Talk on William Orpen and his wartime work

Orpen's painting of George Henry Morris from Spiddal (1872-1914), which is on display in the Museum as part of its Galway and the Great War exhibition. Courtesy of Redmond Morris.
Orpen's painting of George Henry Morris from Spiddal (1872-1914), which is on display in the Museum as part of its Galway and the Great War exhibition. Courtesy of Redmond Morris.

Irish artist William Orpen (1878-1931) will be in the spotlight this Saturday at 2.30pm in Galway City Museum when art historian Anne Cormican will discuss his wartime paintings

William Orpen was appointed an official war artist  in 1917 and was sent to the Western Front with a strict brief from the War Office as to who and what he was to paint. The intention behind the commissioning of war artists was to provide eyewitness images of the war to illustrate publications. One of Orpen’s works, depicting Lieutenant-Colonel of the Irish Guards, George Henry Morris (1872-1914) from An Spidéal, is currently on display in the Museum in its Galway and the Great War exhibition.

Anne Cormican works at the Dublin City and Hugh Lane galleries and teaches at the School of Art History and Cultural Policy, UCD, where she is completing a PhD on Orpen. Her research on Orpen’s work as an official British War Artist, which she will draw on for this lecture, was carried out at the Imperial War Museum London, and was  funded by a scholarship from the Thomas Dammann Trust.

For further details or to book, please contact the Museum on (091) 532460 or email museum@galwaycity.ie.