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2020 photo Competition extended to include Hurling finals

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A week's holiday for two in Croatia with Croatia Tours is the top prize in the Connacht Tribune's 'My Galway, My Culture' photo competition.

The Connacht Tribune and Galway 2020 have decided to extend the closing date of the ‘My Galway My Culture’ photo competition to celebrate Galway’s All-Ireland Hurling finals.

‘Hurling is such a big part of Galway’s culture it would be mad not to include the All-Ireland finals in the competition’, says Dave Hickey of The Connacht Tribune.

‘We know that parts of the city and county are painted maroon and that people have been very creative on how they show support for the hurlers.

‘We hope that the Liam McCarthy and Irish Press Cups return to Galway on Monday week and that will create even more opportunities for people to capture this unique part of our culture on camera.

Readers are encouraged to send in photos showcasing their support for the hurlers as well as photos taken on the day, whether in Croke Park or not.

Should the teams be successful then the celebrations and homecoming will be great opportunities to get some great images as well.

The competition, which has a top prize of a holiday for two in Croatia, has attracted almost 400 entries so far.

Entering is very easy. Simply go to www.ctrib2019.wpengine.com/2020photo and upload your photos there or email them to photos@ctribune.ie.

Photos must be taken between 1st July 2015 and the new closing date which is 5.00 pm on Wednesday 9th September.

The top entries will be exhibited at a special gallery at the Connacht Tribune Print Works at the end of September or early October.

The winners will be announced at a reception to open the exhibition.

The competition closes at 5.00 pm on Wednesday 9th September. Full terms and conditions at www.ctrib2019.wpengine.com/2020photo

 

Connacht Tribune

Tragic killing of Irish hero

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The wedding of Paddy O’Donohue and Violet Gore, in June 1919. Michael Collins was best man and Mary Healy was bridesmaid. Jack Buckley, a relation of the Whelan family in Shanaglish, is on the ground second from left. A relative of his gave a copy of this photo to Fr Patrick Whelan of St Patrick’s Parish in the city. Mary Healy was also related to the Whelans. The photograph is unusual as Collins is looking directly at the camera; something he avoided during the War of Independence.

Lifestyle – An unusual photo of Michael Collins, taken at a wedding during the War of Independence has strong Galway links. He’s looking straight at the camera, something he rarely did at a time when the British had a price on his head. However, it was his own people who killed Collins, 100 years    ago this month, as historian WILLIAM HENRY recalls.

A photo of Michael Collins, found 90 years after he was killed in an ambush at Béal na Bláth during the Irish Civil War, has family links with Galway.

It’s the wedding photograph of Paddy O’Donohue and Violet Gore who were married in June 1919, with the reception held in the Shelbourne Hotel. Collins was the best man and Mary Healy was bridesmaid.

The young man sitting on the ground second from the right is Jack Buckley. He and Mary Healy were cousins of the  Whelan family from Shanaglish, who have had  pub in south Galway for generations. Well-known city chemist Michael Whelan and PP of St Patrick’s Church in Galway City, Fr Pat Whelan, are members of that family and Fr Whelan was given a copy of the photo by a descendent of Jack Buckley.

The original photo was discovered by writer and broadcaster Dave Kenny in the attic of his Dublin home; it had been gifted to his grandparents by the newly-married couple, who were friends and fellow nationalists.

Violet Gore, a singer, had helped raise funds for the Irish cause through concerts in Ireland and England while Paddy O’Donohue, had been a leading IRA activist in Manchester and was a key figure in Collins’ network. The photograph is unusual because Collins is looking directly at the camera. That’s something  he avoided doing during the War of Independence, as he was a marked man with a bounty on his head.

According to Fr Whelan, the photograph was hung on a wall in the family home after the wedding and although house was raided, the Black and Tans didn’t realise that Ireland’s most wanted man was watching them.

Just a couple of years later, on August 22, 1922, during the Irish Civil War, Michael Collins was killed by his own countrymen in an ambush at Béal na Bláth, County Cork, the county in which he had been born on October 16,1890. He was 31 years old when he died.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Greening up the office can aid productivity

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Certain plants are better than others to pick for the office.

Fashion, Beauty and Lifestyle with Denise McNamara

I recall when a closely located colleague left our office, she took with her a lovely plant that had been a gift from her late father.  As well as lamenting the loss of a dear workmate, I missed that plant in my sightline for ages.  It was the only bit of greenery on our side of the office that looked out over high grey buildings.

I attempted to grow a plant or two on my desk over the years but nothing lasted. I don’t know was it the aircon in the summer and heat in the winter, but I managed to kill everything green with life.

While working at my kitchen table, I look out over the ivy-clad back shed and a few plants on the patio. From the kitchen window my eyes are drawn to several cherry blossom estates growing sideways in the green as I search for inspiration.

So it was with interest that I read about a new study into biophilic office design, or the act of bringing the outdoors into the work environment to the non-initiated.

Cacti, air plants, succulents and spider plants may be popular ways to brighten up desks and create a greener office space, but there are even more benefits to having plants in the office.

A survey on the topic revealed that plants in the office increase productivity by 15%. When considering air quality, workplace satisfaction and productivity in ‘lean’ offices versus ‘green’ ones, quality of life and productivity increased across the board.

Some 70% of people surveyed said plants helped improve the atmosphere at home and in the office, while 31% said greenery and plants helped them concentrate while working.

We know many people take to gardening to combat stress, so a green workspace can have a similar impact. The study concluded that plants in your home or office can make you feel more comfortable and relaxed.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Attendees at the Blessing of Galway Bay on August 15, 1982.

1922

A leader lost

“I have the greatest hope in the Irish people. But what we have got to learn in our public life is the merit of following the unpopular path. We have plenty of physical courage. Moral courage is what we need – and above all, we must develop.”

These words were spoken by President Griffith a few weeks before his death. They were words of inspiration, hope, instruction. They revealed the optimism that carried the man through the gloom of dark years, the discouragements of dangerous days and nights, until at last his bold spirit cleft the clouds, and showed the Irish people light.

They displace as in a flash that optimism that bore him through to triumph, that spirit that inspired all his acts, that courage that held him in the fairway when others wandered into by-paths, and the constructive genius that, had he lived, would have seen an Ireland even in his own day that could stand four-square every wind that blew.

O’Connell has been described as the Irish Liberator, the great tribune of his people. Griffith laid well and truly the foundations of a movement which won a greater triumph than O’Connell.

Local enterprise

Through the commendable enterprise of Mrs. Payne, Cross-street, the people of Athenry are at last provided with an amusement hall in which they can pass away many a pleasant evening.

The hall, the building of which has been recently completed, is a commodious one and can accommodate quite a considerable number. Already a well-known theatrical company has had an engagement at the new hall when there was a magnificent attendance each night – the entertainment being the right thing in the right place.

In a few weeks’ time this company will return with a greatly enlarged array of artistes, when the townspeople will be treated to something they will not forget.

Practice dances will be held on Sunday evenings, and there is a suggestion to secure the services of a qualified teacher of Irish dances to bring up the rising generation with a knowledge of Irish step-dancing.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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