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Easter concert from Baroque Singers

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Galway Baroque Singers will be in concert in Galway Cathedral next Friday, April 25 when they will be joined by the National Sinfonia Orchestra to sing three Handel works, Zadok the Priest (which will be familiar to many people as the background music for the UEFA Champions’ League); Ode for the Birthday of Queen Anne and Utrecht Jubilate.

All three are exciting, lively pieces and the singers, with their director Audrey Corbett, have enjoyed working on them for the past few weeks. 

In total contrast, for the second half of the concert, the choir will perform the glorious, moving Mozart’s Requiem, the last work composed by Mozart before his death; in fact he passed away before he finished  it and it was completed by one of his students, Sussmayer. The Requiem is one of the most popular works in the choral repertoire.

The Galway Baroques will be joined by soloists Colette Boushell, soprano, Stephen Wallace, counter tenor, Stuart Kinsella, tenor, Geoffrey Ledwidge, bass, and Proinnsías Ó Duinn will conduct the combined forces in what promises to be an evening of  wonderful, uplifting music in Galway Cathedral.

Following their highly acclaimed performance of Messiah at Christmas, singers look forward to presenting this new concert to their friends and supporters.

 Tickets costing €20/15 concession are on sale at Charlie Byrne’s Bookshop. Doors open at 7.30 pm for the concert which is at 8pm.

 

Connacht Tribune

Un-learn bad breathing for the simplest health remedy

Denise McNamara

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Dermot Ryan kicked a four-decade long smoking habit after just two sessions of the Pranayama breathing technique

Health, Beauty and Fashion by Denise McNamara

After 40 years of smoking, Dermot Ryan arrived after a long journey at his yoga teacher training course in the southern Indian state of Kerala with one thing on his mind. Where would he be able to light up?

When he couldn’t find a suitable location, he went straight to class, with the teacher beginning the first session with lengthy breathing exercises.

After many trips to India and several yoga courses under his belt, it was Dermot’s first introduction to the Pranayama breathing technique and he immediately felt a change.

“I felt more relaxed than usual and would even say slightly, euphoric. I needed a cigarette.”

But that chance did not come and he found himself up again at 6am the following morning for a for nasal cleansing class and then more Pranayama and yoga.

“After our breathing practice, my Yoga practice felt different. What was most surprising was, the rattle in my chest was gone. I mean completely gone. I hadn’t coughed, spluttered or spat when I got up that morning, as I had done for many years.

“In just 12 hours and two Pranayama sessions, my lungs felt renewed and clear of that fluffy and congested feeling which I had grown used to. There was no rattle, no blocked feeling, just a freedom in my breathing that was long lost to me…The feeling of panic that had been in my body had subsided.”

Dermot spent his lockdown teaching online Hatha Yoga classes and writing his first book: Your Breath, Your Life – A Simple Guide to Pranayama and Breathwork.

He believes this book can teach anyone willing to devote 10-15 minutes a day to adopt the practice.

Dermot insists that many of the ailments his students come to him with are all down to poor breathing.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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The Eucharistic Procession arriving at Eyre Square on June 20, 1965.

1920

War deepens

A band hall at Maree, Oranmore, and a vacant house at Gurraun were burned down last Friday night. Details of a raid at the house of a farmer named Devaney, of Ballinacloughy, Maree, were given by his son Thomas, who with his brothers, Stephen and Pat, were admitted to the Galway County hospital on Monday suffering from gunshot wounds. Pat was discharged the same evening.

“It would be about 1.30 (old time) on Saturday morning last,” said Thomas, “when we heard knocking at the front and back doors, and a shout, ‘Get up’. My sisters, Norah and Anne, opened the door. They were going to get a light but the raiders stopped them. The raiders had a flash lamp. They went into the room to my father, and brought him down to the kitchen and made him put up his hands.

“They then came into the room where I and my three brothers, Stephen, Pat and Eddie, were in bed. They caught me by the shoulder and pulled me out first, and then they took Stephen and Pat out. They brought us out on the road and put the three of us down on our knees and told us to pray. They let us up and told us to pray again and they fired shots over our heads. Then we got the order to march and they made us walk about sixteen yards. They put the three of us in a line across the road. They then fired two gunshots at us from distance of sixteen yards. Stephen and I were hit in the legs.

“There were 84 pellets in one of my legs and 60 in the other. Pat got a pellet in the stomach, one in the chest, and one in the arm. After they had fired the two shots they told us to go into the house. We were hardly able to walk, and we told them we were shot. One of them said, ‘What about another round’? We went in the house and they went away.

Bidding for peace

We understand that Mr. Lloyd George was to have received the committee of the Irish Peace Conference in Downing Street yesterday (Thursday) and that certain proposals for the establishment of a truce and a subsequent settlement were to have been put to him.

The speeches of the Prime Minister in North Wales, which we report in this issue, do not seem to suggest that he is preparing the way for a settlement. Yet there can be no doubt that the vast majority of the English people desire peace with the sister isle, and Ireland for her part wants nothing so much to-day as tranquillity and ordered government.

In the face of these realities, the plain man can be forgiven if he fails to understand why a condition of things is permitted to continue in Ireland which is a disgrace to civilisation.

The explanation is to be found not in the conditions that exist so much as in the malignant policy that brought them about. Until that is reversed, we fear there is little hope of permanent peace or security.

Mr. Asquith has made a bold bid for tis reversal, but we cannot forget that when he was in power, he originated and gave official sanction to the mischievous policy of partisanship for North-East Ulster.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Country Living

A time when common sense and rules make for uneasy bedfellows

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Cold comforts for those hardy souls trying to enjoy their pint of plain.

Country Living with Francis Farragher

The other evening as I made the decision to chance having a couple of pints in the great outdoors, the thought struck me that there comes a time when that most invaluable asset for a decent existence — namely common-sense — gets thrown to the wolves. When sets of rules, laws and restrictions are brought in for the so-called greater good, there are casualties along the way, and many of them are ones that can be avoided.

That evening, there were two men in the corner of ‘the garden’ who should have been enjoying their usual chat over a pint of plain, in relative comfort and warmth. Surely one of life’s little pleasures, as the passing years slip by into decades and if we’re all lucky enough to live into what Big Tom called in his song, ‘The Sunset Years of Life’.

Between them, those two customers have enjoyed at least 150 summers but instead of being able to enjoy their couple of pints and chat inside a very warm, cheerful and most importantly of all spacious bar or lounge, they had to endure a biting wind from the north-west. They were ‘white with the cold’.

Now, there may be greater problems out there in the big bad world and the worrying Winter that we’re now facing into, but I would just love if Mr. Micheál, Mr. Leo and Mr. Eamon could explain very simply to me why it would not be eminently more sensible to let those two old-timers enjoy their chat and couple of pints indoors without risking getting a bad cold or a severe dose of pneumonia.

Alas, I fear, we’re now seemingly all doomed to suffocate in a Winter of doom and gloom. Last Sunday morning, as I viewed the newspapers from the stands, one publication was trying to outdo the other in terms of telling us how bad things were going to be over the coming weeks or months. Only, after some deliberation, did I grudgingly decide to buy one of them. There is after all, only so much bad news that any sane mind can absorb.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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