Live in the moment – and forget the camera phone

Helping out in the city centre during the recent Galway By FM Radiothon in aid of Cancer Care West and Galway Hospice last weekend were Ann Burke, Eamon McElroy, Kara Giles, and Emer Coyne.
Helping out in the city centre during the recent Galway By FM Radiothon in aid of Cancer Care West and Galway Hospice last weekend were Ann Burke, Eamon McElroy, Kara Giles, and Emer Coyne.

When we finally got to discover what caused the biggest gaffe in the history of the Oscars, it turned out that it was all because the man charged with holding the envelopes was too busy texting on his phone.

And that errant texter left the legend that is Warren Beatty as the one to face the public humiliation of announcing the wrong winner of Best Picture before La La Land had to leave the stage for Moonlight.

All the while, the man with the envelopes – PwC accountant Brian Cullinan – was tweeting a photo of Emma Stone backstage moments before handing presenters Beatty and Faye Dunaway the wrong envelope for Best Picture.

So now the Academy has banned mobile phones for PwC accountants in the future.

But why stop there?

Why not take all of the phones off all of the guests at the door and give them back with their swag bag of free goodies at the finish?

Let them concentrate on what’s happening before their very eyes – and if they want to relive the whole experience, they should have had the foresight to record it on the television before they got into the taxi.

We’re all guilty of recording life on our phones instead of in our mind’s eye these days; go to any concert and you’ll find more people watching the performance through their camera rather than with their own eyes.

They take videos of an artist from several hundred feet away when they could firstly enjoy the experience for what it is – and then buy the DVD which is actually shot from a distance that means you can actually make out who it is.

Go into any museum or historical building and you’ll find very few people actually stopping to take it all in; instead they have their phones in the air or their self-sticks pointed in their own direction for a video that they may never, ever see again.

And if they do, they won’t even recognize it – because it’s as though they never actually saw it in the first place.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.