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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Acne and angst on the way as the teenage years dawn at last

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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Date Published: 15-Mar-2011

Last weekend marked a major milestone in our house as our eldest became a teenager – frankly, with all the warnings I’ve had from parents who’ve been through this before me, I was expecting him to come home with an ASBO before the week was out.

There seems to be a sort of cycle of peaks and troughs to your average youngster’s life which begins with total dependency – but at least, because they can’t walk, they can’t cause you too much grief once they get enough food and sleep – through the terrible twos where you cannot take your eye off them or they’ll have either fallen down the stairs or stuck something up their nose.

Then there’s the trauma of school – trauma for you, that is; because they don’t mind at all – which gives way to the happy years when they’re old enough to communicate with you but largely in a positive way.

And then they morph into teenagers when they regress on the communications front, growling instead of speaking; and when they again spend most of their time lying down – only this time they’re on the iPod on the couch instead of lying in a cot.

The sense of anticipation is compounded by the fact that his younger brother is coming up fairly rapidly behind him to ensure these teenage years continue until 2017.

Stating the obvious, that’s our own fault because we bought into the notion that having children, like jail sentences, are experiences best served currently rather than consecutively – but as with shoes and school uniforms, the older one gets to go wear his teenage years first, breaking them in for the other fella.

Okay, so 13 isn’t exactly ‘trousers down at half mast’ territory or even those massive basketball runners where the laces for some reason never need tying, but it’s the first step to spots and real temper tantrums – as opposed to the mere hissy fits or tears of childhood.

Advance notice of this column, incidentally, brought an episode of foot stomping and head revolving, topped off with several loud groans to signify the insurmountable mortification that such attention is almost certain to bring.

But it’s hard to reconcile this growing lad, with the little being you one held in the palm of one hand, a tiny new-born utterly dependent on you for everything that keeps them alive.

These days, that dependence on you for everything to keep them alive revolves around money – lunch money, money for new runners, tracksuit bottoms, football jerseys and Dominos pizza.

Where once they held your hand on the way to school and ran to hug you on their way out, they now only acknowledge you if they’re looking for something – otherwise they would sooner walk out in front of speeding traffic than be seen walking with you on Shop Street.

Ahead of you lie the disco years (theirs; yours are over), the school tours to foreign parts, the girls (again, theirs; yours is your wife), the Buckfast and cheap beer, the Leaving Cert, College fees, the fact they don’t want to go on holiday with you but do want to go to Ibiza with their mates, the fact they want to live in a flat even though you can see NUIG from your front door – the fact that all of your money fuels their lives while the highlight of your night is when the key turns if they decide to come home.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway Bay FM News Archives

Galway ‘Park and Ride’ could become permanent

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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Date Published: 07-May-2013

A park ‘n’ ride scheme from Carnmore into Galway city could become a permanent service if there is public demand.

That’s according to the Chief Executive of Galway Chamber of Commerce, Michael Coyle.

The pilot scheme will begin at 7.20 next Monday morning, May 13th.

Motorists will be able to park cars at the airport carpark in Carnmore and avail of a bus transfer to Forster Street in the city.

Buses will depart every 20 minutes at peak times and every 30 minutes at offpeak times throughout the day, at a cost of 2 euro per journey.

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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Tuam awaits UK hay import as overnight rainfall adds to fodder crisis

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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Date Published: 09-May-2013

Tuam is now awaiting a third import of hay from the UK as overnight rainfall has increased pressure on farmers struggling to source fodder.

A total of ten loads are expected at Connacht Gold stores throughout the West with a load expected at the Airglooney outlet this evening or tomorrow.

Farmers throughout the county have been struggling to cope with the animal feed shortage and a below than normal grass growth due to unseasonal weather conditions.

Overnight rainfall in the Galway area has also added to the problem making ground conditions in many areas are quite poor.

Joe Waldron, Agricultual Advisor with Connacht Gold says farmers in short supply can contact the Airglooney outlet on 093 – 24101.

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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Transport Minister urges end to Bus Eireann strike action

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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on

Date Published: 12-May-2013

The Transport Minister is urging drivers at Bus Éireann to engage in talks with management, in an effort to bring their strike action to an end.

There were no Bus Éireann services operating out of Galway today as a result of nationwide strike action by staff affiliated with the national bus and rail union.

Up to 20 Bus Éireann drivers are continuing to picket outside the bus depot at the docks in the city this evening.

Drivers from other unions have decided not to cross the picket line and go into work today – causing the disruption to be even worse.

Bus drivers are protesting against five million euro worth of cuts to their overtime and premium pay – cuts which Bus Eireann says are vital to ensure the future viability of the company.

The majority of services nationwide are disrupted, and the union say strike action will continue until management are willing to go back into negotiations.

However, it’s not expected to affect school services next week.

Galway bay fm news understands that around 70 percent, or over 100 Galway bus Eireann drivers are affiliated with the NBRU.

 

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