Mountbellew-Moylough have no answers as champs complete ‘drive for five’

Corofin’s Micheal Lundy and team captain Ciaran McGrath celebrate with the Frank Fox Cup after retaining the Galway senior football title at Tuam Stadium on Sunday. Photo: Enda Noone.
Corofin’s Micheal Lundy and team captain Ciaran McGrath celebrate with the Frank Fox Cup after retaining the Galway senior football title at Tuam Stadium on Sunday. Photo: Enda Noone.

LEGEND has it, after the great Kerry team of the late 1970s and early ‘80s came within a kick of the ball from winning an historic five-in-a-row of All-Ireland titles, that the ‘Bomber’ Liston composed the following ditty:

“Oh, the five-in-a-row, the-five-in-a-row; Oh Christ, we were close to the five-in-a-row.”

On that September Sunday of 1982 in Croke Park, Kerry led by 0-17 to 0-15 with two minutes left on the clock before Offaly’s Seamus Darby scored the most famous goal in the history of the GAA.

There was to be no five-in-a-row for that great Kerry team, and maybe never will be again, but at Tuam Stadium on Sunday, Corofin were in no mood to have their dream denied by a late goal from any budding Seamus Darby in a black-and-amber shirt.

Corofin’s very own five-in-a-row is now only bettered by two clubs, one of them, Tuam Stars, who won six titles on the trot from 1954 to 1960, inspired of course by the ‘Terrible Twins’ — Sean Purcell and Frank Stockwell.

Before that, back in the era of the First World War, St. Grellan’s of Ballinasloe clocked up a seven-in-a-row from 1913 to 1919: those records now put a historical perspective on the achievement of this Corofin team.

Corofin had found it tough going to beat an admittedly very strong Annaghdown side in the county semi-final but in that encounter Kevin O’Brien’s team had got their ‘little warning’ and Mountbellew-Moylough were about to feel the whirlwind.

The men from Enda Colleran country fought the good fight and maintained a commendable level of effort right to the end, but it was clear from the opening 15 minutes of action, that Corofin were — to put it simply — a class apart.

Hungry and tenacious in defence; industrious around the midfield sector and utterly devastating in attack, Corofin had the gimp of winners from the opening exchanges of the match.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.