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Aladdin’s Cave props shop takes a vintage turn

Judy Murphy

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Lifestyle – Judy Murphy visits a magnet for lovers of all things vintage and antique – and meeting needs of screen and stage

Anybody with the slightest interest in vintage and antique clothes, accessories, furniture or household goods, could happily get lost in Tríona Lillis’s premises at the Liosban Estate in the city.

This is a space that, like its owner, defies easy description. That’s partly because there are two businesses here. One is Props and Vintage, a venue that hires out props and costumes to film, TV and theatre companies, and the other is a shop that sells vintage clothes, furniture and other items to the public.

The shop, entitled A Stór, opened a year ago in the ground floor of a warehouse in Liosban (off the Tuam Road). It grew out of Props and Vintage, which Tríona set up with a colleague from the world of film design two years ago.

And if some of the items on the shop floor look familiar, it’s because they have appeared on popular TV programmes such as Poirot and Marple as well as in films such as 2012’s Woman in Black, starring Daniel Radcliffe and Ciaran Hines.

Tríona’s partner in Props and Vintage is Jim Grindley, a London based props master for film and TV, who works on period dramas set in the mid 20th century, including Marple and Poirot, and many pieces here – from sofas to umbrellas – originally dressed those programmes.

Clare-born Tríona, meanwhile, has headed up Macnas Theatre’s costume department for the past seven years and also works with other theatre and TV production companies.  She designed the costumes for 1916: Seachtar Dearmadta, currently showing on TG4 and was set designer on Mephisto’s recent production of Eclipsed at the Town Hall. 

Tríona also styles comedian Tommy Tiernan for his shows. Although he’s doing stand-up rather than acting, it is a performance, she says, and he wants clothes that him feel comfortable on stage. Their professional relationship stretches back years and she will also be working with him on his new series for Sky TV.

The idea to open a hire shop, catering for film and TV companies came about because Tríona and Jim had accumulated a range of period pieces through their work.

 “Everything here has been in a film or TV show,” explains Tríona, pointing out the rocking chair from Women in Black. It sits alongside clearly labelled boxes containing everything from jugs to men’s vanity cases to ladies’ wallets and umbrellas. In another room there’s a selection of vintage luggage, including the suitcases used by David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in Murder on the Orient Express.

 

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Country Living

It’s taken a while to purge the ghosts of our past life

Francis Farragher

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1960s Ireland: Far different times at school than today. Photo courtesy of Irish Times.

Country Living with Francis Farragher

A few years back, I was overwhelmed by a huge wave of enthusiasm to go on things like Twitter and Facebook. There was a novelty about it but one day the penny dropped that maybe there were other and better things to be doing with my life. An issue also arose when I thought I was sending a ‘message’ on my mobile only to discover a few minutes later that I has sent it to ‘half-the-country’ via Twitter.

Still technology and social media is the way of the world that we live in at present and it is extremely useful to stay in touch and find out at the click of a keyboard or the touch of a phone some key piece of information. ‘Ould hacks’ in the trade like myself, are trained to double check things from a couple of sources, and that’s a great help, in never believing the first piece of scary news that you see on social media.

Any journalist worth his salt will try and reliably establish if something stands up or not, and key question always to be asked about something or someone can be summed up in one very short sentence: “Is this true.” So, whether we’re journalists in local papers, local radios, RTE, the Irish Times or Independent News and Media, that basic tenet of our profession – to establish the truth – must always be the guiding principle. Something akin to doctors and the Hippocratic Oath.

There are various little free offers of news from reputable sources that can be accessed by a daily email such as WebMD which will tell you every way you can try and avoid the common cold as well as keeping your muscles limbered up, or the New York Times newspaper, who will email you a daily briefing of world news at 6am every morning, not that I’m at my desk at the unearthly time of the morning.

The daily snapshot of news from the New York Times would make you wonder about what kind of country America is, not that we should be too surprised after four years of one D. Trump and all his antics. And he’s not finished yet!

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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Participants in the Eucharistic Procession pass through Eyre Square on June 20, 1965.

1920

Unparalleled turmoil

Even the long and tear-stained history of Ireland can find no parallel for the terrible happenings of the present week. Nearly forty people have come to violent and sudden deaths.

