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On cloud nine: sky’s the limit for members of Galway Flying Club

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Carey Flying Club

Lifestyle with Judy Murphy –  Experienced pilots take the  sting out of cost by taking  newbies under their wing 

There is something strangely soothing about looking down over Galway City from the confines of a four-seater Cessna airplane, even if the small craft is being buffeted by winds that are unusually strong for this time of year.

The views over the city, Galway Bay and the surrounding countryside are glorious – the Docks look incredibly neat and well laid out, while the contrast between the boggy land to the west of the city and fine farmland to the east can be seen in a totally new light. As for the sea, with apologies to James Joyce, this great whirling pool of ‘snot greenness’ is a sight you’d never get to see from the shoreline or even a boat.

It is for views such as these, and for the sheer freedom offered by flying that members of Galway Flying Club are contented to sit in their clubhouse at Galway Airport on a wet and windy Sunday morning, waiting for the weather to improve, so that they can take to the air.

It’s a sociable clubhouse, with a plenty of tea, freshly brewed coffee, scones, fruit cakes and the Sunday papers. Some members are chatting, others such as chief instructor Cormac Carey are catching up on paperwork – flying might be a hobby for these people but it’s one that is highly regulated for obvious reasons of health and safety.

Flying is often regarded as an expensive pastime and while it may not be as cheap as knitting or painting, it’s doesn’t have to strap you financially, according to club member JP Randles, who is currently working towards getting his Private Pilot’s Licence (PPL). He points out that members come from all walks of life – farmers, heart surgeons, taxi drivers, teachers and mechanics – and from many nationalities.

JP, who works as an engineer with Covidien Medical Devices in the city, has family responsibilities and work commitments, so he is happy to work for his licence over a two-or three-year period, which makes it financially easier.

There is an initial fee of €600 to join the flying club, similar to a golf club and for similar reasons. There are hangars and two aircraft to be maintained because without planes, it’s difficult to run a flying club! That one-off fee gives a person a share in the club, once they pay annual membership of €295.

Annual membership covers insurance, maintenance and clubhouse costs as well as subsidising the hourly fee for flying the aircraft, which is €160. That’s to cover the running costs of the plane, and most of it goes on aviation fuel, says JP.

You need some 45 hours of flying time to sit for a pilot’s licence, but these hours can be built up over several years, JP explains. So, once you can budget, it is possible to follow your heart’s desire over, say, a three-year period.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Mayor of Galway, Cllr Michael Smyth, turning the first sod of the new £86,000 community centre at Shantalla on August 6, 1971

1921

Treatment of women

At the meeting of the Galway Board of Guardians on Wednesday, Mr. Pk. Thornton in the chair, a discussion took place regarding the admission of women with illegitimate children.

Mr. Cooke said that it was one of those questions which the Dáil Éireann was trying to solve. The assistant clerk said that Galway was only a small place in comparison to other places.

A member said that these people were coming in month after month, and it was perfectly scandalous.

Mrs. Young said that the practice should be stopped as in England. The assistant clerk said that they had laws of their own in England in regard to this matter. Mrs. Young said that it was a matter that the guardians should go into.

Clerk: So these women assist in washing and scrubbing, Mr. O’Toole?

Master: Yes, they do.

Mrs. Young: Until you tackle the thing, you can never make much headway. The nuns were terrified by some of them who absolutely refused to work.

Mr. Cooke: They should be cleared out.

Chairman: It is not fair for any able-bodied woman to be in the workhouse at the ratepayers’ expense.

The clerk said that this question was one of the most difficult which had confronted Dáil Éireann, and they were looking the matter up.

Profiteering black spot

Galway is the blackest spot in Ireland for profiteering. It is maintaining its inglorious record in extortion – a record that all but killed the race meeting some years ago and diverted the stream of visitors from the town for nearly a decade.

If this flagrant profiteering continues, it will have the result of reducing the city ultimately to poverty, whilst the few grow rich. The economic balance must be maintained. Elsewhere desperate efforts are being made to maintain it.

Prices must come back. Labour in Galway has done absolutely nothing to bring them back, because Labour in Galway appears to be less intelligently led than elsewhere. Yet unemployment is rife amongst us, poverty is already knocking consistently at the door of not a few, wages are falling and must fall.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

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Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Connacht Tribune

Overcoming obstacles thrown up by pandemic

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Founder of Stepping Stones low-cost counselling clinic, Chelsie Daly. Her book is called Covid-19 and Ever Changing Life.

Fashion, beauty and lifestyle with Denise McNamara

Many workers have returned to the office this week for the first time since Covid-19 flattened our population.  Of course there will be those rejoicing at the prospect of getting out of the house, milling with other humans and being able to grab a coffee that’s not from your own kettle.

But no doubt it is a daunting prospect for a sizeable proportion of the workforce.

After so long isolated from friends, family and regular routine, returning to an enclosed space with others who are not obliged to be vaccinated can be frightening.

As psychotherapist Chelsie Daly explains, many of us who never struggled with our mental health continue to experience feelings that are difficult to process.

“I have found that Covid-19 has affected everyone of us. I have noticed an increase in anxiety among my clients due to the ever-changing reality of the past year and a half. It was difficult to adapt to lockdown and once we learned how to do that we are returning to life as it was before, which has also increased anxiety in many of us,” she reflects.

Chelsie, 26, set up a low-cost counselling service in Glenrock Business Park in Galway City called Stepping Stones in 2018. It started as an outlet to share information and meeting peers for coffee and walks. While completing her masters in 2019 it grew into a practice with five therapists, offering sessions costing €40.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Country Living

We should never have doubted Orwell in his ‘1984’ predictions

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

AS old fogeys go, I am, up to a certain point, reasonably comfortable with the basics (well the ‘very basics’) of technology. I work on a Dell computer, I have an iPhone, I like looking up weather charts on the different sites, but I’m still a little perplexed with the notion that almost every move I make can be watched by someone out there in the ether.

A friend of mine, who changed his phone relatively recently, could show me his movements on a particular day from a couple of years back, and I have always wondered why some advertisements which might be of special interest to me keep appearing on my screen when I’m looking up something.

I also remember being quite ashamed back the years to admitting that I was the owner of a mobile phone. Somehow, it seemed to indicate that I had risen above my station in life, so it was only used on very limited occasions, and hardly at all in public.

That old Fordson Major of a phone that I first owned did though, here and there, have its uses. There was a day down by the river when I needed someone to plug out the electric fence at the home base, and there was just unbounded joy at being able to ring from the waterside, get through, and be able to work away without having to walk back to complete that chore.

In fairness to the old Nokia (or was it a Motorola?), she was quite a trusted friend. On one occasion, it fell from the tractor, split into a number of different pieces, but still worked again when all the bits were put together. It didn’t really matter that in half the places I went to, there was either zero coverage or the feeling that the person at the other end of the line was millions of miles away, which I think has led to a habit that I’ve never quite kicked, namely that of shouting into the phone.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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