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Dom Flemons – flying a flag for American folk

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Dom Flemons will be playing a combination of musical styles for his gig in Campbell's.

Groove Tube with Jimi McDonnell – tribunegroove@live.ie

If you enjoy roots music, and especially Americana, then Dom Flemons’ gig in Campbell’s Tavern, Cloughanover, on Wednesday, July 27, is for you.

A former member of the Grammy-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops, Dom plans to bring an intriguing mix of sounds to the venue, just outside Headford.

“I’ll be playing a combination of styles of American music, ranging from country blues to early ragtime, early jazz, and I’ll be doing some country,” he says. “I’ll also be interspersing older songs I’ve learned with original material.

“When it comes to performing, I have a few interesting instruments that I bring with me. One is an instrument called the quills, which is like a panpipe. They’re very old, they’re played everywhere, but there’s a small tradition of them in the States.”

Although this tour is celebrating the release of Prospect Hill, Dom is already working on its follow-up.

“The next album I have coming out is on the Alamo Black Cowboys,” he says. “I’ve been researching different songs associated with black cowboys. About one quarter of the cowboys who settled the West in the United States were black. It’s something that’s not that well known. Many of the most famous songs, including Home On The Range, are associated with them.”

A native of North Carolina, Dom Flemons is a champion of America’s folk tradition. He is involved with the Music Maker Relief Foundation, a non-profit organisation that works with traditional Southern musicians who have fallen on hard times. He recalls the case of the talented blues guitarist Boo Hanks.

“He was in this very ratty old trailer he’d had for 30,40 years before Music Maker met him,” Dom says. “Through the donations of their supporters, they were able to help Boo get a new trailer and heating oil for the winter. The idea is what can a couple of hundred bucks do for people who are living on less than $8,000 a year.”

On July 4, Independence Day, updated his Facebook profile picture to a photo of himself standing in front of a row of American flags. He also recently took on the name of The American Songster. In a year of more mass shootings and the increasingly divisive Donald Trump, is it fair to say that Dom is looking to celebrate the better side of American culture?

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Stepping away from farm to pursue love of dance

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Lighting is at the heart of Satori, being presented by Lewis Major Projects at Galway International Arts Festival.

Arts Week with Judy Murphy

Growing up in Australia, Lewis Major reckoned he’d follow in his father’ s footsteps and take over the family’s 11,000-acre farm. He loved driving tractors, herding cattle and being involved in sheep-shearing.

But that was before Lewis, whose company is featuring in this year’s Arts Festival, discovered dance, aged 17.

Lewis’s mother, “who was a Bush teacher, but in a different life might have been something else”, regularly brought him to plays and art galleries in his youth, and he enjoyed those outings.

However, it was when he went to boarding school, aged 15, that arts became more important. It was drama initially, but when he started studying dance at the relatively old age of 17, “that was it”, he recalls.

“I was sporty and had a background in physical work – shearing sheep is very physical.”

What Lewis loved about dance was how it combined physicality and drama.

His passion brought him to Europe, to train and perform in classical and modern dance with leading companies, before he eventually became a choreographer.

Choreography was always in the plan but was hastened by injuries he sustained while dancing. Lewis fractured his spine in second year in ballet school due to a congenital condition that might have been diagnosed and sorted had he started dancing earlier. He still performs a bit and will be on stage at the Arts Festival.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Hare Island sees Galway singer delve into his youth

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Eoin Dolan...new single out now.

Groove Tube with Cian O’Connell

Galway singer/songwriter Eoin Dolan’s latest single is a return to some of the sensibilities that informed his earliest work. Hare Island was released on June 22. It is a warm, surf-pop ode to the places to which we attach importance in our youth. A famous city landmark, the island itself sits in the bay just off Ballyloughnane Beach and it is there that much of the song’s nostalgia is rooted. The track’s essence can be claimed by that natural, coastal section of Renmore as much as it can by the people Eoin grew up with, and the feelings they inspire.

The Citóg Records artist’s most recent project was last October’s Mirror Liver – a twelve-track LP that dealt with stories of Neolithic Europe and the fluidity of the human condition.

Clearly, Hare Island is closer to home. At the same time, the word he uses most when talking about the single is escapism. A core idea is approaching your surroundings, in this case Galway City, with a fresh perspective.

“I suppose Galway is synonymous with rain and bad weather,” Eoin notes.

“We get all sorts of weather all year round, but I think Galway people are all about making the best of whatever situation it is. With Hare Island, people have had time over the last while to think about things and embrace a bit of nostalgia.

“Growing up in Renmore, I used to hang out with friends down by Ballyloughane Beach. You’d look across at this island and the causeway out to it. In saying that, it is quite dangerous if you don’t know the tides and that kind of thing. The council have a sign up saying not to go on [the island] but even if you look at it from the shore, as we would often do, you see this causeway and, as the tides would come in, it would disappear.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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CITY TRIBUNE

Farmer Michael returns to stage

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Steve Timothy, who is better known by his alter ego, Farmer Michael.

Galway comedian Stevo Timothy, better known by his stage name, Farmer Michael,  will return the city’s Town Hall Theatre this Saturday, June 25.

Stevo Timothy started doing sketches in his car six years ago and his alter ego Farmer Michael became a viral hit. Less than two years later Stevo did his first gig in Vicar Street and sold out multiple nights across the UK and Ireland.

He then branched out into football, politics and pop culture sketches and now has more than 500,000 followers on social media.

Some of the better-known Farmer Michael videos include There’s no alcoholics in Ireland, F*ck the Mayweathers and Beast from the East. His ‘Evernton’ sketches have made him a cult hero of Everton Football Club.

His videos have featured in a range of online platforms TV shows and have been mentioned by US basketball star turned actor and entertainer Shaquille O’Neal as well as comedian, actor and director Marlon Wayans.

From depression and Donald Trump to gun control and Leo Varadkar, Farmer Michael tackles topical news with a satirical eye and that’s what he’ll be doing in the Town Hall Theatre this Saturday night.

Tickets for his show, which starts at 8pm, are €25 from tht.ie, 091-569777 or from the theatre box office.

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