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Connacht Tribune

Crystal ball-gazing through political smoke and mirrors

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Donald Trump...D-Day has arrived at last.

World of Politics with Harry McGee – harrymcgee@gmail.com

The problem with the future is it hasn’t happened yet – and still we persist in taking out our precise scientific instruments, our high-powered computers, our algorithms and calculations and predict what’s going to happen later this year.

So what’s on the agenda for 2017? A general election? Putin invading the Baltics? China going broke? Civil war in Turkey? Marianne le Pen becoming President of France? Ruth Coppinger cracking a joke in the Dáil?

The only possible way to respond to that is to use the great catchall West Kerry expression, “Ni Fheadar”. Rough translated it means “I don’t know and I don’t really particularly care.”

Politics is often the playing pitch where the expected gives way to the bizarre – as we saw last year with Donald Trump and with Brexit.

Can we see more of it this year? Of course we can.

Everybody has been predicting a general election here but it may not happen. Nobody predicted an election in the north and that’s what we have been lumbered with. Only ten months after the last election.

The DUP and Sinn Féin have jointly ruled the roost for ten years but their support has arguably waned a bit.

The paradox is, if there has been a drop it will be halted, and perhaps even reversed in this election, despite both bearing responsibilities for the Assembly crashing to a halt.

The DUP is primarily responsible for the crisis because of its disastrous renewable heat incentive with its crazy grants.

The wanton waste of public money has caused ripples of anger across the North, even among its supporters, and has damaged the party.

On the other side of the coin, did Sinn Féin run home with the ball on too soft a pretext?

The DUP could have walked during the Jean McConville controversy or the sex abuse allegations that arose within republicanism but chose not to. Why did Sinn Féin not hold out for a public inquiry instead and why did make an issue of the (stricly unrelated) Irish language Léargas grant?

This crisis wasn’t about equality; it was about governance.

Both parties have powerful motivations. Many suspect that Sinn Féin saw straws in the wind (with the help of poll data) suggesting this was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for them to grasp the big prize and become the largest party in the North.

The knowledge that this will probably be Martin McGuinness’s last time leading the party into an Assembly election will be a powerful galvanising force.

For the DUP, the negative will be the imperative. Put us in to keep them out. It might not work and not alone might we see direct rule but also a unionist party being relegated into second place.

So much for Theresa May being a Remainer. She delivered a speech on Brexit this week that confirmed that Breixit will be as hard as granite.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Connacht Tribune

O’Donnellan & Joyce celebrate 40 years in business

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Staff from O’Donnellan & Joyce celebrate 40 years in business

When O’Donnellan & Joyce started in 1982, little did they know that one day they would be celebrating 40 years in business. Celebrating the big 4-0 in September meant this has been a landmark year for the company.

In the beginning back in 1982 they worked mostly in lettings and private treaty sales. Their auctions began in 1984 on the Aran Islands with the sale of land and a pub.

Colm commented: “It is definitely one of my highlights over the past 40 years, everyone needs to start somewhere and it was a fabulous start.” The auction was held outside in the summer and is a far cry from the auctions held today.

These days O’Donnellan & Joyce ‘Wild Atlantic’ property auctions which take place in Galway’s Harbour Hotel, are renowned throughout Ireland, with properties for sale from Galway up to Donegal and all along the western seaboard right down as far as Kerry and over in Dublin.

Modern technology now means their auctions can reach a global audience with their live stream online bidding platform attracting international bidders as well as national and local bidders who can now bid and view the auction from the comfort of their own homes leading to a dramatic expansion of audiences across the world in recent years.

Combining modern technology with nationally renowned auctioneer Colm O’Donnellan taking bids on the day, brings tremendous excitement to the live auction room.

Not only do O’Donnellan & Joyce have their successful auction department, they also have a substantial new homes division, their private treaty department which sells on average over 350 homes a year, rentals division and their rapidly growing commercial & valuations department.

Like most businesses, it is the people who make the business. O’Donnellan & Joyce has 16 full time staff with many of them there for over 20 years.

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Connacht Tribune

Meeting hears of “devastating impact” of Huntington’s on families

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Patricia Towey, Huntington's Disease Association of Ireland; Minister of State Anne Rabbitte and Chairperson Thomas Lillis at the Shearwater Hotel, Ballinasloe for a members meeting of HDAI. Photo: Andrew Downes, xposure.

The Minister of State for Disability at the Department of Health has acknowledged the devastating impact which Huntington’s Disease has on the entire family.

Galway East TD Anne Rabbitte met with families affected by the disease at the Huntington’s Disease Association of Ireland annual meeting in Ballinasloe.

