Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

CITY TRIBUNE

2,000 caught for speeding in Galway over five-month period

Published

on

More than 2,000 motorists were ‘done’ for speeding in Galway City in the first five months of the year – an almost 10% increase on the same period last year.

Figures released to the City Joint Policing Committee (JPC) show that some 1,836 fixed charge penalty notices (FCPN) were issued for speeding between January and May 2020, rising to 2,001 this year.

Councillors have raised concerns about the location of ‘Go Safe’ speed detection vans, with Cllr Mike Crowe (FF) hitting out at the practice of parking them on footpaths.

His party colleague, Cllr Alan Cheevers (FF) said there was a particular issue with the location of one speed van that is regularly parked on the Monivea Road.

“In relation to the Monivea Road, I have spoken to the employee in the van and asked why he is parking on the footpath. He said they don’t put any speed vans in the city without the consent of the Gardaí,” said Cllr Cheevers.

Cllr Terry O’Flaherty (Ind) raised the issue of the speed van that frequents College Road and which parks in ‘Pay and Display’ spaces. She questioned if this was something these vans were entitled to do.

Responding, Chief Superintendent Tom Curley said any issue of illegal parking by speed van operators should be brought to the attention of Gardaí.

“The only input we have in these is in advising where they park in the vicinity of where accidents have happened,” said Chief Supt Curley, adding that the decision on where to locate the vans lay with the Road Safety Authority.

“If vehicles are parked illegally, ring the local station and we’ll get someone out to have a look at them. They are not exempt from the Road Traffic Act.”

In the road offences statistics, it was also revealed that pedal cycle offences have risen year-on-year, with 22 detected by Gardaí in the first five months of 2021 – a 29% increase.

Parking offences were down, from 470 in the early part of 2020 to 256 in 2021 (46%); motorists detected breaking traffic lights were down by 26% top 49.

The number of Mandatory Intoxicant Tests (MIT) checkpoints fell dramatically, from 172 to 62. This was as a result of issues over the use of breathalysers during lockdown, but Chief Supt Curley confirmed that they were now in use again.

Serious injury on the roads also fell, with just one between January and May, an 86% drop on the 2020 figure.

Meanwhile, public order offences were also down, falling from 207 to 180. Assault causing harm dropped by 62% to 16 while minor assault fell to 108 from 127.

CITY TRIBUNE

Matriarch of Scotty’s Diner donates kidney to her son!

Published

on

From this week’s Galway City Tribune – A well-known family in the Galway restaurant trade have swapped chef whites for hospital gowns after the matriarch donated a kidney to her son.

Jenny and Andrew Ishmael, synonymous with Scotty’s Diner in Cúirt na Coiribe on the Headford Road in Terryland, are recovering in Beaumont Hospital after the marathon live donor operation.

It took place last Monday and staff are so impressed by the quick recovery of mother and son that they could be discharged as early as this weekend.

“It went really well. I’m still a bit sore. We’re still on the mend. It’s working perfectly,” says Andrew from the isolation ward of the hospital’s Kidney Centre.  “My creatine was over 1,000 when I came in and it’s already around 260.

“I felt weak after the surgery, but I could feel that bit of life in me again straight away. It’s amazing how quick it works. Mom wasn’t too great after the surgery – it was her first ever. She was quite sore, a bit iffy, but she’s good now.

“We have rooms back-to-back. We’ve been going for walks, going for breakfast together. It’s nice to spend that time together.”

Andrew – or Drew as he’s known to family and friends –  was diagnosed with kidney disease when he was just 16.

Berger’s Disease occurs when an antibody called immunoglobulin builds up in the kidneys and results in inflammation, which over time, can hamper the kidneys’ ability to filter waste from the blood.

He managed the condition well for over a decade without too much impact on his life.

The son of classically trained chefs who studied together at Johnson and Wales College in Rhode Island, he grew up working in his parents’ American-style diner, trading since 1991.
This is a shortened preview version of this story. To read the rest of the article, see the February 3 edition of the Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

New River Corrib rescue boat to be deployed following ‘significant donation’

Published

on

From this week’s Galway City Tribune – The provision of a specialist rescue craft on the Corrib – upstream from the Weir – could now happen over the coming weeks or months following a ‘significant voluntary donation’ in the past few weeks, the Galway City Tribune has learned.

Water safety issues on the Corrib were highlighted last month when up to 10 rowers had to be rescued after their two boats were sucked in by the currents towards the Weir.

The Marine Casualty Investigation Board has launched an investigation into the circumstances of the potentially catastrophic incident which occurred around midday on Saturday, January 14.

A specialist D Class lifeboat is now being sourced as part of a multi-agency approach to try and improve emergency rescue operations upstream from the Weir which would be accessible on a 24/7 basis.

While the cost would be in the region of €40,000 to €50,000, the overall figure would rise to around €80,000 to €90,000 when specialist personnel training costs were included.

Galway Lifeboat Operations Manager, Mike Swan, told the Galway City Tribune that he was aware of a lot of work going on behind the scenes to try and get the Corrib rescue craft in place as soon as possible.

“I suppose we’re all trying to work together to ensure that a full-time rescue craft is provided on the Corrib and I believe that real progress is being made in this regard. This would be very good news for everyone,” said Mr Swan.
This is a shortened preview version of this story. To read the rest of the article, see the February 3 edition of the Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Three years on and ‘Changing Places’ facility on Salthill Promenade still not open

Published

on

Mayor of Galway, Cllr Clodagh Higgins at the site of the Changing Places facility, for which she had ring-fenced money. Work on the project only began last February, despite initial predictions that the facility would be open in January last year.

From this week’s Galway City Tribune – The wait for accessible, specialised toilet facilities at Ladies Beach in Salthill goes on – three years after they were ‘prioritised’ by city councillors.

Galway City Council has confirmed to the Tribune this week that the ‘Changing Places’ facility at Ladies Beach is still not open.

Construction of the facility began almost a year ago, at the end of February 2022.

The local authority confirmed that some €135,600 has been spent on the unit, which is not yet open to the public.

“The initial stages of construction went well, with the facility now largely in place. There are a number of outstanding snags to be completed before the facility can open.

“Galway City Council is liaising with the contractor to complete out these snags, with a view to opening the facility as soon as possible,” a spokesperson said.

The local authority did not elaborate on what ‘snags’ were delaying the project.

But in January, Chief Executive of Galway City Council, Brendan McGrath, suggested that staffing issues were to blame for the delay.

(Photo: Mayor of Galway, Clodagh Higgins, at the site of the Changing Places facility, for which she had ring-fenced money).
This is a shortened preview version of this story. To read the rest of the article, see the February 3 edition of the Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending