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CITY TRIBUNE

Council has gone to pot over flower power back the West

Dara Bradley

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Bradley Bytes – a sort of political column by Dara Bradley

First it was Galway flags; now it’s the humble hydrangea that is getting up the nostrils of City Hall officials.

Regular readers will recall how Galway City Council threatened the Bon Bon Summer Shop opposite Salthill Promenade with fines of up to €12.7 million, if it didn’t remove from its roof a maroon and white flag with silhouettes of Galway GAA stars Joe Canning and Johnny Heaney.

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column with Dara Bradley 

The temporary ‘pop-up’ shop – which has been selling seaside classics like buckets and spades, beach balls, and plastic windmills for 21 years – was also told to remove its wares from outside the store. Bon Bon owner, Joe Quinn labelled the planning enforcement letters as “ridiculous”; and that was the opinion of most people, too, as the Galway City Tribune story caused quite a stir.

The furore has died down since, but the Council’s enthusiasm for rigorous enforcement of planning regulations shows no sign of abating.

The Daisy Bowl Florist is a new business that sells quirky plants and flowers on William Street West and is a welcome addition to the area, bringing new life and a splash of colour to an empty unit.

Its manager has been issued with a ‘notice of offence’ by the Council, for having floral displays outside the premises; and no, they’re not blocking the footpath.

The local authority doesn’t get-tough on derelict buildings in the city, that could perhaps contribute to a solution for the homeless crisis and housing shortage. And it doesn’t get-tough on illegal parking on double yellow lines and on footpaths and in disabled parking bays.

Instead, the powers that be on College Road have threatened a florist back the West with fines and imprisonment for displaying a few potted cherry tomato plants outside her shop window.

Does Tom Connell, Director of Services for Transportation, Recreation and Amenity and Corporate Services, who signed the notice, have nothing better for doing; and how many more city centre businesses have been served with similar notices?

 

Loughnane is still an ordinary Joe, Marie

Joe Loughnane, the People Before Profit local election candidate cracked a rare smile at the latest Galway City Joint Policing Committee (JPC) meeting.

 

For more Bradley Bytes, see this week’s Galway City Tribune 

CITY TRIBUNE

€46,000 Lotto winner comes forward as deadline looms

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Galway Bay fm newsroom – The Knocknacarra winner of the Lotto Match 5 + Bonus from the 12th of December has come forward to claim their prize, just two weeks before the claim deadline.

The winning ticket, which is worth €46,234, was sold at Clybaun Stores on the Clybaun Road on the day of the draw, one of two winners of the Lotto Match 5 + Bonus prize of €92,000.

A spokesperson for the National Lottery say we are now making arrangements for the lucky winner to make their claim in the coming days.

Meanwhile, the Lotto jackpot for tomorrow night (27th February) will roll to an estimated €5.5 million.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Voice of ‘Big O’ reflects on four decades

Denise McNamara

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – The daytime voice of Big O Taxis is celebrating four decades in the role – and she has no plans to hang up her headset any time soon.

Roisin Freeney decided to seek a job after staying at home to mind her three children for over a decade. It was 1981 when she saw an advert in the Connacht Sentinel for a dispatch operator.

The native of Derry recalls that the queue for the job wound its way past Monroe’s Tavern from the taxi office on Dominick Street.

“There was a great shortage of work back then. I nearly had a heart attack when I saw the line of people. My then husband who was giving me a lift in never thought I’d get the job, he was driving on past and I said, let me off.

“I got it because I worked as a telephonist in the telephone exchange in Derry. But I was terrified starting off because I hadn’t been in the work system for so long.”

Back then Big O Taxis had only 25 drivers and just a single line for the public to book a cab.

“We had an old two-way radio, you had to speak to the driver and everybody could listen in. It was easy to leave the button pressed when it shouldn’t be pressed. People heard things they shouldn’t have – that’s for sure,” laughs Roisin.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of Róisín’s story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Baby boom puts strain on Galway City secondary schools

Stephen Corrigan

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – A baby boom in the late 2000s has left parents of sixth class pupils in Galway City scrambling to find a secondary school place for their children next September – with over 100 children currently facing the prospect of rejection from city schools.

The Department of Education is now rushing to address the issue and confirmed to the Galway City Tribune this week that it was fully aware of increasing pressure and demand on city schools

Local councillor Martina O’Connor said there were 100 more children more than there were secondary school places for next year, and warned that this would put severe pressure on schools to increase their intake numbers.

“This will put a lot of pressure on schools because they will have been working out the number of teachers and what resources they would need in October or November last year and they could be facing a situation where they will be asked to take an additional eight or 10 students.

“There would normally be a small excess – maybe two or three – but this year, it’s over 100. There is a bigger number of children in sixth class this year and there will be the same issue for the next few years,” said the Green Party councillor.

A Department spokesperson said while there were capacity issues, factors other than numbers could be at play, adding that there were approximately 1,245 children in the city due to move onto secondary school in September.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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