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Bradley Bytes

‘Come back for good, Ciarán, all is forgiven!’

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Recent traffic problems in the city have left councillor Ollie Crowe (left) pining for the traffic management days of Ciaran Hayes (right).

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column by Dara Bradley

Come back Ciarán Hayes, all is forgiven: That appears to be the message from Fianna Fáil City Councillor Ollie Crowe.

Stop sniggering down the back of the class. Yes you, you messer.

Oliver is not joking; he’s deadly serious – he’s pining after Ciarán Hayes.

We kid you not.

Like the lead vocalist in boy band Take That, Ollie was singing for Ciarán: “Want you back, Want you back for good”.

Ollie reckons the place has gone to pot since Ciarán left for pastures new in Sligo.

This is the same Oliver Crowe who in a fit of rage once declared that the City Council – of which Ciarán Hayes was a leading member – “couldn’t run a bath”, never mind run the city.

But like everything else, it seems Ollie has only just discovered, as the song goes: “You don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone.”

Ciarán Hayes, you will recall, was the director of services for Infrastructure and Transportation (T&I) at Galway City Council before he took a plum job as the head honcho of the local authority up in Sligo.

Ollie reckons the T&I department at City Hall is missing Ciaran’s input. He even blamed traffic chaos recently on a lack of joined-up thinking in T&I.

“Hayes wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea,” said Ollie, in what must be contender for Bradley Bytes Understatement of the Year Award, “but he knew what he was at”.

Ollie was unhappy recently that unnecessary gridlock was caused because five separate roadworks were not co-ordinated by the City Council.

“It was pure chaos . . . It wouldn’t have happened if Hayes was here,” said Ollie.

Maybe he’s right. Maybe it wouldn’t have happened. But didn’t the traffic chaos and fallout from the changeover of Moneenageisha Roundabout to traffic lights happen on Ciaran’s watch?

Next Ollie will be telling us he wants former City Manager John Tierney, now head of Irish Water, to come back, too!

For more, read this week’s Connacht Sentinel.

CITY TRIBUNE

Galway 2020 defenders’ mortifying muscle memory 

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Bradley Bytes – a sort of political column with Dara Bradley

It’s amazing how quickly people try to re-write history. If Galway 2020 happened, say, 20 years ago, you could maybe blame fading memory to make allowances for the maroon-tinted glasses of those who defend it to the hilt.

But Galway’s term as European Capital of Culture concluded not 20 weeks ago, and the ‘see no evil, hear no evil’ brigade are out in force with propaganda that would make Donald Trump blush.

The defenders of Galway 2020 usually fall into two categories. There are people who work or worked for the organisation directly or indirectly and/or who contributed to winning the prestigious designation. And there are those who are deluded. Some fall into both categories – deluded and with a vested interest in Galway 2020’s reputation.

It matters not that the latest criticism of the ill-fated – and extremely expensive – project was contained in an official Government report, compiled by an office with impeccable credibility, the Comptroller and Auditor General.

Be it bar-stool commentary or analysis of the CA&G, the reaction to criticism is always the same. The defenders metaphorically stick index fingers in both ears, close their eyes and chant: “Yada, yada, yada, blah, blah, blah”. This would be fine if it wasn’t the taxpayer who’s had to pick up the tab.

It’s like the defenders of Galway 2020 have an inbuilt muscle memory. They’ve spent so long defending Galway 2020 that, no matter what the new charge is, their memory system automatically kicks in.

And while the muscle memory that instinctively compels them to defend is, through repetitive use, as sharp as ever, their actual memories are mortifyingly short. Or maybe they’ve selective memory. Or both.

The few – and they’re getting fewer – who defend Galway 2020 often spout the narrative that but for the Covid-19 pandemic it would’ve been brilliant.

And to a casual observer, someone who never heard of Galway 2020 and its litany of problems from day one, maybe that explanation seems plausible. But the argument does not hold water.

The C&AG last week highlighted how Galway 2020 had planned to raise €6.8 million from the private sector. This figure was used in the bid book to persuade judges to give Galway the designation.

In the end, it managed to raise just €400,000 in cash, plus €500,000 in “in-kind” support.

Defenders’ muscle memory kicked in and they said, “Ah, but the pandemic, how could you raise money during Covid?”.

This deliberately ignores Galway 2020’s own bid book, which promised to raise €4 million from the private sector pre-Covid in 2017, 2018 and 2019. It didn’t materialise, which shows the projected income from businesses was overinflated, or the private sector had reservations about supporting this project long before Covid.

This is just one implied criticism in the C&AG report, which doesn’t even mention the non-appointment of a Business Engagement Director, whose job – if the appointment had proceeded – would’ve been to tap the private sector for money.