The Minister spoke positively about her intention to ensure families affected by HD will have access to necessary services and that family carers, who often care for several family members, have assistance.

She acknowledged the vital need for HD specialist support in the community to overcome the misunderstanding and stigma associated with the disease over generations.

The Minister also confirmed her priority to fully resource at least four of the seven required community neuro-rehabilitation teams around the country.

A member of a family affected by HD in County Galway said: “It is very encouraging to have Minister Rabbitte speak at our meeting to acknowledge the huge struggles families face.

“Huntington’s Disease desperately needs more recognition, more specialist support and more awareness from healthcare professionals; policy makers; and the general public.

“As children we grew up watching our Dad help care for Mum and just a few years later he had to start over with my older brother.

“Now my sister has symptoms and it is an ongoing struggle to get her the care and support she needs. HD families can overcome the fear and stigma associated with this disease if we know there are sufficient resources to ensure health and social care professionals can understand and help,” he said.

Huntington’s Disease affects the body’s nervous system – the network of nerve tissues in the brain and spinal cord that co-ordinate your body’s activities. This leads to progressive deterioration – physically, cognitively, and mentally until the individual becomes dependent on the help of others. Symptoms include motor (movement), mental health (for example mood) and cognitive (for example learning and thinking) disturbances, which in the majority of cases appear in mid-adult life.

Approximately 1,000 people in Ireland live with symptoms of HD or with the altered gene that triggers the disease. There are more than 3,000 people nationwide who are living at risk of developing the disease and hundreds of family carers left to struggle without adequate supports.

Despite the impact on families, from one generation to the next, there is little awareness of the condition and very limited specialist services. Unlike most other European countries, Ireland has no specialist multidisciplinary services or HD specialist nurses. By comparison, Scotland, with a similar-sized population have 10 regional multidisciplinary clinics with a team of 19 HD specialists offering outreach support throughout the country.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Concerns over day care move

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St Brendan's Community Nursing Unit in Loughrea: day care services have moved to the Loughrea Hotel.

Day care services at St Brendan’s Community Nursing Unit – which have been suspended for the past 18 months – have re-opened at the Loughrea Hotel.

Services restarted on Monday following a lengthy search for a suitable premises, and expected to continue operating from the hotel for around 18 months while an existing building on the St Brendan’s campus is “repurposed” by the HSE.

However, at least one local councillor has expressed concerns that the same level of services will not be available at the hotel.

At the beginning of the pandemic, the Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) ordered the closure of day services at St Brendan’s, so that the space could be used by permanent residents of the nursing unit for dining and activities such as cooking and baking.

Local area councillor Michael ‘Moegie’ Maher said that between the hotel and St Brendan’s hospital, a day care service will now be available on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, with the capacity to serve 86 people every week.

“The service is vital to Loughrea and East Galway. Everyone was very disappointed to see the day service suspended. We all have neighbours and friends who use the service and this was a vital lifeline for them, allowing them to socialise with others, to have a lovely meal together and to have any minor medical issues dealt with.

“I’m delighted that a suitable premises has been found in Loughrea town, which has been the traditional location for the service and also offers users a chance to avail of other services in our local town. The Loughrea Hotel is the perfect location with all of the necessary services on site and is easily accessed by the service users”, the Fine Gael councillor and Cathaoirleach of Loughrea Municipal District said.

However, Independent councillor Geraldine Donohue raised concerns about the level of services that will be provided and said she had been asked by constituents how much the temporary service was going to cost.

“I believe that HIQA should have been challenged from the outset for our purpose built Seven Springs Day Care Centre to remain at St Brendan’s. As far as operating Day Care Services from the Loughrea Hotel, I have concerns that the services that the attendees enjoyed at Seven Springs will not be available at the Loughrea Hotel,” she said.

Meanwhile Galway East TD Ciarán Cannon said HSE management are also planning to repurpose an existing building on the St Brendan’s campus to establish a permanent home for the day care service.

He said he had attended a site meeting recently to identify potential buildings on the campus.

“We now need to begin developing a permanent home for the service at St Brendan’s as it makes sense from so many perspectives to have the service on campus.

“At our site meeting we walked the campus and have identified a number of potential locations. The HSE’s building management team will now create a shortlist of locations and ultimately a decision on the final location will be made in consultation with staff.

“The intention is to partner with the Topping Trust, a local charity, to create a state-of-the-art day care facility at St Brendan’s to open in the shortest possible timeframe. We are all working towards that outcome and there’s a serious sense of urgency attached to the project,” said Deputy Cannon.

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