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CITY TRIBUNE

Doyle fires Galway WFC into semi-finals of the Cup

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Mervue United's Enda Curran turns away from the challenge of Corrib Rangers' Kevin Fitzpatrick. Photos: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

Galway WFC  1

DLR Waves    0

Soccer Wrap by Mike Rafferty

Sometimes teams just do what they have to do in order to succeed and that appeared to be the case in Eamonn Deacy Park on Saturday evening as an opening-half goal gave Galway WFC an advantage they seldom looked like losing in this FAI Cup Women’s quarter-final.

It was California native McKenna Doyle who struck for the only goal of the game and, in the process, send them through to the last four for the first-time ever. Here the competition gets a lot more difficult as the top four teams in the league are all still standing, with one of Peamount United, Shelbourne or Wexford Ladies their opponents when the semi-final draw is made.

Billy Clery’s charges were comfortable 3-0 winners when these two sides met earlier in the league and based on overall performance, a home win was expected. To say they laboured somewhat is putting it mildly. Galway WFC dominated the majority of possession, but rarely turned it into a test for visiting goalkeeper, Sophie Lennon.

With the back four in the comfort zone and untested all evening, the onus was on the home side to create and finish and while they did a certain amount, they still struggled in front of goal. Chloe Singleton had an early effort saved at the near post by Lennon, before Sadhbh Doyle released McKenna Doyle behind the cover, but she lashed over from close range.

Doyle atoned for that miss with a splendid goal on 28 minutes. Meadbh De Burca provided the assist down the left and from her cross, the American student ran in to power a header past Lennon for a 1-0 advantage.

While Lynsey McKey dragged an effort wide, most of the chances were falling the way of McKenna Doyle, but her shooting boots required adjusting as the finishing was poor. The resumption saw the home side continue to threaten as Sinead Donovan, Aoife Thompson, Sadhbh Doyle and De Burca enjoyed midfield supremacy, but chances continued to be hard to come by.

Against a better team, they could have been punished and Galway WFC did have a late let off when ‘keeper Abbie Ronayne had to make a smart save at her near post to bat away a Catherine Cronin effort.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Teenager caught with €20,000 worth of cannabis

Enda Cunningham

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A teenager was stopped and searched by Gardaí in Eyre Square on Monday evening, and found in possession of an estimated €20,000 worth of cannabis.

Members of the Galway Divisional Drugs Unit stopped the man, aged in his late teens, at around 6pm and searched him under the Misuse of Drugs Act. During the search the man was found in possession of a €20,000 of suspected cannabis herb. The drugs seized will be sent for forensic analysis.

He was arrested and detained at Garda Headquarters in Renmore and was released from custody this morning. A file is now being prepared for the Director of Public Prosecutions.

 

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CITY TRIBUNE

‘Crass stupidity’ to allow Leisureland close

Stephen Corrigan

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The looming threat of closure for Leisureland after Christmas amounts to “crass stupidity” and requires an urgent commitment for funding from Government, according to a local TD.

Deputy Catherine Connolly told the Galway City Tribune she had raised the issue in the Dáil with the Minister of State for Local Government and he had expressed an openness to meeting with a delegation from City Hall in relation to the City Council-owned facility’s dire financial situation.

“It’s simply not acceptable that a public swimming pool would close when we have the Minister for Finance announcing a budget of €18 billion this week – that’s Monopoly money.

“We have €18 billion to dispense and the challenge is to do that in a way that ensures a basic level of services below which we cannot go, and that requires funding the local authority. The local authority is fundamental in any civilised society, as are the services it provides,” said the Independent Deputy.

Raising the issue in Leinster House, Deputy Connolly said that Leisureland was an excellent public facility that had been open since 1973 and had broke even for the last number of years, but had run into major funding shortfalls as a result of Covid-19 restrictions.

“It is a fantastic swimming pool. I must declare a conflict of interest as I use it every weekend, It helps to keep me semi-sane and semi-fit.

“No public swimming pool makes money and few of them break even. This pool needed money due to Covid-19 and the difficulties experienced by every public swimming pool in the country. The management in the City Council said it was not in a position to give it money and that the swimming pool would have to close,” said Deputy Connolly, adding that the decision had been made and staff were informed.

Due to public pressure and resistance from local councillors, the decision was reversed and €207,000 in funding had been provided by the Council Executive.

“However, it pointed out that the money was coming out of next year’s budget, so it could not continue, and it would not be in a position to fund it.

“I do not expect miracles, but I expect commitment from the Minister and the Government that, regardless of what happens, we are not going to close public swimming pools or public libraries. They are essential services,” said Deputy Connolly.

She said €2.5 million in funding had been made available for “swimming pools with public access” in the private sector as part of the Government’s July Stimulus package, but nothing for publicly-owned facilities.

“It is very ironic if we are going to keep private swimming pools open once they have some limited access to the public, while we close down the public swimming pools,” she added.

Responding, Minister Peter Burke said his Department was keeping spending and cash flow at local authorities under constant review and would continue to work with Galway City Council to address issues.

“My Department is engaging with representatives of the local government sector and the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform on the financial challenges facing local authorities as a direct consequence of the pandemic, in terms of additional costs incurred as part of the local government response and decline in local authority income streams.

“I will do my very best with regard to the Deputy’s ask. I would be willing to meet a delegation from the City Council in connection with this issue. However, there are going to be significant asks emanating from this crisis. We are doing our very best to make what we have go as far as it can. It presents a major challenge,” said Minister Burke.

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CITY TRIBUNE

HSE not paying rent to councils for use of Galway Airport

Dara Bradley

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Galway Airport is being provided to the Health Service Executive (HSE) free of charge, the County Council has confirmed.

The Carnmore facility, jointly owned by Galway’s two local authorities, is being used as a drive through Covid-19 testing centre for the city and county.

It was confirmed to County Councillor Gabe Cronnelly (Ind) that neither the City nor County Council are benefiting financially from the HSE for the use of the facility. And he wasn’t happy.

He said Galway Airport was being given over to the HSE free-of-charge, at a time when the County Council budget was in deficit to the tune of €1.4 million at the latest count.

“The HSE isn’t paying anything to use the airport for testing. If it was the other way round, and the County Council was looking for something off the HSE, do you think that they would give it to the Council for nothing?” asked Cllr Cronnelly.

“They pay zero to us; yet we have a big deficit in the budget and Galway is the second-worst funded county council in Ireland. Why are we being so generous with our assets? Our budget is short again this year. We seem to have become a bit of a charity.”

Cllr Cronnelly said that not only was it not making money out of the airport, the County Council was actually spending money on holding meetings elsewhere, because County Hall cannot facilitate a socially distanced meeting.

He suggested that Galway Airport would be capable of facilitating a meeting of 39 councillors plus officials and media – and it would cost the local authority very little because it owns the site.

“It seems to me that there is an awful lot of waste of money going on,” he added.

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