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Connacht Tribune

Chamber outlines Galway’s benefits in post-Brexit era

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At the launch of Galway Chamber's brochure Why Galway? aimed at potential business investors at the Irish Embassy in London were Niamh Costelloe, General Manager, Galway Techbology Centre; Conor O'Dowd, President of Galway Chamber of Commerce; Greta Mulhall; Ambassador Dan Mulhall; and Breda Fox, Head of Enterprise at Galway Local Enterprise Office

Galway Chamber launched a programme to attract inward investment from the UK and further afield with two events in London last week.

The Irish Embassy hosted an evening function for a delegation from Galway and invited guests from the business community in London at which Galway Chamber’s new brochure ‘Why Galway?’ was launched.

The following day the action moved closer to the heart of the financial district with a reception at the offices of Keltie LLP at 1 London Bridge, overlooking the Thames and The City of London.

The aim of the programme is to build on the work done by IDA Ireland – which attracts investment to Ireland – and encourage businesses to come to Galway rather than other locations in the country.

“We are acutely aware of the importance of foreign direct investment to Galway.” says Conor O’Dowd the outgoing President of Galway Chamber.

“While we have had significant success in attracting multinational companies, we are committed to ensuring that Galway remains a wonderful location to run a business, to work and to live. Our mission here is to deliver this message to key influencers in London and is the first of several such engagements over the coming years”.

Ambassador Dan Mulhall said that smaller locations such as Galway need to make sure they tell their stories well in order to attract investment away from Dublin, Cork, etc.

“Areas around Ireland that have something special to offer, like Galway, can’t assume that everyone looking to invest in the country knows what makes them special,” he said.

“Galway has a huge amount to offer in terms of its location the quality of life and the people, its academic institutions as well as a critical mass of industries. This story needs to be told to the right audience”

The Galway Technology Centre and the Portershed at the Galway City Innovation District organised the trip with Galway Chamber and both were identified as key elements for the success of this strategy.

“Overseas companies want to be able to grow quickly once they decide on a location and having the ability to make a ‘fast landing’ is key to this”’ says Michelle Conaghan, Head of Emerging Business UK and Europe at IDA Ireland based in London.

“Galway is fortunate to have facilities such as the Galway Technology Centre and Portershed to ensure that this can happen.”

Keltie is well placed to judge how well Galway performs as a business destination. The London-based company specialises in intellectual property law and took the decision to set up an Irish operation a week after the UK voted to leave the EU.

‘We took the decision to open in Galway because it fits with the technologies of the clients we love to work with, it’s full of creative people and above all else it has a massive amount of energy’” says Sean Cummings, a partner in Keltie LLP’s London office and now head of its Irish operation.

“That energy creates change, innovation and a start-up culture, all of which give rise to business opportunities for a company like ours.”

The Chamber plans to build on this launch with a digital version of its Why Galway? brochure which will contain more case studies, video and a lot of the hard data needed by prospective investors to help make business decisions.

It’s envisaged that this message will be brought to key centres of investment potential in Europe and North America in the next 12 months.

Maurice O’Gorman, the incoming President of Galway Chamber, says: “We realise that we need to do this for ourselves. We cannot always rely on the national government to promote Galway.”

“We need to get the Chamber, local government, local development agencies, real estate and the educational institutions working together to promote Galway. This has been a great start and we need to do a lot more of this to ensure Galway continues to grow.”

Galway Chamber also launched a brief video to complement the brochure. See the video here.

Connacht Tribune

Remembering the rough and tumble of open-air festivals

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Dave O'Connell
Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

One of those public relations puff pieces – admittedly sent out on behalf of a mattress manufacturer who might just have a vested interest in sleep – offered a series of suggestions by which those attending outdoor music festivals this summer might be assured of a restful night.

That conveniently overlooks the fact that no one ever went to a weekend music festival in search of a good night’s sleep; indeed, for some any form of shuteye qualifies as proof that things didn’t go as well as you might have hoped.

Which means that the suggestions of these ‘sleep experts’ might have to be taken with a small pinch of salt – after a shot of Tequila at sunrise if you’re a real music head, of course.

But for what they’re worth, the experts suggest you bring an eye mask, use ear plugs so you can tune into a relaxing podcast, and take a nap during the day.

Alternatively, you could always stay at home because the rough and tumble of a weekend in a tent on a boggy field might not be for you. Instead pull up a comfy chair and watch Glastonbury on the BBC.

Even as it is, those festival-goers who think they’re roughing it don’t know the meaning of the word; unless you were in Lisdoonvarna in the eighties, you have no idea what getting back to basics is all about.

Equally the modern outdoor music festival involves a field or a park in the middle of a city, to which you can take the LUAS and your picnic basket, secure in the knowledge that the concert licence means you’ll be on your way towards home by around half ten.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

The only thing Boris Johnson actually believes in is himself

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Boris Johnson...clinging on despite all the odds.

World of Politics with Harry McGee

This is a column that is a little bit about a political question – and a lot about how political leaders manage to cling on to power. The political question is the Northern Protocol, and the leader clinging on – despite all the odds – is, who else, but Boris Johnson.

How he has managed to stay in 10 Downing Street defies all precedent. Many of his predecessors have fallen on their swords for much, much less.

Since becoming Prime Minister, Johnson has careered from crisis to crisis, disaster to disaster. When it was agreed by the EU and the UK, he hailed the Northern Ireland Protocol as a triumph.

As the Prime Minister he ousted, Theresa May, reminded him in the Commons this week when she was speaking of his low stock among international leaders: “Actually, I suspect they are saying to themselves why should they negotiate in detail with a government that shows itself willing to sign an agreement, claim it as a victory, and then try and tear it apart in three years’ time?”

That’s a good question. Johnson is now trying to destroy something he partly created. And the litany of other contradictions run deep. He spent weeks going around the place joking about Covid, shaking hands, and downplaying its seriousness. Then he caught it and almost died from it.

The number of deaths in Britain from Covid were among the highest, pro rata, anywhere. It would have downed another leader. But not Johnson.

In fairness, the British were the first to come out with mass vaccinations even though the decision to extend the time period before the first and second jab was not a great one in retrospect.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Move sought on scheme to promote growing of catch crops

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Stephen Canavan: Scheme needed on catch crops.

THE Dept. of Agriculture has been urged to ‘move swiftly’ and introduce an incentive scheme for the growing of ‘catch crops’ this Summer to help any potential Winter feed shortages.

Galway IFA Chairman, Stephen Canavan, told the Farming Tribune that such a scheme would be easy to introduce and would incentivise farmers to grow catch crops such as rape and kale.

“These crops would provide a high-quality feed for stock during the early Winter period and would also give farmers the opportunity to reseed land for next year,” said Stephen Canavan.

He said that while the Fodder Support Scheme (FSS) would be a welcome help to farmers, more assistance from the Dept. of Agriculture would be required to ensure that there were no feed shortages over the coming Winter season.

Fast growing catch crops – such as rape and kale – can be sown in mid to late Summer and still be ready for feeding by the early Winter period.

However, last week, National IFA Chair, Paul O’Brien, hit out at the EU Commission for delivering ‘mixed messages’ in terms of their policy on farmers producing more grain and fodder crops.

He said that while last month, the EU were encouraging farmers to grow more crops for feed, they were at the same time pressing ahead with proposals for reductions in the use of pesticides – essential for crop protection.

“Commissioner Wojciechowski was explicit when he addressed our National Council last month: ‘the EU Farm to Fork policy will have to be re-visited in light of food security concerns.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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