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Dining with this crowd could give you chronic indigestion

Dave O'Connell

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TV Watch with Dave O’Connell

The main course looked to be mutton dressed as lamb, but it turned out that was just the hostess – and thus began the Sligo stopover for the Come Dine With Me carnival on TV3.

To be honest, I’ve never really got this but given that there are those who wouldn’t even answer the phone when it’s on, it seemed only fair to give the Irish rip-off a chance.

It was immediately apparent that, just as DIY programmes aren’t really about actual DIY, so too the cooking forms something of a backdrop to Come Dine With Me.

In this case, the cast included the aforementioned mutton, Trish Buckley, a woman who wears thigh-high leather boots at an age when comfortable slippers might be a better fit.

The three other women – mature student Monica, Russian minx Maria and token ‘young person’ Aoife – seemed to spend more time vying for the attentions of the lone male, Dimitar the Bulgarian surfer dude, as they did enjoying the food.

But then this is more about personality than potatoes.
The concept is, of course, a simple one – five people take it in turn to host a dinner party for the other four, who in turn score their meal/night out of ten and the winner at the end of the week trousers a thousand euro.

The reality is that dinner is an excuse for a bitching session and the last thing the producers – or indeed our sarky narrator, the appropriately named Dave Lamb – need is a quiet night in, with positive murmurs about the cuisine.

The more outrageous and bitchy the night becomes, the more the guests – and the audience – seem to revel in it; so you insult your host and his/her cooking, you behave disgracefully at the table and ideally you remove most of your clothes and cover yourself in cream and chocolate.

Thus, Monica the mature student turns out to have a dark side; as Dimitar puts it, she seems to say things and then think what to say later.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Sentinel.

CITY TRIBUNE

David’s debut album on sale in local shops

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David Larkin’s debut album, With A Toot on the Flute and a Twiddle on the Fiddle, a tribute to his fellow Roscommon man, Percy French, featured on these pages last week.

For those who want to purchase a copy, the range of places where it’s on sale has increased. Anyone who wants to buy the album can do so by contacting David through Larkin’s Beehive Facebook page. It’s also available at Bell, Book & Candle, The Small Crane, Galway City; Funky Beans, Westside Retail Park, Galway City; OMG / Zhivago, Shop Street, Galway City; and Custy’s Traditional Irish Music Shop, O’Connell Street, Ennis.

Galway City Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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CITY TRIBUNE

Saileog takes up sean-nós singing residency at NUIG

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Saileog Ní Cheannabháin. Her Carna-born father Peadar was her earliest singing influence.

Saileog Ní Cheannabháin has been named as Sean-Nós Singer in Residence at NUIG’s Centre for Irish Studies for 2021.

The sean-nós singer, musician and composer, who was reared in Dublin in an Irish-speaking family, learned traditional and classical music from a very young age.

Saileog’s father, Peadar Ó Ceannabháin comes from the rich tradition of sean-nós singing in Carna and  was one of her earliest influences.

Saileog grew up listening to singers from Iorras Aithneach in Conamara and she includes Seán ‘ac Dhonncha, Sorcha Ní Ghuairim, Dara Bán Mac Donncha and Josie Sheáin Jeaic ‘ac Dhonncha as formative influences.

Her mother Úna Lawlor is a classical violinist and her siblings Eoghan and Muireann are also singers and musicians.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Galway City Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Award-winning author Doireann finds truth ‘in little rituals of life’

Stephen Glennon

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Doireann Ní Ghríofa, whose book A Ghost in the Throat won this year’s An Post Non-fiction Book of the Year Award, took her first breath in Galvia Hospital – now the Bon Secours.

When A Ghost in the Throat, the beautifully-written book by Galway-born author Doireann Ní Ghríofa, was announced as the An Post Non-fiction Book of the Year winner last week, the news came as little surprise to those who’ve read it.

Since its publication, A Ghost in the Throat has received rave reviews. Interweaving lyrical passages with striking prose, it tells the story of a present-day young mother who is drawn to the life of 18th century-poet Eibhlín Dubh Ní Chonaill and her poem, Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire.

Although this was Doireann’s first book of prose, she is far from unknown, having written six critically-acclaimed poetry collections. These have earned her numerous awards including the Seamus Heaney Fellowship and the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature.

Arranged a week in advance, the phone call from the Tribune in the wake of the awards announcement proves to be a timely one. Doireann is giddy with excitement. “I am delighted. The funny thing is that it doesn’t just feel like a win for the book; it feels like a win for the way this book tries to tell the stories of women.”

This is hugely important to Doireann – A Ghost in the Throat begins and ends with the line, ‘This is a female text’ – and she hopes the book is viewed as a celebration of the lives of women, past and present, and the work they do, visible and invisible. “That still often goes overlooked,” she says.

As with Emile Pine’s Notes to Self, Doireann casts light on issues affecting women by sharing intimate details of her life. And it’s not just the big themes she gives consideration to, but life’s banalities. When added together, these can also become a burden.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Galway City Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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