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Galway in Days Gone By

Days Gone By – 1965 – Bomb shelter proposal for new school

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Days Gone By - Taking part in Aeriocht in Rosmuc in July 1967.

Days Gone By – Stories from our archives 100, 75, 50 and 25 years ago

1965 – Females needed to ‘decorate the mahogany’

Dear Sir,

It must be a source of consolation to the ratepayers of Galway that the are offered the privilege to ensure the survival of their top executives in the event of a nuclear bomb attack by subsidising a shelter incorporated in the plan for a new vocational school in the city.

They can assuredly also take pride in being allowed to carry a bigger burden for similar protection inconsistently for the brass hats in Renmore Barracks who might otherwise be expected to become similarly involved in their own preserves on a lunatic ‘white elephant’ effort of this nature.

I suggest that somewhere along the line there must have been loose thinking by the egg heads responsible for conceiving such a fantastic brainwave without sufficient concentration on details overlooked in the planning stage.

I’m fully convinced that the accommodation of the shelter should at least cater for a small group of substantial ratepayers and similar facilities should also be available for a few members of the female sex in a certain category.

This is necessary as an essential guarantee that the “mahogany can be decorated” to keep the machinery functioning if the emergency should arise and it might also be as well to try and preserve a few taxpayers for good measure for the benefit of the army personnel.

Naturally I’m not suggesting that these inferior second-class citizens should be allowed to associate with their superiors in such a dire calamity as envisaged, but with a proper layout it is easy enough to guard against such danger and at the same time provide for the future development of the human race.

Nevertheless, as far as I’m concerned and, as I see it, all categories of citizens in this country are being protected from nuclear bomb attack by United States military power in South Vietnam and elsewhere without any thanks or appreciation from ingrates in high places in this country who have lost trace of our friends by fostering an Afro-Asian axis that is a positive menace to the welfare of this ancient nation.

Yours,

Peter O’Farrell.

For more from the archives: See this week’s Tribune

1915 – Bombardment in Kilnadeema

1940 – Fracas in Bohermore laneway

1990 – Great Southern takeover and European flights for Galway?

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Galway United supporters at Lansdowne Road to see their team defeat Shamrock Rovers AFC to win the 1991 FAI Harp Lager Cup on May 12, 1991.

1922

Tuam Workhouse plans

At Tuam District Council meeting on Saturday, Mr. Kyne asked whether the workhouse buildings were to be kept in their possession. – Chairman: Yes, pending the formation of a local company in the town of Tuam to run it as a factory or some industrial undertaking. There is a nominal rent fixed on it for a few years in order to encourage local enterprise.

Mr. Costello said that Tuam workhouse would accommodate 20,000 people. Loughrea proposed expending £25,000 on the extension of Loughrea, and the L.C.D. refused to sanction it, as Loughrea was only the temporary site for the Home.

In order to cut the ground from under everybody’s feet and to get sanction to the loan, the Loughrea people said they would make Loughrea the permanent Home, and the committee unanimously agreed to that.

Chairman: Yes. – Mr. Costello: Money had to be spent there. Why should the ratepayers have to pay £25,000 simply to suit Loughrea, when the patients all over the county could be accommodated in Tuam, which is also more central than Loughrea? This thing will have to be inquired into as soon as the matters settle. We will demand an explanation why £25,000 of the ratepayers’ money should be expended on an unnecessary outlay.

The clerk was ordered to pay the Treasury money outstanding on the loan account under the Labourers’ Acts.

Mr. Shine, waterworks superintendent, reported that 144 feet of piping and other articles in the workhouse had been sold privately to Mr. Browne, auctioneer, Galway, representing the executive committee.

Mrs. Costello: No one seems to be responsible for this place now. – Mr. Shine said the porter had told him these articles were sold by Mr. Browne. The porter said he could not say whether those articles were sold at auction or not.

Mr. Shine: I believe Mr. Browne said he could do as he liked with the whole building. Mr Kyne proposed that the committee be asked to furnish a statement of the amount realised at the auction, and the names of the persons who purchased.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Staff at Dubarry Shoemakers in Ballinasloe mark 40 years of business in the town on June 1, 1972.

1922

Having their say

Admittedly the Irish people are entitled to have that which they themselves desire. They are the sovereign authority.

