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CITY TRIBUNE

County and provincial champions dig deep to book place in All-Ireland final

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There are all types of performances that catch the eye but the secret of Corofin’s continued success is that they have this innate ability to dip into their locker and, whatever is required, pull out the one that best suits the occasion.

A man down following the sending off of full-forward Martin Farragher after just a minute at O’Connor Park, Tullamore on Saturday, the mindset was clear. The buzz words began to ring. Composure. Patience. Keep ball . . . Defend. Counter . . . Turnover, turnover, turnover.

While Corofin have produced far more swashbuckling displays over the years – none less than in their All-Ireland club victories in 1998 and 2015 – Saturday’s effort has to rank among their finest efforts, given the circumstances and obstacles they faced from the outset of this fixture. To play practically the entire contest a man down speaks volumes for the culture of their squad.

“Yeah, given the circumstances (it was a great performance) but we are just hugely relieved to be back in a club final again,” beamed man of the match and full-back Kieran Fitzgerald after the final whistle.

“After losing Martin so early on, all credit to our lads, they knuckled down and everybody stuck to the plan. It wasn’t a great game of football – we missed quite a bit and I am sure they did as well – but it is funny. You prepare for a lot of things and at the end of the day it still comes down to heart and stuff that you can’t really prepare for. You either have it or you don’t.

“In fairness, our lads showed guts there. They tackled and they harried. There were some super turnovers. That is just pure guts and heart and a will to try and win a ball. You can’t really train that. Our lads were super. It is probably a game that won’t live long in the memory for the neutral but it is our avenue back to a club final and we are delighted.”

He paid particular tribute to the work the likes of Ronan Steede and Michael Farragher did around the middle of the park – epitomising work-rate and composure. “They are class at that. They are super when you need time on the ball.

“Moorefield were eager to win the ball back and they were rushing up, and rushing tackles, and our boys were just drawing the ball and slipping it off which was super. It was a tough, tough game.”

For more, read this week’s Galway City  Tribune.

CITY TRIBUNE

Elective surgeries cancelled at UHG as overcrowding continues

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Galway Bay fm newsroom – Some non-urgent elective surgeries are being cancelled at UHG in a bid to tackle severe overcrowding at the city hospital.

It follows the issuing of a warning from the Saolta Hospital Group that the emergency department is extremely busy and there is ongoing pressure on bed availability.

General Manager at UHG, Chris Kane, says over 500 people presented at the hospital on Monday and Tuesday.

She says the overcrowding situation is very serious, particularly in relation to the ED, the Surgical Unit and the Acute Medical Assessment Unit.

Members of the public are urged to only attend the hospital in the case of emergency, and contact their GP or out-of-hours service if their health problem is not urgent.

Saolta is also reminding the public that the Injury Unit at Roscommon University Hospital is open from 8am to 8pm, 7 days a week, to treat adults and children over 5.

Speaking to Keith Finnegan on Galway Talks, Chris Kane said the current level of patients presenting is extremely high and “unusual” for this time of year.

She also noted there’s also been a rise in patients being treated for Covid-19, including in the ICU.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Mercury hit 30°C for Galway City’s hottest day in 45 years

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune –

Wednesday was the hottest day in the city over the past 45 years when with a high of 30.1 Celsius being recorded at the NUI Galway Weather Station.

The highest temperature ever recorded in the city dates back to June 30, 1976, when the late Frank Gaffney had a reading of 30.5° Celsius at his weather station in Newcastle.

Pharmacists and doctors have reported a surge in people seeking treatment for sunburn.

A Status Yellow ‘high temperature warning’ from Met Éireann – issued on Tuesday – remains in place for Galway and the rest of the country until 9am on Saturday morning.

It will be even hotter in the North Midlands, where a Status Orange temperature warning is in place.

One of the more uncomfortable aspects of our current heatwave has been the above average night-time temperatures and the high humidity levels – presenting sleeping difficulties for a lot of people.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Property Tax hike voted down in Galway City

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – A proposal to boost Galway City Council coffers by half a million euro every year by increasing Local Property Tax (LPT) did not receive the support of city councillors.

Councillor Peter Keane (FF) failed to get a seconder at this week’s local authority meeting for his motion to increase the LPT payable on Galway City houses by 5%.

Cllr Keane said that the increase would net the Council €500,000 every year, which could be spent evenly on services across all three electoral wards.

It would be used to fund services and projects city councillors are always looking for, including a proposal by his colleague Cllr Imelda Byrne for the local authority to hire additional staff for city parks.

The cost to the taxpayer – or property owner – would be minimal, he insisted.

“It would mean that 90% of households would pay 37 cent extra per week,” he said.

Not one of the 17 other elected members, including four party colleagues, would second his motion and so it fell.

Another motion recommending no change in the current rate of LPT in 2022 was passed by a majority.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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