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Dr Dilis wide awake to the benefits of healing sleep

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Lifestyle – Judy Murphy talks to a GP and herbalist who has turned her focus onto sleep problems

You know the feeling. You fall in to bed before midnight, eyes heavy with sleep, only to find that while you had been snoozing blissfully on the couch an hour before, now you couldn’t be more wide awake.  

Or maybe you manage to drop off, only to wake up in the middle of the night and find that sleep eludes you until it’s almost time to get up.

Anecdotal and statistical evidence shows that sleep deprivation is one of the biggest problems of modern society. Whether it’s because of small children, using high-tech gadgets, shift-work, stress, or generally poor lifestyles, many of us are facing into each new morning almost as exhausted as we were when we fell asleep.

Dr Dilis Clare, a qualified GP and herbalist, who runs Health and Herbs in Galway City’s Sea Road, says she can help, courtesy of a dedicated Sleep Clinic which she has just launched.

For some cases, it may take time to find a solution, but they do exist, she stresses.

“If someone has 33 years of sleeping problems you can’t expect to be better in a month, but if you aren’t sleeping better after three months, then I’d fire myself!”

Entering her shop and practice in Sea Road is to discover a world where natural medicine reigns supreme. There is an array of tinctures and dried herbs for a variety of conditions from the menopause to stress and, of course, insomnia. These are all made by Dr Clare, who also produces a range of skin creams and teas, using herbs and other natural ingredients.

Just inside the door, there is a dispensing drawer containing a selection of the most popular herbs that people can buy individually, including elderflower, rose, slippery elm, marigold and sage. These were available to people long before the recession, says Dr Clare, who set up on Sea Road in 1992.

But, as she points out, she is also qualified to prescribe more conventional medicine as she is a qualified GP.

Her Sleep Clinic, which was launched by Consultant Respiratory Physician, Dr JJ Gilmartin, follows on from a Heart Clinic, which she also runs out of Health and Herbs.

it’s all part of raising awareness of Health &Herbs, where both herbal and pharmaceutical medicine are offered – integrated medicine is how Dr Clare describes it, saying it offers the best of both science and tradition.

One in every three people will die of heart disease, but most won’t do anything to prevent it, because heart problems don’t hurt until you get an attack, she observes. But lack of sleep does hurt, so people look for help.

Broken sleep can be caused by various factors, she explains. It can be stress, it can be pain such as arthritis, it can be problems with digestion – there are many reasons. If there’s a problem with sleep apnoea she will refer people to Dr Gilmartin’s Sleep Clinic, which specialises in that area. Dr Clare deals specifically with insomnia and sleep problems – although people who have these may also have sleep apnoea, she points out. In any case, everybody here is treated individually.

The first step with a client is a consultation with nutritionist Michelle Hanley, who studied at both UL and NUI Maynooth, and who has been working with Dr Clare for five years. Clients will keep a three-day food diary and then have a diet and lifestyle analysis with Michelle. Working from their food diary, she will offer practical help on changing eating habits, providing menus, shopping lists and recipes for food that will help aid sleep.

She will teach them the benefits of eating certain food, including fibre and essential fatty acids – people forget how important these are in maintaining health, she says. Any food intolerances will also be analysed – it might just be that someone is eating too much of a certain type of food and needs more variety.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Mayor of Galway, Cllr Michael Smyth, turning the first sod of the new £86,000 community centre at Shantalla on August 6, 1971

1921

Treatment of women

At the meeting of the Galway Board of Guardians on Wednesday, Mr. Pk. Thornton in the chair, a discussion took place regarding the admission of women with illegitimate children.

Mr. Cooke said that it was one of those questions which the Dáil Éireann was trying to solve. The assistant clerk said that Galway was only a small place in comparison to other places.

A member said that these people were coming in month after month, and it was perfectly scandalous.

Mrs. Young said that the practice should be stopped as in England. The assistant clerk said that they had laws of their own in England in regard to this matter. Mrs. Young said that it was a matter that the guardians should go into.

