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Country Living

Can the printed word survive in tech world of instant news?

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A Titanic newspaper story of the early 20th century.

Country Living with Francis Farragher

I suppose that I am from an era where newspapers were always part of the weekly literary diet in our house. As a child the Tuam Herald could never be missed; the Connacht Tribune would have been a more intermittent purchase; while my father had a little penchant for the Evening Herald during the 1960s when it often opted for the quirkier type of news items.

There used to be talk of the odd heathen here and there who had access to The News of the World and very occasionally a second-hand copy of that publication would find its way into our kitchen, hidden away but not well enough to avoid the curious eyes of a 10-year-old on the verge of prurience.

The News of the World did have coverage of all the big soccer matches across the water but of course all the saucy stuff was contained in the front and inside pages where the low morals and the fetish ways of our UK cousins were exposed in ‘glorious’ black and white.

Now and then, there was even talk of the local Parish Priest having got word of this ‘rag’ being sent by post to a particular house and having a ‘little chat’ with the purchaser about the moral error of his ways. Maybe it was the postman who ‘spilled the beans’ but at least in one instance, word had it, that the clerical intervention did not work and was robustly fended off.

One way or another since the time of the French Revolution (and before), newspapers – or the Fourth Estate – have been part of our lives, and for some of us, who ply our trade in the printed word – and made a half-decent living out of it – there are of course growing concerns over whether newspapers can survive the technology avalanche of instant news, information and images.

Old-fogies like myself would like to believe that newspapers can survive into the future, and when I have the time, there is nothing more I enjoy than sitting down and enjoying reading a good story, a decent gripe, a column that stirs the senses, or maybe a descriptive piece about a great sporting occasion.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Country Living

‘For better or worse’ it’s a case of ‘til death do us part

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

It doesn’t happen too often but every now and again when I leave the mobile phone behind me on the desk after leaving for home or realise that a change of jacket or pants has robbed me of this link with the good and bad of the planet, I wonder how did we ever manage without them.

I was a reluctance inductee into the ranks of the mobile believing at first, they were a serious sign of someone believing that they had risen above their station. Even on the farm, there was always merit in having a good knife in your pocket (for practical purposes of course such as cutting the twine off a square bale), but mobiles in their early days did not have a macho ring to them.

They still annoy me greatly at times such as when suddenly awakens from a little doze on the armchair and the resultant escape from the chair sends the mobile flying across the floor but thank God for an otter cover which has proven to be much indestructible.

There are the times when the mobile needs to be retrieved from a trouser pocket in the middle of a car journey and in the end a large dose of patience is required to stop the vehicle and stretch out before rescuing the device from its ridiculous location in the first place.

When it rings 15 minutes into an early night of sleep, it’s hard not to utter a few expletives before grudgingly pressing the answer button and I’ve never quite forgiven the device for wakening one Friday night, just at the time of the Late Late Show quiz result, when I thought I had landed the jackpot.

Alas, it turned out to be a familiar voice on the phone asking me if I had heard the news that some elderly acquaintance had moved on to more heavenly pastures. But at least for about 20 seconds in that world between sleep and awakening, I had imagined hearing the voice of Ryan Tubridy asking me how I intended to spend the €20,000 cash prize.

Then there’s the scam callers that I seemed to get a rash of a couple of weeks back telling me to ring social protection as a matter of urgency or informing that I had won some international lotto which required a phone call back to verify.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Country Living

Never fun when one animal is isolated from rest of the herd

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No man (or woman either!) is an island.

Country Living with Francis Farragher

A few weeks back one of the heifers strayed from the herd and made an opportunist visit into a neighbour’s field. She wouldn’t have been known for her rambling ways, but a gap in the wall compliments of a windy night, presented the opportunity of a visit and the red heifer couldn’t resist the temptation.

All year, she had been a very reserved member of the small herd with pretty close to impeccable behaviour . . . well that is by the standards of any athletic Limousin.

The day of reckoning came when she had to be brought home after her wanderings and, in the process, isolated in a pen before being loaded onto a trailer.

Isolation did not suit this beast. From being a perfectly settled member of the herd (whether it be her own or the neighbour’s), she transformed into something of a raging bull when isolated on her own.

Only for the solidity – and height – of the neighbour’s pen, she definitely would have made her escape but when she was returned to her own gang, civility was restored, and she barely raised her head the next evening when the daily count and inspection was made.

It made me wonder about social interaction not only in the bovine world but in the space us humans occupy as well.

I don’t know how many times over the past few months I’ve remarked that, ‘I haven’t seen such-a-one for ages’, but of course there have been ‘such-a-ones’ all over the place for the best part of the last two years.

Admittedly, our escapes from Covid ‘house arrest’ have gradually evolved into more prolonged and less restricted   interactions with other humans (I hope I’m not tempting fate!) but still, a face that hasn’t been seen for a year or two, seems strangely unfamiliar.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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Country Living

One of the real joys of winter: hot soup on a cold evening!

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A time to savour the more relaxed pleasures of winter

Country Living with Francis Farragher

So, it has happened, and we have to get on with it . . . winter, at least in terms of darkness if not weather, is upon us – with journeys to work now requiring full headlights; torches with dead batteries having to be replenished; and a little bit of a chill returning to the early mornings even though we haven’t really got any harshness from November just yet.

In a strange kind of way, when the time changes and the acceptance grows that our ‘longer days’ are just memories, there can be a certain calmness about winter. After all, if you doze off on the couch at around 8pm, there’s no feeling of guilt that you should be outside, involved in some kind of gainful work or exercise in the great outdoors.

For some reason, I’ve always found the transition period of September and October to be that trifle more mournful, maybe because we realise that another summer has passed and that our brighter days are gone for another season.  For those of us on this side of the great Atlantic Pond, that will always be autumn, but the Americans always refer to it as The Fall.

The origins of that latter title, though, are apparently not of American creation. The use of ‘The Fall’ term for those later transition months of the year can be traced back to the 1600s and 1500s and is, in all probability, linked to the departure of the leaves from the trees through September and October, another great irritant as we try to keep paths and driveways reasonably tidy.

I could be ‘on the side’ of the many great poets who were always touched by the beauty of Autumn, like John Keats, who wrote so beautifully about the ‘season of mists and mellow fruitfulness’ being the ‘close bosom friend of the maturing sun’ but as the light declines and the suns slips lower into the sky, I find it a more difficult time than normal to keep up the spirits.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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