Galway In Days Gone By

Our photo of Salthill from the 1960s shows what was known as the Ladies Beach crowded with holidaymakers, with the fold-up deck chairs which could be hired for the day just about visible on the beach. In the background, a house stood on the site of the future Leisureland, while the Hangar ballroom was in the middle of Salthill Park, to the right.
Our photo of Salthill from the 1960s shows what was known as the Ladies Beach crowded with holidaymakers, with the fold-up deck chairs which could be hired for the day just about visible on the beach. In the background, a house stood on the site of the future Leisureland, while the Hangar ballroom was in the middle of Salthill Park, to the right.

1914

Stormy scenes

On the conclusion by the Clerk of the reading of the Co. Surveyor’s report at the quarterly meeting of Tuam District Council,  Galway on the general maintenance of the roads for the preceding quarter, and the payments for that period, Mr Nohilly asked the Co. Surveyor what proportion of the total amount was to be paid. It was not really fair.

Before the Co. Surveyor could reply, a howl of protest was raised from the body of contractors at the end of the Council Chamber. “Let him make them himself”, “To h… with him” and other offensive epithets rent the air.

The Chairman vacated his seat, and appealed for order. Addressing the contractors, he said their behaviour would not serve them. They were only destroying themselves.

Every one of them had sureties, and they knew if they did not do the work themselves, those sureties would have to do it for them. It was, therefore, better that they should keep quiet. They know that this was the worst quarter of the year.

Voices: “There is no fair play; we want to speak for ourselves.”

The Chairman threatened to have them removed if they did not allow the business to proceed.

Mr. Lynskey: It is very hard to blame them.

Chairman: It is no credit to you, or the members of the Council, to be speaking in that way.

Mr. T. Burke, in a very excited tone joined the contractors in their protest against the Co. Surveyor’s report. His remarks were drowned in the noisy din that prevailed.

 

1939

Throttling eviction row

Superintendent Dunphy at Lawrencetown in the case of Thomas Quinn, Keelogues, Eyrecourt, was charged with assaulting Francis Horan, Meelick.

Horan was evicted from a labourer’s cottage, held from the Board of Health sometime previously, and in evidence told the court that he was sitting inside his own gate one day when Quinn, the defendant, passed.

Some words passed regarding the eviction, and without any apparent reason or cause, he alleged that defendant went inside the gate and throttled him, and knocked him down.

Witness’s wife, he said, came to his assistance, or the defendant, he said might have done him injury. The defendant, who was not legally represented, asked the witness if he accused him and his father of having had something to do with the eviction, and the witness denied this.

The defendant said he was proceeding along the road and spoke to Horan. Some words passed about the eviction and Horan muttered something which he took to mean that he, defendant, and his father, had something to do with evicting him. He then went inside the gate and Horan ran for a weapon – a stick. A scuffle ensued, in which he, defendant, tried to defend himself. He knocked down Horan in the scuffle.

The Justice said he would not have any hesitation in sending the defendant to prison, but on inquiring from the sergeant (Ruddy, Eyrecourt), and being informed that the defendant was a farmer, his imprisonment might be a loss to his family, the justice imposed a fine of 60s, and ordered the defendant to enter into bails for his good behaviour for twelve months, or in default, three months imprisonment.

For more from the archives from 25, 50, 75 and 100 years ago, read this week’s Tribune