Some things never change: weather conditions appear to have dampened the spirits at the Shanaglish sports in September 1967.

Galway In Days Gone By

1917 Decrease in serious crime Speaking from the official document furnished to him by those in command of the police, “who, of all others, have the best and most accurate means of knowledge”, Mr. Justice Kenny,...
St Joseph's Youth Club volleyball team, Shantalla, who defeated St Augustine's in the final of the Old Galway for People Festival in St. Mary's College in November 1974. Seated (from left): Sindy Dowling, Alaco Sullivan, Fidelma Kavanagh (captain) and Ann Concannon. Standing: Mary Lally, Julie Sullivan, Mary Folan, Margaret Connolly, Mary Smith and Carmel Rigney.

Galway In Days Gone By

1917 Race Week The proposed ban of the Government upon racing was looked upon by the people of Galway with something approaching dismay.      In a resolution passed at The Galway Urban District Council some six weeks...
Galway Boy Scouts setting off from Galway rail station on a tour in August 1971.

Galway In Days Gone By

1917 No extra trains In order to secure the granting of railway excursion facilities to the various seaside resorts, a deputation waited on the Chief Secretary in the House of Commons during the week on the...
The demolition of the Pavilion Ballroom, better known as The Hangar, in Salthill Park in the 1970s. A former RAF Aerodrome in Oranmore, it was purchased by Galway Urban Council in 1924 for £400. Over the subsequent half century a succession of big international acts graced the Hangar stage — Jim Reeves, Chubby Checker, Bill Haley, Johnny Cash, Horslips, Thin Lizzy, Rory Gallagher, etc as well as all the top names from the showband era. The spartan facilities of The Hangar were put in stark perspective with the opening of the adjacent Leisureland in 1974 which soon became the city's prime concert venue for a decade or more.

Galway In Days Gone By

1917 Trans-Atlantic Port Recently there has been much discussion that is public property, and more important conferences that have been conducted in private, upon the question of building a pier to Mutton Island. Mr. Binns, the...
The funeral of Fr Peter Dooley, Parish Priest of the united parishes of St Patrick’s and the Abbey from 1869 to his death in 1911. The funeral is pictured passing down the western side of Eyre Square. Born at Culliagh near Headford in 1836, Fr Dooley was a man of the people. He was instrumental in helping to found the Galway Woollen Mills in Newtownsmyth, as well as a hosiery factory in Francis Street, both giving much-needed employment to the area. He built the Temperance Hall in Lombard Street, and provided much social housing in the Woodquay and Sickeen areas of the city without any government aid.

Galway In Days Gone By

1917 Blown to atoms About half-past five on Friday afternoon, the shock of what appeared to be a terrific explosion a considerable distance off was heard in Galway. It shook windows and doors, and many people...
Pictured at the annual dinner of Company 16th Battalion FCA in the Central Hotel , Loughrea, on St Patrick's Day, 1967.

Galway In Days Gone By

1917 Pinned beneath car While driving at 10 o’clock on Sunday morning, near Costello Bay with Mr. Rodgers, Divisional Officer of Coastguards, James Brennan, car driver, of Rosemary Lane, Galway, was pinned underneath his car, which...

BREAKING NEWS

Galway
scattered clouds
13 ° C
13 °
13 °
87%
5.7kmh
40%
Fri
14 °
Sat
13 °
Sun
15 °
Mon
14 °
Tue
16 °