere, one of the major problems with spreading directly onto the grass.

“Secondly the slits into the ground and the gaps in between allows the worm to survive, also a very important aspect of soil fertility, while a third advantage is that the land can often be grazed four to five days after the slurry has been injected into the soil.

“From an environmental point of view, one of the most noticeable advantages is that the smell from the slurry is eliminated as it goes straight into the soil and under the grass surface,” Seamus Doyle said this week.

After that, it’s all down to economics and Seamus Doyle points out that the direct injection system cost to the farmer is quite reasonable given the purchase price of the machine.

His tanker takes 3,100 gallons with a charge of €45 per load to farmers that compares quite solidly with a charge of about €30 per load for the conventional splash plate spreading system with a 2,600 gallon load.

The slurry can be injected into the ground at depths of between two and four inches and at whatever rate the farmer wants and the slits also help to aerate the ground.

“I think that the price to the farmer is very, very competitive given the advantages of the system – we have to price it that way to get the business, but the return for the farmer is really good we believe,” said Seamus Doyle.

Connacht Tribune

Factory prices must reflect market

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Galway IFA Livestock Rep, Micheál Haverty.

THE outlook for the cattle and beef sector remains ‘very positive’ but factories must step up to the mark in paying the ‘true market value’ for stock, according to Galway IFA Livestock Rep, Micheál Haverty.

He told the Farming Tribune that while there was a huge market demand for Irish beef there was still a massive discrepancy in prices between the Republic and Northern Ireland.

“There is absolutely no reason over recent weeks why the factories shouldn’t be paying at least another 15c to 20c per kilo for cattle.

“All the market pointers show the demand that is there for Irish beef and farmers should really try and bargain hard with the factories to get a better price than what’s being quoted,” said Micheál Haverty.

He added that with cattle in scarcer supply – the kill for the third week of November was down by 1,200 as compared to last year – the factories were under growing pressure to meet orders.

Marts around the county have also reported an increase in ‘agent activity’ as factories depend more on the marts to fill the gap in supplies coming in the gate to them.

Loughrea Mart reported last week a bigger interest from agents trying to source finished – or almost finished – cattle for the meat plants.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Dunmore’s Market Day makes a return

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Pictured at the launch of Dunmore Market Day were Vivienne Glynn, Tommie Howley, Damien O Se, Mark Ryan, Mark Jennings, Peter Walken, Barry Flynn, Helen Gunning, John Mulrennan, Janette Glynn and Councillor Joe Sheridan. Photo: Johnny Ryan Photography.

THE traditional outdoor farmers’ market in Dunmore is being revived this weekend when there will be some 50 stalls on display.

However, it will be scaled back from what was originally planned with the organisers confining it to just one day on this coming Saturday.

The traditional market day has been synonymous with the annual summer festival but the current pandemic has put paid to this event happening for the past couple of years.

It was then decided by the Dunmore Traders to hold a market that would coincide with Christmas and would also include the hugely popular tractor run which was introduced in recent years.

Well-known local businessman, Tommie Howley told Farming Tribune that this has become the “winter version” of the summer market day and it was the intention of the traders to add something of a festive air to it as well.

“It will provide a social occasion for people to meet in a safe environment as well as giving them an opportunity to browse around the many stalls and attractions that will be provided on the day,” Tommie explained.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Connacht Tribune

On yer bike – from Ardrahan to Dublin city

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Pictured at the IFA ‘Save Irish Farming’ protest in Dublin last Sunday were: Roy O Brien, IFA; Rose Mary McDonagh, Caherlistrane; Peter Gohery, Eyrecourt; Bertie Roche, Abbey, Loughrea; Liam Higgins, Athenry; Pat Murphy, Ardrahan; Anne Mitchell, Menlough; Martin Murphy, Turloughmore; and Declan McDonagh, Caherlistrane.

‘ON, yer bike, and off to Dublin in the green, in the green’ – that was the motto last weekend of Ardrahan’s Pat Murphy who cycled his way to Dublin for the IFA rally in Merrion Square on Sunday.

“I enjoy doing a bit of cycling, although I hadn’t done a lot in preparation for a trip to Dublin, but I got through it all right,” the Connacht IFA Chairman, told the Farming Tribune.

He said that the motive for completing his 206km, two-day journey from his native Ardrahan to the IFA Farm Centre in Bluebell, Dublin, was to help draw attention to Sunday’s national rally.

Pat ‘broke the back’ on the journey on Friday when he cycled to Kinnegad with the help of a back-up vehicle, courtesy of daughter Ciara and her boyfriend, Conor Niland while Mike McInerney and Martin Murphy, cycled part of the Galway trip with him.

Galway IFA Chairperson Anne Mitchell provided the support on the second part of the trip and Pat Murphy was glad of the support. “It was great to have that back-up vehicle on both days in case anything went wrong, and it also helped to provide an extra element of safety for the trip,” he said.

According to Anne Mitchell, the IFA man averaged 27kph on that last leg of the trip which she said was ‘great going’, given the wet conditions on Saturday morning.

A head wind on the journey from Kilbeggan to Kinnegad proved to be the toughest part of the cycle for Pat Murphy, who said that the whole purpose of the cycle and Sunday’s rally was to highlight the issues facing farmers over the coming years.

“The decisions being taken now on CAP, nitrates and climate change in relation to farming will have major implications for the future of agriculture over the next 15 to 20 years.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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