Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Lifestyle

Cathy set to light up Arts Festival in Matchbox

Published

on

First flight of the SkyWhale, over Mt Arapilies, Western Victoria, Australia. Image courtesy ACT Government / Centenary of Canberra.

Lifestyle – Judy Murphy previews the exciting line-up of the Galway Arts festival including homecoming of local actor

She’s one of Ireland’s finest actors, who regularly graces the stage of the Abbey Theatre, has appeared in films such as Philomena and is currently working on TV3’s much praised series Red Rock.

Now Galway City woman Cathy Belton will make her Arts Festival debut this July in Frank McGuinness’s one-woman show The Matchbox, which is being directed by Joan Sheehy. This Festival production marks the Irish premiere of The Matchbox, which was first staged in Liverpool Playhouse in 2012 when critics described it as ‘compelling’ and ‘sharply and simply involving’.

The Matchbox, about a mother’s desire for revenge on the people who have killed her child, will run for the duration of the two-week Festival, explains the event’s director Paul Fahy. Frank McGuinness draws on ancient Greek tragedy for this play, set on Valentia Island and based around events which occurred in Liverpool 12 years previously.

“I couldn’t put the play down,” says Cathy Belton of this story about a smart young woman of Irish extraction who sees her future changed by an early and unplanned pregnancy. She copes well with what life throws at her – until her daughter is gunned down. That tragedy gives rise to her actions as “she moves through bereavement into something else”, explains Cathy.

The Matchbox is being directed by director, writer and actor Joan Sheehy who has worked closely with Frank McGuinness in the past and, says the Arts Festival’s Paul Fahy, “this is the dream team for Frank”.

Far more controversially, from South Africa’s Third World Bunfight comes Exhibit B, which addresses Europe’s colonial past in Africa. Theatre meets installation in Exhibit B at the Black Box as it examines the atrocities which were committed and concealed by European powers in Africa as they colonised the continent in the name of progress. This promenade piece uses the notion of the 19th century freakshow, or human zoo to present 13 different scenes, each with live, motionless, performers who identify themselves as being black. Each performer depicts an example of the suffering that was inflicted on individuals by the European colonisers, continuing right up to the current times and European treatment of immigrants.

Exhibit B, which features a live band from Namibia, has played at festivals all over Europe, winning praise for its unflinching approach to racism and colonialism.

But there have also been protests, amid accusations that this show is racist, and it was forced to close in London’s Barbican Centre last September because of these. However, Brett Bailey of Third World Bunfight, defending the project, said it was made with “love, respect and outrage . . . against the hate of racism”.

Dance will take centre stage at this year’s Festival with the return of the UK based Hofesh Shechter Dance Company. They will present three pieces, Cult, Fragment and Disappearing Act. The final work, Disappearing Act, is completely new while the other two are older pieces which have been reworked, says Paul Fahy. Hofesh Shechter made their Galway Arts Festival debut in 2010 when they presented the powerful show, Political Mother at the Black Box. That’s also the venue this time.

Druid Theatre will host the Irish premiere of Luck Just Kissed you Hello, written by Amy Conroy and presented by Dublin’s HotForTheatre, whose previous work includes I ♥ Alice. This new piece about a transgender character transitioning from male to female is “a funny three-hander”, says Paul Fahy and was presented as an in-development piece at last year’s Dublin Theatre Festival. It will run for the two weeks of the Festival.

Cleggan actor and director Olwen Fouéré, whose one-woman show, Riverrun, has been a hit from London to Adelaide since it premiered at the 2013 Festival, returns with a new show. Lessness was written by Samuel Beckett in 1969, the year he won the Nobel Prize for Literature. This production will fuse theatre and visual arts, and like Riverrun, it will be co-produced by Galway International Arts Festival and the Emergency Room in conjunction with Cusack Productions. It’s opening in London’s Barbican next month as part of the International Beckett Festival and will then come to Galway where it will be at An Taibhdhearc for two weeks.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Vitamin D and good postural balance may help as we age

Published

on

Health, Beauty and Lifestyle with Denise McNamara

Having just turned 50 aging is particularly on my mind this month. So two recent studies about aging peaked my interest which are worth sharing. The first is a study from the University of South Australia and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It is based on data from 294,514 participants from the UK Biobank, a biomedical database with half a million British participants.

