Tuam sludge will be stored in shed on Kilconnell lands

Chairperson of the Monivea Fair, Martin O'Brien, presenting Martina Kearney from Headford with the Martin O'Brien Cup for winning the Champion Dog of the Show. Also in picture is Seamus Fallon from Tuam, who took the Reserve Champion accolade. Photo: Hany Marzouk.
Chairperson of the Monivea Fair, Martin O'Brien, presenting Martina Kearney from Headford with the Martin O'Brien Cup for winning the Champion Dog of the Show. Also in picture is Seamus Fallon from Tuam, who took the Reserve Champion accolade. Photo: Hany Marzouk.

SLUDGE from a treatment plant in Tuam will be transported 30 miles away where it can be treated and then spread across agricultural lands during the winter months – this is despite some concerns expressed about the process involved.

Materials from the Tuam Waste Water Treatment Plant will be transported in sealed containers to a shed in Kilconnell where it will be de-watered and treated to make it suitable for spreading on land. The sludge is spread by ploughing it into the land and not by surface spreading.

Planning permission was granted by Galway County Council to transform an agricultural shed at Carrowreagh, Kilconnell, to a storage shed for organic compost material during the winter months. However, this decision was appealed to An Bord Pleanala who upheld the decision of county planners.

The permission was granted to Mayfield Engineering Limited for the change of use of the agricultural shed which is currently used to house cattle and horses. The lands identified for the spreading of the treated sludge are in and around the application site.

The organic compost material will comprise of de-watered sludge from the Tuam plant which will be thickened and blended. Around 1,500 tonnes of this waste will be stored in the Kilconnell shed during the winter period for the spreading on lands.

It is stated that the treated materials will be transported by tractor and sealed containers and delivered to the lands for spreading or storage during the winter months. Residue from the waste will be collected in internal drainage channels and deposited in an underground storage tank.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.