Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Country Living

A season far removed from more innocent days of yore

Published

on

Advent author, Patrick Kavanagh, along with fellow-scribe, Anthony Cronin, in a scene from Dublin in the 1950s. Picture courtesy of the Irish Times.

Country Living with Francis Farragher

There was a time . . . alas many moons ago . . . when our primary school days would always be marked out by the holiday periods, and almost inevitably too by a visit from the local Parish Priest who would do a quick check on our knowledge of Christian Doctrine.

Thankfully, I have no unpleasant memories of those visits with the PP from Corofin, a man of kindly disposition and ailing years, always tending to ask the same questions, especially in the run-up to Easter and Christmas.

Often his pre-Christmas visit to the school would happen around the end of November, probably to coincide with the run-up to the season of Advent, an ‘event’ that we’d have been well tutored on by our Franciscan teachers, keen to ensure that our religious knowledge was at the tip of our tongues.

So, when the inevitable question would be asked by the PP in the dying embers of November about what was so special about this time of year, we’d all have our stock answers ready about Advent, and it’s time of preparedness for the arrival of the baby Jesus, about a month later.

We’d all have the same rhymes to blurt out and we’d be bursting a gut to ‘get there first’ with the replies, and in the process pick up some kudos from the teacher about how well spoken and smart we were about the arrival of Advent.

A little tale I heard last week prompted this line of thought when a teacher asked his class about what was the big event that was coming up around the end of November, one that would be a forerunner to the Christmas festival.

In my era, the standard answer would have been flooded with images of Advent and Christmas but in 2019, the reply was quite a different one. Kids being kids, the answer that they piped up, to a child, was: “The Toy Show”, and I suppose at least there was honesty and spontaneity there.

Our little lectures about Advent, despite being wrapped in a cloak of solemnity, still couldn’t disguise our anticipation that this season gave notice of Christmas not being that far away . . . with all its trappings of feasting, presents, Santa Claus and of course holidays from school.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Country Living

A stout defence of the humble sausage and its coat of ketchup

Published

on

Country Living with Francis Farragher

Alas, I’m of an age to remember when such things as ‘shop ham’, tomato ketchup, Chef sauce and flagons of Bulmers (cidona, I hasten to add) were all considered great treats on the few occasions during the year when they arrived in the storage cupboards of the colder rooms in the house . . . kind of DIY fridges that didn’t require any electricity.

A few weeks back, as I was extolling my lifelong love for ketchup and my refusal to ever eat chips without a consistent lathering of the red stuff (vinegar is also another essential) when I was gently chided by a colleague about my rather crass dietary leanings.

She told me that she would never let a container of ketchup inside her sauces receptacle, whether it be a glass bottle (always preferable) or one of those more girthy plastic containers. The basis for her antipathy was, that ketchup when applied to food, tended to wipe out all other tastes – her point being that it really was a case of ‘what you were having with your ketchup’.

Admittedly, I was initially rocked back a bit at being chastised for my love of ketchup and from somewhere – and in keeping with the current mood of the nation – the words of the Garth Brooks anthem, kept filtering into my head of: “I’ve got friends in low places.” At that point, I felt that I dare not mention such things as sausage sandwiches on white bread, greasy streaky rashers, tins of spaghetti or canned fruit.

There’s scarcely a day that I pick up a paper or magazine where I don’t read about some food that we shouldn’t eat anymore or another product that was supposed to be very bad for us but has now been discovered to have enzymes and bacteria that will keep my heart ticking for longer; maintain my brain at its most perceptive; and keep such horrible things as ulcers and dodgy gall bladders out of the pain arena.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Country Living

‘For better or worse’ it’s a case of ‘til death do us part

Published

on

Country Living with Francis Farragher

It doesn’t happen too often but every now and again when I leave the mobile phone behind me on the desk after leaving for home or realise that a change of jacket or pants has robbed me of this link with the good and bad of the planet, I wonder how did we ever manage without them.

I was a reluctance inductee into the ranks of the mobile believing at first, they were a serious sign of someone believing that they had risen above their station. Even on the farm, there was always merit in having a good knife in your pocket (for practical purposes of course such as cutting the twine off a square bale), but mobiles in their early days did not have a macho ring to them.

They still annoy me greatly at times such as when suddenly awakens from a little doze on the armchair and the resultant escape from the chair sends the mobile flying across the floor but thank God for an otter cover which has proven to be much indestructible.

There are the times when the mobile needs to be retrieved from a trouser pocket in the middle of a car journey and in the end a large dose of patience is required to stop the vehicle and stretch out before rescuing the device from its ridiculous location in the first place.

When it rings 15 minutes into an early night of sleep, it’s hard not to utter a few expletives before grudgingly pressing the answer button and I’ve never quite forgiven the device for wakening one Friday night, just at the time of the Late Late Show quiz result, when I thought I had landed the jackpot.

Alas, it turned out to be a familiar voice on the phone asking me if I had heard the news that some elderly acquaintance had moved on to more heavenly pastures. But at least for about 20 seconds in that world between sleep and awakening, I had imagined hearing the voice of Ryan Tubridy asking me how I intended to spend the €20,000 cash prize.

Then there’s the scam callers that I seemed to get a rash of a couple of weeks back telling me to ring social protection as a matter of urgency or informing that I had won some international lotto which required a phone call back to verify.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Country Living

Never fun when one animal is isolated from rest of the herd

Published

on

No man (or woman either!) is an island.

Country Living with Francis Farragher

A few weeks back one of the heifers strayed from the herd and made an opportunist visit into a neighbour’s field. She wouldn’t have been known for her rambling ways, but a gap in the wall compliments of a windy night, presented the opportunity of a visit and the red heifer couldn’t resist the temptation.

All year, she had been a very reserved member of the small herd with pretty close to impeccable behaviour . . . well that is by the standards of any athletic Limousin.

The day of reckoning came when she had to be brought home after her wanderings and, in the process, isolated in a pen before being loaded onto a trailer.

Isolation did not suit this beast. From being a perfectly settled member of the herd (whether it be her own or the neighbour’s), she transformed into something of a raging bull when isolated on her own.

Only for the solidity – and height – of the neighbour’s pen, she definitely would have made her escape but when she was returned to her own gang, civility was restored, and she barely raised her head the next evening when the daily count and inspection was made.

It made me wonder about social interaction not only in the bovine world but in the space us humans occupy as well.

I don’t know how many times over the past few months I’ve remarked that, ‘I haven’t seen such-a-one for ages’, but of course there have been ‘such-a-ones’ all over the place for the best part of the last two years.

Admittedly, our escapes from Covid ‘house arrest’ have gradually evolved into more prolonged and less restricted   interactions with other humans (I hope I’m not tempting fate!) but still, a face that hasn’t been seen for a year or two, seems strangely unfamiliar.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending