Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

CITY TRIBUNE

Does the Irish winter create Irish writers?

Avatar

Published

on

Double Vision with Charlie Adley

Waking to the sound of rain hammering my bedroom windows, I turn on the lamp. 6:45. Above me the wind plays a violin concerto on the roof. After years in this house I know by the pitch of the music the energy of the storm.     Splendid. There are countless downsides to being a writer, but having to get out of bed while it’s still dark isn’t one of them.

Propping up a pillow behind my head I reach for the latest Donal Ryan. I love his writing, particularly his short stories, but for some reason ‘From A Low And Quiet Sea’ hasn’t grabbed me yet. In fact (most unlike me altogether) I read Willie Vlautin’s ‘Don’t Skip Out On Me’ during a break from this one.

What a luxury! For years I commuted into London, physically hurling my body at packed tube trains, just as the doors started to close, so that my impact would allow me to squeeze into the space between glass and wedged workers.

No more.

Now I lie here and read until it’s light, excited and comforted by the knowledge that weatherwise, today’s a write off.

Good writing weather: that’s what I call it.

No need, reason or desire to leave the house. Just get up, do my stretches, make a fire, have breakfast and go to my office. There I can sit and write as long as I want to, because outside it’s lashing.

Not the full sideways effort, but gushing diagonal floods of heavy rain, carried on strong South-Easterly gusts, now smashing against my office window as I sit here, writing this.

Apart from housework, there is nothing else I can do today.

Lovely.

God knows what other poor souls who live rural lives do on days like this. Sometimes being a scribbler feels like a blessing, because I’m condemned to neither loneliness nor Loose Women.

To read Charlie’s column in full, please see this week’s Galway City Tribune.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and  county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

CITY TRIBUNE

Council on standby for Storm Jorge flooding

Enda Cunningham

Published

on

Galway City Council crews will be on standby from Saturday afternoon as Storm Jorge is set to hit the West coast, bringing very strong winds, rain and potential for flooding.

The Council’s Severe Weather Assessment Team met today and will be holding meetings tomorrow and Saturday to monitor the weather forecast and put in place a plan to deal with any potential flooding or wind damage.

Storm Jorge – which was named by Spanish meteorological services and adopted by Met Éireann and the UK’s Met Office to avoid confusion – will see a Status Orange wind warning in place from 6am Saturday to 3am Sunday. A Status Yellow rain warning will be in place in Galway from midnight tonight until midnight Saturday.

The storm will bring southwest, veering west and later northwest winds with means speeds of 65-80km/h and gusts of 110-130km/h.

Rainfall accumulations of 20 to 30mm are expected and Met Éireann has warned of an increased risk of coastal flooding.

The City Council will have crews on standby from 2pm on Saturday and will close the two public carparks in Salthill if it is considered necessary.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Gardaí issue warning on ‘movie money’

Enda Cunningham

Published

on

Some of the 'movie money' which has been seized.

Gardaí have warned of an increase in ‘novelty’ euro notes – which are almost identical to real currency – in circulation.

The notes are usually marked ‘movie money’ or ‘prop money’, but this can often go unnoticed by the person handling it. They do not have any security features.

Revenue Officers have seized notes in varying denominations representing a value of €430,895 in recent mail centre detections.

Detective Superintendent Michael Cryan of the Garda National Economic Crime Bureau said: “People need to be aware that such notes exist and at busy times, especially late at night, they need to exercise a little care and attention.

“These notes are easily identifiable if precautionary checks are made. Also people who try to tender such notes as real face prosecution, a possible prison sentence and a conviction, which is for life. Such convictions have serious ramifications if one wanted to travel, to work in certain sectors and it can affect their credit rating”.

“We advise businesses and members of the public who deal in cash to be aware that such notes are in circulation and take appropriate precautionary measures. Business owners should ensure staff members handling cash are alerted to watch out for these fraudulent notes.

“The use of fraudulent currency when trying to purchase goods or services is an offence under the Criminal Justice (Theft and Fraud Offences) Act 2001 and carries a potential prison sentence of 10 years.

“These fraudulent notes should not be accepted as legal tender and any incidents of persons trying to pay with “prop money” should be reported to Gardaí immediately,” said Det Supt Cryan.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Fire at site of former Corrib Great Southern Hotel

Avatar

Published

on

Emergency services are at the scene of a large fire at the site of the former Corrib Great Southern Hotel which broke out in the early hours of this morning.

Four units of the Galway Fire and Rescue Service were called to the former hotel near GMIT at 5.45am. A unit from Athenry is also in attendance at the scene.

Fire fighters are maintaining a presence at the derelict hotel, which has been the scene of a number of arson attacks over the past number of years.

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Advertisement

Weather

Weather Icon
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending