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Connacht Tribune

Dublin tribute band play tribute to grunge greats

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The Seattle Grunge Experience.

Groove Tube with Jimi McDonnell – tribunegroove@live.ie

Coming to Monroe’s Live on Friday, July 7, The Seattle Grunge Experience play songs from an era when bands like Soundgarden, Alice In Chains, Pearl Jam and Nirvana blared from millions of stereos. The genre’s continued popularity was clear from Eddie Vedder’s recent shows in the 3 Arena and The Marquee, Cork – tickets to see the Pearl Jam singer were like gold dust. But grunge also made the headlines recently when Soundgarden singer Chris Cornell died tragically while on tour.

“At first, I couldn’t believe it,” says Dave Horan, lead singer with the Dublin-based Seattle Grunge Experience. “We were talking about it in the band – Chris Cornell and Eddie Vedder were the two guys who made it out of the grunge scene. The kind of beacons that said it didn’t have to go the way of Kurt Cobain and [Alice in Chains singer] Layne Staley.”

Like Vedder, Chris Cornell’s career was blossoming in his early 50s.  He had sung a James Bond theme song, been hugely successful with Audioslave and had reunited with Soundgarden. And one thing defined all these projects – Cornell’s inimitable voice.

“He was up there with Freddie Mercury as just an untouchable singer,” Dave says. “His vocal range was fantastic, but it was his ability to control notes that was just phenomenal. He had such technique.”

Dave is therefore asking a lot of his own singing range – but he has been living with these songs for quite a while.

“I grew up listening to grunge, that’s where I learned to sing – from Eddie Vedder and Chris Cornell,” Dave says. “So, I’ve spent however long it’s been since grunge – let’s say 25 years – learning how to sing that way. When I was a kid I was sitting in a field with my friends, singing Chris Cornell and Eddie Vedder songs. So, I’ve been practising since then!”

If you do see The Seattle Grunge Experience live, you may notice Dave clicking a pedal with his foot. What’s going on there?

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Road widening will facilitate safer walkway on route to Knockma Hill

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Campaigners from the Weir Road and Killaloonty areas in Tuam who are demanding improved footpaths. From left: Monica Fahy, Arthur Connern, Mary Reilly, Eamonn Kitt, Bridie McCruddan, Loaise, Deirdre and Dylan Moran, Winnie and Michael Connachton, Teresa Guidera, Declan Moran, Michael Melvin, Michael Cullen and Councillor Pete Roche. Photo: Jacinta Fahy (Johnny Ryan Photography).

The widening of a road through a North Galway village and the removal of a bad bend can now facilitate the construction of a footpath to one of the most visited attractions in the area.

Galway County Council is involved in a land exchange in Belclare that will allow the construction of a footpath that will eventually bring walkers all the way out to Knockma Hill in Castlehackett.

And Cllr Donagh Killilea (FF) told a meeting of Galway County Council that the provision of the footpath to the popular walking destination would complement the recent completion of the renewal scheme in the village.

He said that a road realignment and the provision of a footpath could not be done without the cooperation of local landowners and he complimented those involved for making this possible.

The meeting was told that following the widening of the R333 (Belclare to Castlehackett road) there was a parcel of land that was surplus to requirements along the stretch.

Director of Services, Derek Pender, explained that it is normal practice to offer such a portion of land to the owner from whom it was originally purchased.

From liaising with the landowner, it became apparent that he was also the owner of lands on which Galway County Council wished to construct a footpath in Belclare village.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Headford prepares for weekend of music as Headfest returns from Covid break

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Headfest organisers (from left) Liam McDonagh, Jimmy Wall, Aisling Keogh, Mike Connell and Avril Conneely.

It’s been three years since the last Headfest, and the festival organisers are delighted to be back again, doing what they love — bringing music and fun to Headford’s June Bank Holiday Weekend. And thanks to the local Men’s Shed group, they’re setting the bar higher than ever this time!

This year’s festival line-up includes Mike Denver with locals Break Free on Friday, June 3; All Folk’d Up with another local act, The Shift, on Saturday June 4, and Johnny Brady with Ciaran Rosney on Sunday, June 5.

In addition to this, there is a family-friendly music event under the Ceol an tSamhraidh banner, on Monday, June 6, featuring Little John Nee, with Tara Stacey as support.

This event is supported by Galway County Council Arts Office and funded through the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media Local Live Performance Scheme.

As always, Headfest continues to be driven by the community, with the generous support of local business who sponsor three evenings of music from renowned Irish acts over the course of the weekend, said committee member Aisling Keogh.

“Beyond this though, there is a very real community spirit at the heart of the festival. Requests for help from various clubs and groups are always met with a positive response,” she added.

In an unusual turn of events, this means that in 2022, Headford Men’s Shed are actually making the bar counter for the festival tent.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Environmental campaigners complain to EC over last-gasp efforts to retain Windfarm

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Derrybrien...the clean-up afte rthe original mud slide on the windfarm site.

Campaigners against the Derrybrien Windfarm have hit out at local politicians vying to retain the development after two decades of breaching planning laws.

They have sent a letter to the Directorate-General for Environment of the European Commission which includes articles published in the Connacht Tribune detailing the debates in Galway County Council about the issue, which they say highlights the local authority’s lack of “credibility in respect of exercising their supervisory jurisdiction”.

Martin Collins of the Friends of Derrybrien Environment declared it akin to “appearing on the pitch when the game has been played because you don’t like the result”.

“It is an extremely long-winding saga but at the end of the day, we’ve reached a point, after 20 years, that’s the end of the legal road,” he exclaimed

“For councillors or TDs to think they can overthrow all that history and just keep it running away – it’s just not legally possible. Even the ESB and the Government have accepted it must come down. We just have to accept the reality of things, the facts, figures and the law are there.”

Galway County Councillors sent a motion to the Government urging it to direct the ESB to recommence operation of the windfarm and enact legislation to protect it from further legal challenge. That motion was later echoed by Deputy Sean Canney in the Dáil.

The original European Court of Justice (ECJ) decision handed down in 2008 declared the 70-turbine windfarm an unauthorised development as the proper safeguards had not been followed during its construction in 2003 when a major bog slide occurred. When nothing was done to remove it, the ECJ fined the State €5 million over its failure to comply with EU legislation and set an additional daily fine of €15,000 until it did. Those fines are estimated to have reached around €19m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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