Scientists found that in some populations, up to 17 per cent of dementia cases could be prevented simply by raising people’s vitamin D in the blood to 50 nmol/L, which is considered to be the normal level.

Dementia affects over 55 million people worldwide and every year 10 million new cases are diagnosed so the implications could be huge.

It is the first time the impact of very low levels of vitamin D are examined on the risks of dementia and stroke by using genetic analyses among a large study population.

There is widespread vitamin D deficiency among people worldwide, even in sunny regions where sun awareness campaigns, indoor living and other factors contribute to the low vitamin D levels,

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Rev Fr Raymond Watters O.P recites a decade of the rosary as the rain begins to pour down during the Blessing of Galway Bay on August 15, 1882.

1922

Dawn surrender

National troops operating from Galway and Athenry at dawn on Wednesday morning surrounded an area about four miles between Liscananaun village and Aucloggeen, on the eastern side of the Corrib, and after a smart movement captured nineteen irregulars, with their officers, twenty-two service and Mauser rifles, a number of service revolvers and automatics, and considerable quantities of ammunition for bombs.

The National troops were under command of Co-Commandant Austin Brennan, O.C., Galway area, and the various battalion and company officers, and the plan to surround these villages, which lie in a marshy waste between the Curragh Line, or Galway-Headford road, and the main road from Galway to Tuam, was evolved after information had been received that a number of irregulars were quartered there, and were commandeering sheep and foodstuffs from people in surrounding districts.

Slowly and silently, accompanied by a Lancia armoured car on which machine guns were mounted, the National troops moved out from Galway shortly before two a.m. on Wednesday. One column took the Galway to Headford road, the other taking the Tuam road.

The column operating on the Headford road swung to the right beyond the Cregg river, taking the road to Drumgriffin. By dawn they had taken up extended formation in the woods around Cregg Castle, and this formed a trap into which the irregulars were subsequently driven.

Trade unions position

Mr. Cathal O’Shannon, T.D., in his presidential address at the Trade Union Congress on Monday, declare that organised Labour was separate from and independent of any political party, and would take no dictation from any quarter outside its own ranks.

He strongly protested against militarism, from whatever quarter it came, and condemned the political censorship of thought and opinion, the ignoring of laws relating to the custody of prisoners, the existence of a semi-military police force, and the propaganda on both sides.

The present conflict or strife, he declared, was unnecessary and counselled the Irish workers to keep aloof from it.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Country Living

Trying to find the time to slow down that clock

Published

on

Country Living with Francis Farragher

AS one gets older the realisation dawns that time – and not material wealth – is our greatest asset but boy does that clock fairly freewheel around with each passing year.

Anytime a conversation switches around to the question of: “How long is such-and-such a person dead,” the guesstimate answers usually need to be doubled. Looking back on time makes us all realise how fast it is flying by.

I always contend that winning the lotto – as exciting and all as that would be – would not make any of us one second younger and in all probability would not add on one day to our eventual date with destiny.  In fact it might even know a few years off if we lost the rag and went mad with the lucre.

My late father used to have a favourite saying about wealth and money namely that while it wouldn’t necessarily bring you happiness in this world it would ‘help you to enjoy your misery’.

Even a couple of Sundays back while sitting in the Hogan Stand and witnessing Galway’s gallant attempt to win the All-Ireland title, it was kind of hard to credit that 21-years had passed since we were last in a senior final and 24-years since we ended a 32-year famine with the victory over Kildare in 1998.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending