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Country Living

Charting the course ahead for the challenges of 2019

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

Well, it’s that time of year again, when the fool’s alphabetical guide to help you tiptoe your way through 2019 is presented, and I can guarantee that it’s not ‘cut and pasted’ from last year’s edition. All tips are copyright of the author!

A is for anger management, especially when it comes to such complex little dilemmas as the search for lost keys, mobile phones, glasses, wallets and screwdrivers. The acid test for good anger management is being able to refrain from spewing out a series of expletives when you realise that the missing mobile has been left on silent.

B is for trying to box clever in tight financial situations when you know that the money being spent is greater than what’s being earned, with little prospect of any change to the situation. Mr Micawber’s recipe in Dickens’ David Copperfield for happiness just ‘ain’t no good’ in those type of situations: “Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen [pounds] nineteen [shillings] and six [pence], result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.”

C is for all the clichés that us journalists tend to use when we’re too lazy to come up with some original wordage. So straight from the horse’s mouth, and in a nutshell, we will ask the powers that be in the world of journalism to think outside the box. At the end of the day, there’s no point locking the stable door after the horse has bolted. Phew . . . downright awful . . . oh sorry, I meant the bottom of the barrel!

D is for all those moments of daftness that we are prone to, like putting diesel into a petrol car; or trying to out-sprint a Limousin heifer in an open field; or in breaking the back tail-light of the car when backing into a low-lying bollard on  city streets. Trying to take a mobile phone out of a trouser pocket while driving also comes under this heading.

E is for the easing of our life’s worries and realising at long last that we are purely finite creatures who really shouldn’t look that far ahead. As Benjamin Franklin is credited with saying: “In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” So, to assuage our long-term concerns, maybe just a matter of taking things one day at a time.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and  county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Country Living

A vassal of technology in a world of strange gadgets

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

You really know that life is passing you by when you read something in the newspapers about a piece of high-tech equipment – which has never touched your life    experience – that is being discontinued.      Last week, there were various bits and pieces in the papers about the demise of the iPod, with all the grieving obituaries recalling the various windows of happiness that this little device had given them in their lives.

There may at times, over the past 21 years since its introduction in 2001, have been one, or maybe two, occasions when a stray thought entered my mind that I should consider the purchase of an iPod.

Friends of mine, who are into music, boasted about its capacity for holding thousands of songs in an electronic pouch that would fit in the palm of your hand and input high-fidelity sound into your ears.

Once, around 30-years ago, I had contemplated the purchase of a Walkman, but instead about a decade later, I purchased one of those tiny transistor radios which would fit into the top pocket of a shirt and keep me informed on local, national and world affairs.

Apparently, from reading what knowledgeable people know about these gadgets, the iPod over two decades was a real ‘game changer’ from Apple, who at the time were struggling to hit the right note in that rather strange world of music and technology.

Somewhere, along the way I lost my longing (or thought I had) for new gadgets, after ‘breaking the bank’ in the mid-1970s to buy a Toshiba tape recorder and a Playmate transistor radio, the latter having the rather wondrous facility at the time of being used with either battery or mains power.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Country Living

Little by way of ready relief from hypochondria ailment

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

Not all the time, but here and there, I get occasional nominations for being the number one hypochondriac in my immediate circle, an ‘accolade’ I hotly dispute but often to no avail. There is always that tendency when a sudden headache arrives or a twinge in the back comes like a lightning strike or a cough starts out of the blue to straight away harbour thoughts of impending doom.

With the passing of years – even decades – you get subtle hints of your finitude (a fancy way of saying that you’re going to die sometime) and you begin to check out medical terms like floaters (little black spots that appear in your line of vision), cataracts, osteoarthritis, diabetes, depression and of course the dreaded dementia.

If you can tick off more than two of those boxes then you know that you’re in a bit of bother and the only hope is that if you tick them all, you’re probably just in a state of chronic hypochondria rather than being on your last legs.

Luckily many years ago after a brief flirtation with cigarettes while at school (secondary), some kind of a spirit descended upon me and prompted me to turn my back on the dreaded weed, which has now become horrendously expensive as well as killing you off before your time.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Country Living

Learning to accept that we’re going to live in a perfect world

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

So, we’ve gotten over the hullabaloo about cutting a bit of turf and selling a few bags here and there to a neighbour or relative . . . or have we? It is kind of hard to figure out, but in the Irish political world of nods and winks, apparently there’ll be ‘no notice taken’ of people cutting a bit of turf for their own use and putting a trailer or two on the market.

What a fuss about nothing. In the great world of Google, I looked up how much fuel a Boeing 747 Jumbo Jet burns on one of its journeys.

The figures are quite astonishing. Ever hour that The Jumbo is in the air, she burns 10 or 11 tonnes of fuel. So, over a seven-hour spin that equates to roughly 75 tonnes of aeronautic fuel. To put it another way, during every second of flying, one gallon of fuel is burned up.

When I sit back and think about this, it just puts a sense of perspective on what’s being going on in our little ‘cabbage garden’ (borrowed from Lord Haw Haw) over recent weeks.

I’m not for a minute suggesting either that we start banning 747s from our skies, but it just shows the scale of what fuel is being burnt off on our planet every second of every minute of every hour that passes.

While Ryanair’s Michael O’Leary mightn’t be everyone’s cup of tea, at times he just says things as they are. Of course, he has a massive, vested interest in the travel business, but a couple of weeks back on radio, he asked the simple question of how as an island nation we could survive without our network of air links. The simple answer is of course that we couldn’t.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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