When they voted under the shadow of alien guns and bayonets, they showed their scorn for alien rule. To-day, voting under certain disadvantages, but as a people for whom freedom has been won, they have revealed their mid after a fashion that can leave no lingering doubt as to their real desires.

They desire order and peace, instead of disorder and chaos. They have voted for industrial expansion and employment instead of demoralisation and distress that sound economic and national development may cause the whine of distress to cease throughout the land, the tragedy of bankrupt towns and businesses to end, and the atrophying blight of cumulative decay to stop.

They want construction and common-sense instead of destruction and whirling words. They want the chapter of Black-and-Tannery to be closed forever, English domination and interference to cease, and a new Ireland to emerge, making the most of that which it has gained and marching forwards towards greater development in the future.

This is the plain lesson written across all the declared results in the country – and all of them have been declared, with the exception of West Cork, where a hitch has occurred owing to tampering with ballot boxes.

In a Dáil of 120 members so far elected, but thirty-four of the old Anti-Treaty party have been returned. Some of these retain uncontested seats, where their fate was not put to the test. Fifty-five of the members who voted for peace and settlement return to the house.

Search for relations

William Walsh, who is believed to have been born in Aughrim, County Galway, Ireland, a son of Patrick Walsh and Catherine Molloy, who are believed to have been married in Galway about ninety years ago, came to Australia in 1857, died at St. Arnaud, in the State of Victoria, Australia, on the eight day of December, 1920.

By his Will he left the residue of his estate to his first cousins and each of their children living at the date of his death in Ireland. Persons claiming to be cousins or children of the above named William Walsh are herby requested to forward their claims and proofs of their relationship to the undermentioned Solicitor pursuant to a direction made on the thirty-first day of October, 1921, by the Chief Clerk of the Supreme Court of Victoria – William Mitchell, St. Arnaud, Victoria, Australia, Solicitor for the executor of the above-named William Walsh, and to send copies of such claims and proofs to William Roche & Sons, 20 Stephen’s Green North, Dublin, Agents for the Executor’s Solicitor.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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"How do Jacob's get the figs into the Fig Rolls?" was a question that captured the imagination of Ireland when it was first used as part of a marketing campaign by Jacob's for their leading biscuit. Jim Figgerty, pictured here with locals in Loughrea on July 3, 1970, was the only man with the answer! Played by actor Patrick Griffin, Jim Figgerty was part of the company's television campaign in the 1960s and early 1970s and visited towns across the country to promote the brand.

1922

The demon drink

The most contemptible of all types of mankind is he who partakes of intoxicating drink throughout the entire day and far into the night. He is never drunk, nor is he ever sober. He is appropriately called a “soaker”.

At the meeting of the Ard-Fheis, Mr. de Valera made a statement which, to those who do not understand the full significance, may not have appeared very germane to the issue. But we are given to understand that his declaration that he was “sorry the drink evil was coming again to the country” was timely, and ought to be followed up with strong action by those upon whom the discipline and good conduct of the Irish people, and the army, which is their servant, depends.

Mr de Valera said he believed he was expressing the united view of every member of the Dáil and of the Officer Board of Sinn Féin when he said that he believed Ireland was really in danger the time the drink evil came back. They wanted the support of the organisation to end that evil, and generally, restore order.

We are informed by clergymen who know rural County Galway and the habits of the people intimately that the young men of to-day do not drink to intoxication, but they have acquired more dangerous habits in certain areas: they “soak” drink for long periods at a time, and their addled minds are, therefore, open to any suggestion of mischief or evil, whilst their power to do honest work such as strong clean men glory in is dulled.

Inevitably, demoralisation follows. We trust that this tale of degeneracy is exaggerated, but we very much fear that it is too true. The fact that Mr. de Valera should make public reference to it at the Ard-Fheis is significant.

“Half the mischief,” a well-known clergyman informs us, “is hatched out at cross-roads public houses by men who spend hours there when they might be doing honest work at home.”

It is well that the country should be aroused immediately to this most insidious of all dangers, for if alcoholic demoralisation should spread, then of a surety the road to utter demoralisation and ruin would be a speedy one to travel, and all the best traditions of our Irish manhood would soon be undermined.

Although we do not, and never have, advocated total abstinence against temperance, better a thousand times that we should lose altogether the liberty to touch intoxicants than that our young men, and, alas, also some of our women, should be reduced to the degrading level of “soakers”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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