Sunday’s tragedies in the Irish capital and the sequel at Croke Park might well drive men who hope for, and long for, peace to utter despair. But courage is the quality that is required to-day, not despair – moral courage to point the path to peace and just dealing between man and man.

We live in the twentieth century of civilisation – though the surge of horrors that surround us might make it difficult to realise that fact – and God is in heaven. His Commandments still hold, though some of his people may forget them for a time. It is the duty of all men in authority to recall them so that the terrible passions of our time may subside and that a Godly peace may once more be promoted in our midst.

The tragedy of Father Griffin’s death stuck us more nearly than anything that has happened even in these days of horror. He was God’s anointed, the servant of the Prince of Peace. By the tradition and practice that governs all Christian peoples, he should stand as a man apart from the vengeful passions of the multitude.

During the recent riots in Londonderry, the one fact that lit up a sordid picture with a flame of light was that the violent mobs on both sides held their fire whilst the priests crept out from the side of the streets to succour the wounded, to console the dying.

And Fr. Griffin dwelt amongst us for two years. The little children of our streets knew him, and in many respects he was like unto one of these. All life lay before him in the most sacred, if not most responsible calling, that man can enter.

This was the man of whom the ghastliest story since the days of Cromwell has to be told. All who have hearts have been touched, all who have tears have shed them by his bier.

The funeral

Amidst scenes of most profound public sympathy and inspiring devotional expressiveness the remains of the late Rev. Michael Griffin were solemnly laid to rest beneath the shadow of the eastern wing of the Cathedral in Loughrea on Wednesday.

That feeling most intense has been aroused all over the county by the shocking tragedy was painfully in evidence. Nothing that has ever happened in the county in modern times has wounded the public conscience in such a way.

Popular to a degree, the deceased young priest was a man of much promise, full of personal charm and affability. The events of Wednesday will live long in the history of his native diocese. The position of his last resting place is one which must always attract the notice of the visitor.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Connacht Tribune

Giving new life to ancient stories

Judy Murphy

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Mark is passionate about folklore and history.

Lifestyle – Mark Joyce shares his passion for Irish myths and legends in a new book which he has written and illustrated. A companion piece to his previous work on Ireland’s mythical beasts, Ireland’s Mythical Wonders is a treasure trove of heroic figures, magic events, and occasional forays into madness. He tells JUDY MURPHY how it came about.

While most of us moan when rain falls, Mark Joyce embraces bad weather. It’s the one time you can stay indoors, happily immersed in books without feeling guilty about neglecting any work that needs doing outside, the Recess man says cheerfully, during a deluge of Biblical proportions.

Mark, an artist by training who owns the renowned Joyce’s Craft Shop in Recess, loves books of all sorts, but has a particular passion for Irish history and heritage.

In recent years, he has taken that ‘grá’ and created his own illustrated books, the latest of which, Mythical Irish Wonders, has been just published by Currach Press.  Mark describes the colourful hardback book as “a companion piece” to Mythical Irish Beasts which Currach published two years ago.

Mark, a graduate of the Dún Laoghaire College of Art and Design who also has a background in film, concentrated on fantastical creatures from Irish mythology for that first book, which he also illustrated. Some were familiar while others were less well-known – he brought them to life for a new generation.

While he was researching Mythical Irish Beasts, Mark stumbled across a range of smaller, fantastic pre-historic tales. “I’d never heard of some of them before and they were really cool,” he explains.

Individually, these ‘wonder stories’ were too small to merit individual books, “but too important to be forgotten”, he says.

These included information about how to become an Irish warrior, the location of the gates of hell (Roscommon), how a chieftain’s sword could also make rainbows, and Ireland’s magic trees. Mark decided to compile these miniature treasures into a new collection that would transport readers into another space and time.

The result is Mythical Irish Wonders, a hardback book with 49 stories, similar in design to Mythical Irish Beasts. It has adventurous deeds from heroes such as Cú Chulainn and Fionn Mac Cumhaill as well as information on Celtic and pre-Celtic Ireland, including the various tribes that inhabited the country in pagan times. There’s also an account of the 14 different names given to the country, as recorded by 17th century historian, Geoffrey Keating.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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