Maybe the defenders should read the C&AG report. It might help to de-programme their mortifying muscle memory.

(Photo: The scene at South Park at the same time as the Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture opening ceremony).

This is a shortened preview version of Bradley Bytes. To read more, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Colette’s cycling ‘cabal’ puts ruling pact in peril 

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Bradley Bytes – a sort of political column with Dara Bradley

Danger here! Galway City councillors, not a month back from summer recess, and already the ruling pact is in peril of falling apart. Or as one wag put it, “it’s in tatters – again!”

Unsurprisingly, plans for a temporary cycle-lane along the Salthill Prom are causing friction.

Or, rather, the decision by the ruling pact – or some members of the ruling pact – to opt not to have a debate about those plans at last Monday week’s Council meeting has caused ructions. The fall-out continues.

Having read the previous Friday’s Galway City Tribune, where journalist Denise McNamara had elicited all 18 Councillors’ views on how they intended to vote on the cycleway motion, Mayor of Galway, Colette Connolly (Ind) called a Zoom meeting of councillors. Not all of them though, just a select few.

It took place prior to the official City Council meeting, but excluded two councillors in the pact – Independents Terry O’Flaherty and Donal Lyons – who had indicated to the Tribune that they would be voting against the Mayor’s motion.

Cllr Niall McNelis (Lab) had splinters lodged in his backside from sitting on the fence when he told the Tribune that he would be abstaining in the vote; he too did not receive an invite to Colette’s cosy cabal.

As it transpired, Terry and Niall voted for the Mayor’s motion, and Donal stuck to his guns and voted against.

What has irked them, though, is they were not invited to the Mayor’s unofficial pact meeting by virtue of the views they had expressed in this newspaper days before the vote.

Former Mayor Mike Cubbard couldn’t make Colette’s cabal but it’s understood the others – Fine Gaelers and Greens – were there. The excluded trio felt that it was decided by the ‘pact within a pact’ to vote for the Mayor’s motion without debate. Not very democratic.

To make matters worse, at least two councillors who are not in the pact – including one from Fianna Fáil – was invited, while the trio who voted for Collette to become Mayor were excluded.

The King of Knocknacarra, Lyons, is miffed and has threatened to walk from the pact. McNelis, who had to hold his nose when backing the former Labour councillor to become First Citizen, confirmed he was considering his position, too.

“I’m deeply, deeply disappointed and I’ll be seriously considering my position with the pact. For a Mayor that preaches to the rest of us about transparency, and about how to run meetings, to turn around and exclude me and others from a meeting; to exclude people who supported her is deeply, deeply disappointing,” McNelis told us.

A bit rich from someone whose loyalty is best summed up by the nickname his colleagues gave him, ‘Three Pacts’. But he has a point. And with Donal nearly overboard, Owen Hanley outside the circle and Niall contemplating his position, the pact is in peril – again!

(Photo: Labour Cllr Níall McNelis who is “deeply, deeply” disappointed’ at being excluded from a meeting organised by Mayor Colette Connolly on the Salthill cycleway debate, says he’ll be “seriously considering” his position in the Council’s ruling pact)

This is a shortened preview version of Bradley Bytes. To read more, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council axes arts grants in the ‘Capital of Culture’

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Bradley Bytes – a sort of political column with Dara Bradley

The amount of money awarded by Galway City Council in arts grants this year has been cut by about 6%.

Some €425,000 was distributed to arts organisations last year, when they were late receiving their cheques.

This year it has been confirmed that the grants will total €400,000 or €25,000 less than in 2020, when Galway held the Capital of Culture title.

Cynics might say that the extra 6% in funding last year was thrown at arts organisations in order to keep them quiet about the delay in distributing the funding.

Now, the local authority has reverted to the pre-2020 figure, not that you’d know from the press release issued by City Hall last week.

Funding to some groups was cut by half. Galway Choral Association is down €1,000 to €1,000; Galway Art Club is down €500 to €500; and An Taibhdhearc is down €1,000 to €1,000.

Brú Theatre lost 33% of its City Council funding, down by €1,000 to €2,000. Druid also took a €1,000 hit and was allocated €28,000 for 2021.

Macnas has suffered the biggest cut – it’s down by €5,000 from €24,000 last year to just €19,000 this year.

It was not all cuts. Westside Arts Festival was among the groups that got more money this year – up €600 to €3,000. But axing the overall allocation of arts grants is not a clever move by the local authority of a city that benefits so much off the backs of artists’ endeavours.

(Photo: Gilgamesh, a Galway 2020 commission by Macnas, which has had its arts grants cut by the City Council).
This is a shortened preview version of Bradley Bytes. To read more, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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