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A Different View

At the end of the day it’s a sporting cliché

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Young Galway supporters at the Leinster Hurling Championship semi-final against Kilkenny at O'Connor Park in Tullamore last Sunday.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

The World Cup coverage may have rammed home the point, but it’s long been obvious that footballers – and indeed sports people of all ilk – have an unhealthy preoccupation with the end of the day.

Not in the way Van Morrison sang about the end of the day, when we give thanks and pray….this isn’t actually to do with a cycle of daily life at all.

But in interview after interview, these Sporting Gods preface every second sentence with the phrase – and every other sentence begins with the word ‘obviously’.

In fairness to ‘obviously’ however, it can be seen as a moment to gather their considerable thoughts or perhaps to emphasise the point. At the end of the day, on the other hand, is a sort of modern equivalent to ‘when all is said and done’ – but it doesn’t have anything to do with dusk or, indeed, night.

Its use is often followed by the name of a sports pundit – or better still his nickname in the quintessential old pals act – as in: “at the end of the day, Gary” or “at the end of the day, Gilesy”.

Then it’s joined to a breathtakingly obvious fact: “At the end of the day Garry, football is a game of two halves,” and if you really want to reinforce your point, conclude your insight with ‘no question about it’.

Of course Eamon Dunphy can inject life into his analysis with the odd ‘f’ word, but that’s better than ‘I must be honest here’ – as though you’ve been lying heretofore – or ‘You’d have to say….’ when what you really mean is ‘I have to say’.

But we all know there’s a whole language to sports punditry that’s known only to those who practice very hard at it. Muck of the time it’s designed as a way to pretend you’re actually saying something critical when you’re really saying little or nothing at all.

So, star players are always ‘arguably’ the best players on the field, as though arguing over it someone strengthens your stance.

And one of the ways to win a football game is to play better than anyone could expect of you – as in, you give it 110%. Because to play to your full God-given potential is somehow never quite enough.

Good players, incidentally, will always step up to the plate. Which is fine if you understand the rules of baseball, but otherwise it suggests they’re forever eating big dinners, when they should really be watching their diet.

There’s no end to the sporting insights you can glean from players and pundits alike – gems like ‘a win is a win’, ‘we came here to win’ and ‘goals win games’.

Some games as ‘must win’ games – as thought others really aren’t – and good teams know that it’s never over ‘til it’s over….although occasionally the manager might concede that they simply ran out of time.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Changing times for the Church – but still a distance left to travel

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

It’s the best part of twenty years since I delivered my one and only sermon to the masses at the Masses – in the salubrious surrounds of Mullingar Cathedral.

It wasn’t an actual sermon of course, but more a talk where the sermon should have been, on a Sunday during Lent in the year 2004.

I’d been in Rwanda with a team from Trocaire, where we’d seen tangible evidence of a world devoid of humanity, ten years after the genocide that had wiped out up to a million Tutsis in one hundred days.

Each year for their Lenten campaign, Trocaire choose a specific region in the world to highlight their work and the plight of the people there – so it might be Honduras after Hurricane Mitch, Nigeria and its endemic food poverty…or, in this case, the aftermath of genocide in Rwanda.

The sheer barbarism of what happened in this Country of a Thousand Hills will remain embedded on my brain for the rest of my days – and that was a decade after it happened. And that’s the story I was telling from the altar in Mullingar Cathedral.

I’d originally be slated down for Saturday evening Mass and then maybe one on Sunday – but I sort of got into a rhythm on Saturday night and volunteered to do all of the Masses the following day.

The final one was the Bishop’s own Mass, and Michael Smith was a man wholeheartedly committed to the work of Trocaire – so even he stood aside to let me at it.

And to crown it all, my wife and two little boys of five and four (as they were) sat in the congregation for this big finale.

But anyone with small children will know that keeping them quiet and attentive for the duration of a Mass is a job of work, and soon they began to grow restless.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Fall in home ownership leaves renters with uncertain future

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Life used to be simple, if predictable; you went to school, got a job – or first did a degree to get a job – bought a house, had a family, paid off the mortgage over 20 years, and accumulated a small nest egg to allow for a fairly comfortable retirement.

Now you’re likely to be paying off your mortgage into those golden years – and that’s if you’re one of the lucky ones. Because you might also be one those who never quite managed to buy, still paying exorbitant rent on a fraction of your former income.

And yet when you read about the rental crisis, it’s just about the here and now – when the real nuclear explosion won’t blow until Generation Rent become pensioners.

But they manage it in other countries, you say – and they do. Because they have rents that are fixed for a lifetime (in some cases even beyond that, so that a family can stay in their home for another generation) and they can’t be evicted just because there’s more to be made as an Airbnb.

Simple economics show that, if your rent is a couple of grand a month and your pension is a fifth or a quarter of your former salary, you won’t be able to keep up the monthly payments.

And then what happens?

Will pensioner tenants be turfed out, forced to live on the streets – or to huddle down in the spare room of their children’s rented accommodation?

If people buy homes now – if they can afford to – it’s already likely to be ten or more years later than their parents did.

And given the more transitory nature of employment these days, they may also move home more than once – unlike the vast majority of their parents, who bought their home after they got married and stayed there for the rest of their lives.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Things we used to do – and habits we never had before

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

One of the realities of getting older is that there are things we used to be able to do that we can’t do now – and things we do now that we never used to do before.

We used to know phone numbers by heart; we used to be able to do basic addition, subtraction, division and multiplication in our heads; we used to tell the time by looking at the big hand and the little hand on a clock.

And if we had a watch it told us the time or if it was very posh, it also told us the date – although very often only if you remembered to push it forward when the month didn’t have 31 days in it.

Now your watch will tell you how many steps you’ve taken in the last 24 hours, what your heart rate is and if there are any emails in your in-box.

We had records or CDs or cassette tapes to store our favourite music; sometimes we still do, but the notion that we could have every song ever recorded on a telephone that wasn’t even plugged into the wall would have been too much to even contemplate.

We went to call boxes to ring home, if we could find one with a phone that wasn’t pulled off its axis – and we kept a supply of two-pence pieces because you needed a pair of them to make the call.

We used to be able to play on a quieter road, even if we had to stop the game and move aside for the occasional car; we used to write letters and wait a week for a reply.

Lego came in a big packet with just a random collection of different sized plastic bricks – and from that you made a house or a car.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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