Spearheading a new vision for the development of Galway camogie

Owen Diviney (Athenry) and Brian Griffin (Abbeyknockmoy), who are heading up the new Galway Camogie Development Committee put in place to create a vision and mission to develop the sport further in the county.
Owen Diviney (Athenry) and Brian Griffin (Abbeyknockmoy), who are heading up the new Galway Camogie Development Committee put in place to create a vision and mission to develop the sport further in the county.

Talking Sport with Stephen Glennon

FORMER Galway intermediate camogie manager Brian Griffin, who is heading up the newly established Galway Camogie Development Committee, insists it is crucial for the sport in the county that a vision be created and put in place focusing on the long-term development of underage players which, hopefully, will translate into senior success in the years to come.

No doubt, Galway camogie has produced many extremely talented underage players over the years but the county has also frequently struggled to filter these into their senior and intermediate teams. Hence the new committee.

Along with Abbeyknockmoy man Griffin, the group also includes Johnny Kane (Turloughmore), Padraig Dolan (Liam Mellows), Kevin Flynn and Betty Coleman (both Craughwell), Michael Tarpey (Abbeyknockmoy) and NUIG performance coach lecturer Owen Diviney (Athenry).

It is Griffin and Diviney Talking Sport caught up with on this occasion and both men explain the purpose of the committee is to come up with “a clear vision” in developing players across all grades and to formulate a mission statement providing “structures and resources where girls can achieve their potential in a safe, professional and enjoyable environment”.

Moreover, the Committee want to create a “Values” system built on respect and honesty while also establishing a concise “player centred philosophy and common democratic coaching style” among all their development coaches. In other words, they wish to construct a ‘player pathway’ through the age grades so that when they reach senior level they are prepared for the challenges and have a clear understanding of their roles.

Griffin notes that in most counties and sports, including Galway camogie, it can be a bit “headless” at times with each set-up a “little island” unto themselves.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.