Galway In Days Gone By

A stolen van being recovered from the River Corrib in January 1969. The van, owned by Mr. John Molloy, Mervue, was raised from the river bed under the directions of Mr. George Ryder, Greenfields, a member of the Galway Sub-Aqua Club.
A stolen van being recovered from the River Corrib in January 1969. The van, owned by Mr. John Molloy, Mervue, was raised from the river bed under the directions of Mr. George Ryder, Greenfields, a member of the Galway Sub-Aqua Club.

1918

Threat to kill

A savage assault was committed at Montiagh, Galway, on Monday, in which a man named John Rooney, a resident in the locality, was brutally attacked and maimed with a razor. It appears that on that morning Rooney left his house to accompany his brother, who had been out discharging his duties as water bailiff on Lough Corrib.  Meanwhile, the latter had come into contact with two poaches named John Moran and Patk. Duggan, and when he arrived Duggan, it is alleged, pulled out a razor with which he inflicted a terrible wound on John Rooney’s head, threatening to kill him.

The affray developed apparently into a terrible struggle between the brothers and the poachers. Some friends of the latter rushed to the scene and joined in the fracas. John Rooney was held by them, while, it is stated, Duggan terribly scarred him in the head and arms with the razor. It is feared that some of the wounds will have a permanent disabling effect.

Maltings robbery

The malting stores of Messrs. D.E. Williams, Tullamore, were found to be raided during the week, and, from the particulars to hand, upwards of thirty barrels of barley are missing. When the discovery was made a number of screws were found to be removed from the locks and hinges of the doors.

It is alleged by the proprietors that the premises were broken into last year about the same time and a quantity of malt taken. During the summer months the premises are closed, but a visit was paid recently by an official of the firm. Mr. Hildebrand visited the scene after the reported occurrence and investigations are being pursued.

Pay day shortage

Owing to shortage, the Banks were unable to pay sufficient silver to the constabulary on pay day.

1943

Revellers shouting

The Corporation heard complaints that some people indulged in ‘shouting and bawling’ on their way home from dances, and the Co. Manager, Mr C.I. O’Flynn, was asked to consider the action that should be taken to deal with offenders.

Mr. J. Burke asked if the Corporation had any by-laws to prohibit rowdyism on the streets at night, People coming from dances did a considerable amount of shouting and bawling at all hours of the night and he understood that no by-laws existed under which the Guards could take action against the offenders.

Ald. Brennan: It is horrible down our way. When one opens his mouth about this thing, it is said that he is objecting to dance halls, but that is not so.

Manager: If you ask the Guards to take the matter up, will you raise objections during Race Week. You all know what happens in Race Week in Galway.

Ald. Miss Ashe: That is one week in which we must give the people a free hand.

Ald. Brennan: This shouting goes on every week of the year.

Mr. O’Flaherty: Every person is on a rather joyous mood during Race Week and we should not have any action taken then.

Lighting charges

If they cut out public lighting, they might have a reign of vandalism in the city, said Mr. W. Faller at Thursday’s meeting of the Galway Corporation, when the curtailment of public lighting was under consideration.

The discussion arose when a letter was read from the E.S.B. in reply to questions raised by Ald. Brennan last month about the valuation charges in Galway compared with the valuation charges in other parts of the county. The letter stated that the charges for such large urban areas as Sligo, Drogheda, Kilkenny, Tralee, Wexford and Clonmel were identical with those which it supplied in Galway.

Bus cancellation row

Galway Corporation on Thursday added its voice to the protest already made by His Worship, Ald. J.F. Costello, P.C., against the complete withdrawal of the Galway-Salthill ‘bus service and decided to ask the G.S.R. to provide a service of twenty double runs between the city and Salthill every day for the convenience of business people and school children.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.