Clerk: So these women assist in washing and scrubbing, Mr. O’Toole?

Master: Yes, they do.

Mrs. Young: Until you tackle the thing, you can never make much headway. The nuns were terrified by some of them who absolutely refused to work.

Mr. Cooke: They should be cleared out.

Chairman: It is not fair for any able-bodied woman to be in the workhouse at the ratepayers’ expense.

The clerk said that this question was one of the most difficult which had confronted Dáil Éireann, and they were looking the matter up.

Profiteering black spot

Galway is the blackest spot in Ireland for profiteering. It is maintaining its inglorious record in extortion – a record that all but killed the race meeting some years ago and diverted the stream of visitors from the town for nearly a decade.

If this flagrant profiteering continues, it will have the result of reducing the city ultimately to poverty, whilst the few grow rich. The economic balance must be maintained. Elsewhere desperate efforts are being made to maintain it.

Prices must come back. Labour in Galway has done absolutely nothing to bring them back, because Labour in Galway appears to be less intelligently led than elsewhere. Yet unemployment is rife amongst us, poverty is already knocking consistently at the door of not a few, wages are falling and must fall.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Connacht Tribune

Overcoming obstacles thrown up by pandemic

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Founder of Stepping Stones low-cost counselling clinic, Chelsie Daly. Her book is called Covid-19 and Ever Changing Life.

Fashion, beauty and lifestyle with Denise McNamara

Many workers have returned to the office this week for the first time since Covid-19 flattened our population.  Of course there will be those rejoicing at the prospect of getting out of the house, milling with other humans and being able to grab a coffee that’s not from your own kettle.

But no doubt it is a daunting prospect for a sizeable proportion of the workforce.

After so long isolated from friends, family and regular routine, returning to an enclosed space with others who are not obliged to be vaccinated can be frightening.

As psychotherapist Chelsie Daly explains, many of us who never struggled with our mental health continue to experience feelings that are difficult to process.

“I have found that Covid-19 has affected everyone of us. I have noticed an increase in anxiety among my clients due to the ever-changing reality of the past year and a half. It was difficult to adapt to lockdown and once we learned how to do that we are returning to life as it was before, which has also increased anxiety in many of us,” she reflects.

Chelsie, 26, set up a low-cost counselling service in Glenrock Business Park in Galway City called Stepping Stones in 2018. It started as an outlet to share information and meeting peers for coffee and walks. While completing her masters in 2019 it grew into a practice with five therapists, offering sessions costing €40.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Country Living

We should never have doubted Orwell in his ‘1984’ predictions

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

AS old fogeys go, I am, up to a certain point, reasonably comfortable with the basics (well the ‘very basics’) of technology. I work on a Dell computer, I have an iPhone, I like looking up weather charts on the different sites, but I’m still a little perplexed with the notion that almost every move I make can be watched by someone out there in the ether.

A friend of mine, who changed his phone relatively recently, could show me his movements on a particular day from a couple of years back, and I have always wondered why some advertisements which might be of special interest to me keep appearing on my screen when I’m looking up something.

I also remember being quite ashamed back the years to admitting that I was the owner of a mobile phone. Somehow, it seemed to indicate that I had risen above my station in life, so it was only used on very limited occasions, and hardly at all in public.

That old Fordson Major of a phone that I first owned did though, here and there, have its uses. There was a day down by the river when I needed someone to plug out the electric fence at the home base, and there was just unbounded joy at being able to ring from the waterside, get through, and be able to work away without having to walk back to complete that chore.

In fairness to the old Nokia (or was it a Motorola?), she was quite a trusted friend. On one occasion, it fell from the tractor, split into a number of different pieces, but still worked again when all the bits were put together. It didn’t really matter that in half the places I went to, there was either zero coverage or the feeling that the person at the other end of the line was millions of miles away, which I think has led to a habit that I’ve never quite kicked, namely that of shouting into the phone.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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